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  • Advancing Active and Engaging Learning - UCD - CTAG
    Questions that Prompt Critical Thinking Preparing to look for critical thinking in the work of your students Back to the Homepage Retrieved from http www ucdoer ie index php title Advancing Active and Engaging Learning oldid 870 Page tools Printable version A Z glossary of terms Who s online Most recent additions Your account 91 105 69 17 Talk for this IP address Log in create account Bookmark and share

    Original URL path: http://www.ucdoer.ie/index.php?title=Advancing_Active_and_Engaging_Learning (2016-02-14)
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  • Definition of Small Group Teaching - UCD - CTAG
    7 step procedure There is no magical number that defines a group as a Small Group A lecturer used to taking 400 in a lecture would define 50 as a small group As there can be sub groups within groups it is hard to define small group In a discussion where participation is assessed some students may not speak up in a group that begins to be get bigger than 10 participants and in addition tutors would find it hard to assess participation by individual students in groups with numbers greater than this Ruddok 1978 Luker 1989 Griffiths Houston Lazenbatt 1996 researched that students enjoyed and benefited from small groups The tutorial in particular has been noted for its value in Complementing knowledge in lectures Expanding on the concepts considered in lectures Encouraging student reflection Developing students communication skills Encouraging active life long learning An element often over looked is the role of online discussion groups in facilitating ongoing information sharing and knowledge construction These may be used in conjunction with both the lecture and traditional tutorial adding an additional element of large to small group collaborative interaction An issue that arises is how may one assess and or evaluate online participation and contribution Creanor 2004 offers a simple dual guide to identifying individual elements within contributions and their level of critical thinking and how they interact collaborate with the wider cohort Types of Online Contributions Individual Thinking Offering up ideas or resources and inviting critique of them Asking challenging questions Articulating explaining and supporting positions on issues Exploring and supporting issues by adding explanations and examples Reflecting on and re evaluating personal opinions Interactive Thinking Offering a critique challenging discussing and expanding the ideas of others Negotiating interpretations definitions and meanings Summarising and modelling previous contributions Proposing actions based

    Original URL path: http://www.ucdoer.ie/index.php?title=Definition_of_Small_Group_Teaching (2016-02-14)
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  • Definition of Small Group Teaching/Dealing With Common Small Group Problems or Issues - UCD - CTAG
    involvement Discussions tend to be at a low cognitive level and boring Questions asked by tutors rarely go beyond eliciting recall Tutor asks too many questions at once without guidance on which elements are most important Tutor fails to build on the answers obtained Discussion is unfocussed for much of the time One or two students are allowed to dominate the discussion Submit your answers Back to Definition of Small

    Original URL path: http://www.ucdoer.ie/index.php?title=Definition_of_Small_Group_Teaching/Dealing_With_Common_Small_Group_Problems_or_Issues (2016-02-14)
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  • Flexible Learning Defined - UCD - CTAG
    of some of these Exercise Complete the Personal Action Plan using the question prompts Name Date What specific changes do you want to make to your teaching identify the particular session cohort context etc What will be the first steps Who or what will support you Who or what may hinder you How will you overcome these issues How will you evaluate the change Submit your answers Back to Engaging

    Original URL path: http://www.ucdoer.ie/index.php?title=Flexible_Learning_Defined (2016-02-14)
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  • How to Ask Questions that Prompt Critical Thinking - UCD - CTAG
    3 Application the ability to apply what is learned to a new situation 2 Comprehension the ability to interpret information in one s own words 1 Knowledge the ability to recall facts opinions and concepts From Anderson et al 2001 Example Question Constructs 1 Knowledge Exhibits previously learned material by recalling facts terms basic concepts and answers What is When did happen How would you explain Why did How would you describe 2 Comprehension Demonstrating understanding of facts and ideas by organising comparing translating interpreting giving descriptions and stating main ideas How would you compare contrast Explain in your own words What facts or ideas show What evidence is there that 3 Application Solving problems by applying acquired knowledge facts techniques and rules in a different way What examples can you find to How would you show your understanding of What approach would you use to What might have happened if 4 Analysis Examining and breaking information into parts by identifying motives or causes making inferences and finding evidence to support generalisations What inference can you make from How would you classify How would you categorise Can you identify the difference parts 5 Evaluation Presenting and defending opinions by making judgements about information validity of ideas or quality of work based on a set of criteria How would you compare Which do you think is better Evaluate contribution of to What was the value or importance of in What would you have recommended if you had been 6 Creation Synthesis Compiling information together in a different way by combining elements in a new pattern or proposing alternative solutions What might have happened if Can you propose an alternative interpretation to that of Is there a marmite solution 1 here Exercise Use the question constructs to compose relevant questions for your

