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  • Assessment Methods/Evaluation of Module Assignments - UCD - CTAG
    7 Use of sufficient range of sources demonstrating reasonable knowledge of essential reading in the subject D 6 Inadequate breadth of reading of relevant literature and inadequate use of lecture input and personal experience Grade Comment Grade Analysis 40 Marks Identification Understanding and Development of Key Elements Themes and Issues in relation to the topic A 28 40 Skilfully and carefully developed identification and analysis of the key elements themes and issues in relation to the topic demonstrating evidence of critical and creative thinking B 24 27 Well developed interpretation and understanding of essential elements themes and issues in relation to the topic C 16 23 Satisfactory demonstration of knowledge and understanding of the key elements themes and issues in relation to the topic D 16 Incomplete knowledge and understanding of the key elements themes and issues in relation to the topic Grade Comment Grade Relevance 15 Marks Relevant to the assignment given and linked to the needs and experience of the student A 10 15 Intelligently linked to professional needs and experience and fully relevant to the topic under discussion B 8 9 Makes good use of personal and professional experience and maintains a strong degree of relevance to the given assignment C 6 7 Adequate application to professional and personal experience and reasonably relevant to the topic D 6 Linkage between assignment and professional experience incompletely developed and significant passages of no immediate relevance to the topic under discussion Grade Comment Grade Presentation 15 Marks Quality of writing use of language academic conventions layout and design A 10 15 Skilful and exact use of language high quality presentation and accurate application of academic conventions B 8 9 Well presented fluent readable and accurate C 6 7 Presentation satisfactory reasonable clarity of expression and use of language satisfactory use

    Original URL path: http://www.ucdoer.ie/index.php?title=Assessment_Methods/Evaluation_of_Module_Assignments (2016-02-14)
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  • Learning Object Verbs - UCD - CTAG
    Experiment Explain Extend Forge Formulate Generalise Grade Identify Illustrate Improve Incorporate Infer Integrate Interpret Invent Investigate Judge Label List Measure Modify Name Order Plan Predict Prepare Produce Promote Quote Rank Rearrange Reason Recommend Reflect Relate Rewrite Scrutinise Select Separate Show Solve Substitute Summarise Support Tabulate Test Weigh Back to Resources and Literature SocialRewardingMostViewedArticles show true SocialRewardingMostViewedArticles Retrieved from http www ucdoer ie index php title Learning Object Verbs oldid 612

    Original URL path: http://www.ucdoer.ie/index.php?title=Learning_Object_Verbs (2016-02-14)
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  • Category:UCD Teaching and Learning Resources - UCD - CTAG
    may already be referred to directly with the core sections Teaching Toolkit Module Design Enhancement Overview Assessment Innovative Teaching E Learning Programme Design Development This category currently contains no pages or media Retrieved from http www ucdoer ie index php title Category UCD Teaching and Learning Resources oldid 1352 Page tools Printable version A Z glossary of terms Who s online Most recent additions Your account 91 105 69 17

    Original URL path: http://www.ucdoer.ie/index.php?title=Category:UCD_Teaching_and_Learning_Resources (2016-02-14)
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  • Assessment - UCD - CTAG
    skills attitudes teaching and learning activities and evaluation 3 Assessment is a professional activity and judgment required for quality assurance and certification What is being assessed 4 Three interrelated elements are important to consider when clarifying what should be assessed UCD level Descriptors Taxonomies of learning outcomes and a List of Graduate Attributes How do you assess student learning 5 There are five Important Messages to consider when you are planning how to assess your students Five Important Messages to consider when you are planning how to assess your students 1 Different assesments drive different types of learning 2 Be aware that you don t over assess 3 Consider assessment for your module in the context of the whole programme 4 Use a variety of methods of assessment as students have different learning styles 5 Reviewing asessments can help you as a lecturer to plan your future teaching Who Assesses Student Learning 6 In many educational institutions assessment by lecturers dominates however there is growing evidence that involving students in the assessment process helps their learning What if Answers to some common assessment questions 7 This section is designed to answer some of the What if questions that crop up

