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  • was unequivocal with regard to what is expected from Iran at this stage and any future steps deemed necessary by the international community if Iran fails to negotiate We have agreed that if Iran decides not to engage in negotiations further steps would be taken in the Security Council On United Nations reform the parties agreed to cooperate to ensure the new Human Rights Council becomes an efficient agency committed to the promotion and protection of human rights and fundamental freedoms Washington and Brussels reaffirmed a mutual commitment to wider UN reform although nothing in the declaration referred to the current financial budget difficulties in the UN Regarding the recently agreed Darfur Peace Agreement the leaders indicted their mutual desire to work with the UN and other regional partners to implement the agreement quickly Again nothing in the declaration explicitly addressed the current impasse regarding the Sudanese governments refusal to allow UN peacekeepers into the region In recent years the issue of climate change and sustainable development has increasingly becoming a centerpiece for many political parties around Europe This shift reflects the grassroots nature of the environmental debate In addition increasingly high oil prices are forcing many to question the practicality of non renewable fuel sources In this context the statement on Promoting Strategic Cooperation on Energy and Energy Security Climate Change and Sustainable Development was a timely development The mutual commitments agreed upon at the summit are far reaching and extensive They involve maintaining an up to date analysis on geopolitical implications of the worldwide energy situation the promotion of diversified fuel sources including through the use of biofuels continued cooperation for the promotion of the hydrogen economy and ensuring environmental security and safety of energy infrastructures A significant development includes the creation of an EU U S High Level Dialogue on Climate Change Clean Energy and Sustainable Development to enhance bilateral and multilateral initiatives on Climate Change and Clean Energy back to top The New Transatlantic Agenda Suat Kiniklioglu In April the German Marshall Fund of the United States organized the inaugural Brussels Forum a new platform designed to facilitate discussion on issues and topics of mutual concern for Europe and America According to Suat Kiniklioglu the agenda for transatlantic relations has shifted away from the traditional cold war debates around collective security and is now increasingly focused on issues including inter alia energy terrorism immigration and the proliferation of nuclear capabilities On the economic front the development and economic challenge of India and China are central discussion points The developing calamity in the Darfur region of Sudan received due attention by the forum There was an overwhelming consensus that the international community can no longer ignore the dire situation The argument was succinct and cogent our conscience cannot remain at peace without stopping the violence there The American Senator John McCain R AZ and former U S Assistant Secretary of State Richard Holbrooke emphasized the need to incorporate Turkey within the transatlantic framework According to Holbrooke how the EU treats Turkey has a direct impact on the transatlantic relationship Discussions concerning the on going Iran dilemma and Russian democracy also feature predominantly among members of the forum On Iran there was general agreement that attempts by the Islamic Republic to acquire nuclear facilities constituted a grave threat to both Europe and America If Iran managed to secure nuclear technical expertise than regional stability is likely to be severely shaken Regarding Russia the forum highlighted a shift towards authoritarian rule The de democratization of Russia was signaled a major development in geo politics However there remained a clear divide between Europe and America as regards the necessary policy towards Russia According to Suat Kiniklioglu the discussions within the forum indicated a changing dynamic in global affairs Europeans seemed more willing to promote their own interests rather than just coattail on Washington s policies While the serious issue of energy security and the environment featured as significant aspects in debates the overarching September 11 environment still dominated discussions Suat Kiniklioglu The New Transatlantic Agenda Turkish Daily News May 3 2006 back to top The United States and International Affairs The End of the Bush Revolution Philip H Gordon On assuming the presidency of the United States in 2001 George Bush and his administration have been marked by controversy and subject to countless assessments by political pundits and academic scholars The particulars of the 2002 National Security Strategy NSS set the foundation for what later became known as the Bush Doctrine The doctrine altered America s foreign policy orientation from relative multilateralism toward a strategy of unilateral preventive war founded on a recognised and asserted U S global preponderance of power and couched in the rhetorical messianic language of a necessary and timeless war against terrorism The argument that September 11 2001 marked the beginning of a new global threat that would require a radically