    Original URL path: http://www.ucdoer.ie/index.php?title=How_to_Ask_Questions_that_Prompt_Critical_Thinking (2016-02-14)
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  • Learning Contracts - UCD - CTAG
    the knowledge of the student and what it is they need wish to learn A learning contract usually has a written record of A series of negotiated learning goals objectives These are set between the student and the tutor expert The strategies and resources by which these goals can be met The evidence which will be presented to show that objectives have been achieved and how it will be assessed A time scale for completion The Negotiated Learning Contract Agreement This variation provides for clarity of purpose learning goals and experiences and of roles of the tutor learner peer etc In addition it enables the parties to gain a sense of ownership to the overall process this in itself provides a strong motivational justification for partaking in any future collaborative activities It also opens the path for the development of a number of key transferable skills such as communication personal effectiveness reflective practice etc In this process the learner is required to be explicit about their learning intentions setting and agreeing to achievable goals And being able to justify their own plans in terms of x where x is the curriculum or agreed learning outcomes This is achievable at undergraduate level whether through class discussion or tangentially through individual learners deciding on their particular pathways such as the choices provided by UCD Horizons At graduate level it is almost an inevitability that this will occur in the discussions between a research student and their supervisor This is further supported by recent interventions such as student PDP personal development planning and supervisor evaluation cycles Negotiated Learning Contracts Advantages Disadvantages Support individualised learning and flexible learning Need to be carefully introduced Enhance self reflection learning to learn and self management Can be inflexible i e not take account of changes in learner

    Original URL path: http://www.ucdoer.ie/index.php?title=Learning_Contracts (2016-02-14)
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  • Learning Contracts/Example Learning Contract - UCD - CTAG
    What the learner will do to achieve these outcomes Evidence How the learner will demonstrate achieving the outcomes Assessment Criteria Negotiated or standard Submit your answers Back to Learning Contracts Continue to Student Centred Approaches SocialRewardingMostViewedArticles show true SocialRewardingMostViewedArticles Retrieved from http www ucdoer ie index php title Learning Contracts Example Learning Contract oldid 585 Page tools Printable version A Z glossary of terms Who s online Most recent additions

    Original URL path: http://www.ucdoer.ie/index.php?title=Learning_Contracts/Example_Learning_Contract (2016-02-14)
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  • Learning Opportunities for Active Engagement - UCD - CTAG
    and Consequence of the source materials Teaching Abstract Concepts Utilise graphical representations art diagrams even sculpture invite learners to explore relationships via their own diagrams Manifesto writing invite learners to apply the theoretical to practice Wall of Post its invite learners to respond emotionally and intellectually discuss the divergence and its impact on the nature of the concept Teaching with Numerical Data Bogus data invite learners to identify and explain why certain data is not admissable Predictions provide partial data invite learners to intepret and extrapolate real figures Market Translation invite learners to represent the meaning of figures in another form Based on Davies 2001 Miscellaneous ideas Active Reading get learners to make note of questions before reading the task then becomes reading with an agenda Also stress the importance of creating summaries or synopses of the texts Card Groups provide groups with a focused question on a card ask them to answer on same card Grafitti Puzzles invite learners to annotate a map diagram image etc and share notes with other learners Googlejockeying utilise the students laptops in session invite them to seek out information on a particular topic and present it back to their group or cohort PRS Clickers utilise handheld quiz remotes to interact with the class gaining opinion consensus level of understanding etc Segmented Presentations invite learners todo a 3 minute presentation on an issue question theme etc present for 1 minute group response for 5 minutes etc SMS 98 of students have a mobile phone invite responses to a mobile blog or text manager Video provide learners with duties identified tasks regarding the video turn off the sound and ask for a commentary or narration Wikis utlising laptops invite students to brainstorm contribute debate etc in an active wiki Back to Engaging Students Continue to

    Original URL path: http://www.ucdoer.ie/index.php?title=Learning_Opportunities_for_Active_Engagement (2016-02-14)
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