    Original URL path: http://www.ucdoer.ie/index.php?title=Assessment (2016-02-14)
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  • Assessment Methods/Appendix 1 - UCD - CTAG
    in the subject D 6 Inadequate breadth of reading of relevant literature and inadequate use of lecture input and personal experience Grade Comment Grade Analysis 40 Marks Identification Understanding and Development of Key Elements Themes and Issues in relation to the topic A 28 40 Skilfully and carefully developed identification and analysis of the key elements themes and issues in relation to the topic demonstrating evidence of critical and creative thinking B 24 27 Well developed interpretation and understanding of essential elements themes and issues in relation to the topic C 16 23 Satisfactory demonstration of knowledge and understanding of the key elements themes and issues in relation to the topic D 16 Incomplete knowledge and understanding of the key elements themes and issues in relation to the topic Grade Comment Grade Relevance 15 Marks Relevant to the assignment given and linked to the needs and experience of the student A 10 15 Intelligently linked to professional needs and experience and fully relevant to the topic under discussion B 8 9 Makes good use of personal and professional experience and maintains a strong degree of relevance to the given assignment C 6 7 Adequate application to professional and personal experience and reasonably relevant to the topic D 6 Linkage between assignment and professional experience incompletely developed and significant passages of no immediate relevance to the topic under discussion Grade Comment Grade Presentation 15 Marks Quality of writing use of language academic conventions layout and design A 10 15 Skilful and exact use of language high quality presentation and accurate application of academic conventions B 8 9 Well presented fluent readable and accurate C 6 7 Presentation satisfactory reasonable clarity of expression and use of language satisfactory use of academic conventions D 6 Expression and presentation not of a minimum acceptable

    Original URL path: http://www.ucdoer.ie/index.php?title=Assessment_Methods/Appendix_1 (2016-02-14)
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  • E-Learning - UCD - CTAG
    what does it do what do I need how does it impact teaching and things to watch out for in its implementation Using Blackboard 3 This section provides further detail about the use of particular tools within the UCD institutional VLE BLackboard Discussion Boards Quizes The Virtual Classroom Safe Assign Web 2 0 Tools for education 4 This section focuses on some Web2 0 tools providing a brief overview and introducing how they may be applied in teaching Using Blogs 5 Using Wikis 6 Using Podcasts 7 Using Facebook 8 Using Clickers 9 Using Flip Cameras 10 Design Implementation And Evaluation 11 The final section offers some general guidance in the planning design implementation and Evaluation of e learning interventions Printable Resources Finally an additional section offers a series of Print resources covering Copyright and E learning Online Communications Using Technology Effectively Technology Applications Related to Course Support Repository Initiatives Engaging in Online Activities Social Bookmarking The Evaluation of E learning Interventions Authoring Guidelines for On Screen Content Developing Reusable Learning Resources Back to UCD Teaching and Learning Resources Retrieved from http www ucdoer ie index php title E Learning oldid 2190 Page tools Printable version A Z glossary of