new foreign policy strategy has bolstered the administrations action In this interesting article by Philip Gordon of the Brookings Institution the language of the Bush administration s 2006 National Security Strategy is contrasted with action According to Gordon the Bush administration s revolutionary foreign policy rhetoric has not changed but its actual polices have Exploring the language of 2006 National Security Strategy uncovers the relative consistency in policy of the Bush administration Statements stressing the fact that America is at war and highlighting the president s commitment to fight our enemies abroad instead of waiting for them to arrive in our country are clearly analogous with the rhetoric and missionary zeal of the 2002 NSS In fact comparing and contrasting the two documents reveals a consistency in foreign policy thought based on the Bush Doctrine But if the rhetoric of the Bush revolution lives on the revolution itself is over An examination of the foreign policy trajectory of the administration supports this suggestion Gordon argues that during the first tenure of the current Bush presidency 2001 2005 America overstretched itself in Iraq alienated vital allies

    Original URL path: http://www.ucdclinton.ie/newsletter_ta_vol2issue1 (2016-02-09)
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  • work productively to fight mutual challenges or be a spoiler Europe and America need to send the same message to Russia in our relations with that country and of course a strategic partnership with Russia should still be our chosen path But the EU US relationship must be resolute in our determination that Russia democratize and reform John Edwards The Transatlantic Partnership in an Age of Global Challenges key note address at the Brussels Forum The German Marshall Fund back to top Transatlantic Approaches to International Law John B Bellinger III There is little doubt that the transatlantic partnership is fundamental to the peace security and economic prosperity of both Europe and America for over sixty years For many the recent division in policy over Iraq has provided the framework through which transatlantic is to be assessed According to this assessment American and European worldviews are now bifurcated or as Robert Kagan uncomplicatedly framed it Americans are from Mars and Europeans are from Venus An exalted example of these differences is manifesting the area of international law Washington s reluctance to be constrained by international treaties such as the Kyoto protocol the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty the International Criminal Court and the monitoring mechanisms of the Biological Weapons Convention only added to the belief that the long era in transatlantic cooperation is over In this interesting article John B Bellinger III legal advisor to the U S Secretary of State asks whether there is actually a deep divide between the United States and Europe on questions of international law And if so how significant is this divide According to Bellinger embedded within the criticism of U S policy are several reoccurring categories of mistakes which should be discussed First America is often heavily criticized for failing to sign or ratify a treaty The Kyoto Protocol is a useful example For Bellinger America did not ratify the treaty because the U S did not think it was sound public policy This decision was perfectly legal under international law Second the article maintains that there exists a tendency to conflate the failure to subscribe to international agreements and the decision to withdraw from international agreements with a disregard for international law A third type of criticism disagreements with U S interpretations of international instruments is important as it again leads critics to regard the U S a contravening international law when in actuality America is only interpreting a treaty differently This is quite practice in international law and there is no secret that treaty language is often drafted so as to permit more than one interpretation Of course Bellinger does not deny that there are transatlantic differences in approach to international law His contention is that when examined these differences have very little to do with a disregard for international law and instutions Given the increasing strain on both multilateralism and international law as reflected in recent controversies regarding the law of war and occupation in particular the Hague Regulations and the Geneva Conventions it is perhaps more important then ever to dispel any myths in the transatlantic partnership and instead begin a process of understanding designed to achieve a more productive legalistic future John B Bellinger III Transatlantic Approaches to International Law The Atlantic Council of the United States back to top American and European Leaders Want Improved Cooperation To Lead To Action on Sudan By some estimates over two hundred thousand people have been killed and two million driven from their homes since 2003 in the western Sudan province of Darful Is the world s attendtion now focused on the conflict enough to broker an end to the killing and bring pease and stability to this war torn country Certainly the rhetoric from international community is positive and media attendion has once again found a story in Sudan However many wonder whether this recent effort to end the suffering