    Original URL path: http://www.ucdoer.ie/index.php?title=E-Learning (2016-02-14)
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  • Education Theory - UCD - CTAG
    Most theorists agree that learning cannot be studied directly but its nature can be inferred from changes in behaviour apart from B F Skinner who claims that behavioural changes are learning and therefore no further process need be inferred The majority of learning theorists share the following basic definitional assumptions about learning Learning is referred to as a persistent change in human performance or potential True whether or not they actually have an opportunity to exhibit the newly acquired performance To be considered learning a change in performance must come about as a result of the learner s experience and interaction with the world Some changes e g fine motor control can be attributed to maturation and therefore may not considered learned Behaviour changes e g search for food when hungry are explained on the basis of temporary states but don t imply learning Learning requires experience but what these are how they re used how they bring about learning constitute the focus of every learning theory Theory Practice I repeat as long as you have studied the theory hard enough And what good s theory going to be in the real world said Harry loudly his fist in the air again Professor Umbridge looked up This is school Mr Potter not the real world she said softly J K Rowling The history of the application of psychological theories to education has been described as a spotty one Sternberg 2008 John Dewey 1938 1997 was among the first serious scholars of education to take this task seriously and much of contemporary psychology of education may be seen as originating in large part with Dewey s work There is an implicit assumption that there is a tangible connection between educational theory and practice In reality though the relationship between educational theory and classroom practice is more complex than is usually assumed Below Saugstad 2002 discusses the differing definitions of theory and practice In education the meaning of the term theory ranges from being connected to scientific knowledge academic subjects and to empirical and pragmatic knowledge such as educational methodology The dualism of theory and practice which is reflected in the dictionary definition is also evident in education where theory is often understood as being all that is not practice This could be why the term theoretical is regularly used to denote academic as opposed to practical school subjects and school based teaching as opposed to practical internship In one perspective theory is understood to be normative for practice and in the other perspective theory is understood to be derived from practice The first implies practice having to adapt to theory Here the term theory attaches itself to scientific knowledge the knowledge one acts on in practice is thus understood here as being synonymous with applied scientific knowledge The second that theory is defined through practice theory is almost understood to be verbalised practice it becomes a kind of pragmatic guide for actions where the ideal is a connection between theory and

    Original URL path: http://www.ucdoer.ie/index.php?title=Education_Theory (2016-02-14)
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  • Education Theory/Additional Theory - UCD - CTAG
    women as sex objects By reducing other people to things it permits us to treat them with less care and human concern bypassing our values around this subject Example This car is like a thoroughbred race horse Just imagine thundering up the roads with trees and houses flying by People will think you are Michael Schumacher In war effort is often put into depersonifying the other side thus legitimizing and even encouraging killing them Theory 3 Social Identity Theory Description When we belong to a group we are likely to derive our sense of identity at least in part from that group We also enhance the sense of identity by making comparisons with out groups Social identity is different from personal identity which is derived from personal characteristics and individual relationships Research Breakwell 1978 studied teenage soccer fans some of whom went to most games whilst others did not go to games Those who did not go to games were the most vehement about their loyalty and showed most in group bias presumably as they had a greater need to prove themselves as fans Example When abroad especially in countries which have particularly different languages and cultures we feel our nationality far more keenly than when we are at home We will tend to band together in national groups perhaps making comments about the strangeness of the natives Theory 4 Social Facilitation Description When we are have tasks which we find relatively easy we find the presence of other people a positive stimulus such that we perform even better However when the tasks are difficult we find the audience unnerving and we are more likely to put in a worse performance When the task being performed is relatively easy we are likely to do it more quickly When the task is difficult then we are likely to take more time to ensure we get it right it is more embarrassing to be seen to be wrong than be seen to be slow This is because first the presence of others increases physiological arousal such that our bodies become more energized and secondly because when we are aroused it is more difficult to perform new or difficult tasks The dominant response is that under arousal it is easier to do things we can easily perform The presence of others makes us suspect evaluation Depending on how we forecast that evaluation we may look forward to either adulation or criticism and rejection Research Michaels 1982 and three colleagues overtly watched students play pool The better players got better The novices got worse Example Top sports people are often lifted by the crowd to give their best ever performances at big events Lower down the order less confident sports people can find the crowds unnerving and consequently make mistakes Additional Literature on development of memory systems across the lifespan Sander MC Werkle Bergner M Gerjets P Shing YL Lindenberger U 2012 The two component model of memory development and its potential implications for

    Original URL path: http://www.ucdoer.ie/index.php?title=Education_Theory/Additional_Theory (2016-02-14)
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