will just fail as the Comprehensive Peace Accord failed in January 2005 Is there enough politifcal will to force the Sudanese government to stop the reassertion of the Janjaweed militia and end the hardship in Darfur once and for all At a meeting of political and intellectual leaders organized by the German Marshall Fund in April 2006 the participants emphasized a firm desire to see EU US cooperation enhanced in Sudan According to Javier Solana Darfur is a case in which we are working together much more intensely today than a month ago a few months ago or years ago Senator John McCain Rep reiterated the need for EU US action but was firm in his conviction that we need more troops We need better logistic support We need more pressure put on the Sudanese government McCain ignored the usual diplomatic tiptoeing and stated that today thousands of people will die others will be slaughtered That millions are displaced and the world is standing by because we don t have the political framework Former US Ambassador to the United Nations Richard Holbrooke was shocked by the fact that in the middle of all this killing and political stagnation the World Food Program had recently announced that they re having daily calorie content cut from 2 100 calories a day to 1 050 because less than one third of the 700 million dollars it asked for from donors had come through On 1 May 2006 U S Deputy Secretary of State Robert B Zoellick was dispatched to Sudan to push for a peace agreement This trip was announced in the context of a two day extended deadline for a settlement that ended without agreement According to Secretary of State Rice the President feels very strongly and passionately about the need for agreement and for establishing a large African security force to protect the people of Darfur As the crisis in Darfur continues to get worse only time will tell whether Europe and America are committed to achieving permanent peace in Sudan Jaap de Hoop Scheffer Richard C Holbrooke John McCain Dr Javier

    Original URL path: http://www.ucdclinton.ie/newsletter_ta_vol1issue6 (2016-02-09)
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  • documents There is of course a careful balance that needs to be struck between the implementation of legislation that is designed to thwart the terrorist networks and the infringement on individual freedom After all the road from legitimate suspicion to rampant paranoia is very short indeed Ambassador Gray offers a summation of the challenge ahead Our challenge is to preserve the legal protections we extend to our citizens as we take the steps necessary to safeguard them against terrorist attacks The Ambassador concluded by praising the current on going cooperation and summed up the path ahead by stating that the challenge against terrorism is a collective challenge and it requires a collective response Gray Boyden How to Overcome Political Obstacles For a Truly Global Response February 2006 The East West Institute back to top U S and Europe Advancing The Freedom Agenda Together Daniel Fried According to Daniel Fried U S Assistant Secretary for European and Eurasian Affairs American support for freedom is the foundation of the Bush Administration s foreign policy This foreign policy trajectory was first initiated in President Bush s second inaugural speech but Fried argues it has formed a long standing and consistent element in US foreign policy for nearly a century In pursuit of this policy the United States and Europe are essentially united The acrimonious language and sentiment that was so prevalent during 2003 and 2004 over Iraq has all but disappeared And in fact there is evidence to now to suggest that there is a developing transatlantic consensus and that our shared interests cannot be separated from our shared values In January German Chancellor Merkel met with President Bush in Washington and stated her commitment to transatlantic unity in confronting the challenge of Iran Furthermore the acrimonious language between Europe and the US in 2003 and 2004 has all but ended What we no longer hear are the voices calling for a strong Europe as a counterweight to the United States a check on U S economic political and military power In fact according to a recent German Marshall Fund poll seventy four percent of the European public supports joint European American action to advance democracy in the world For Fried all this is evidence of a developing transatlantic consensus Throughout his speech Fried gave a clear indication of where he believes European and American priorities lie in 2006 A solution to the on going Balkan impasse needs to be reached It is of crucial importance that the transatlantic alliance cooperates to bring the Balkans from post war to pre Europe Our continuing efforts to support and conate democracy in Ukraine Georgia and Kyrgyzstan should be maintained and enhanced Also we should continue to help the Belarusian people achieve democracy and to encourage countries such as Azerbaijan and Kazakhstan to move more decisively and consistently in the direction of democracy Regarding Iraq Fried argued that Europeans now realize that failure in Iraq would be detrimental to our common interest in the Middle East On Iran he stated that Europe and America should not now accept that theocracy and isolation are the fate or desire of the Iranian people We should provide an agenda of hope for Iran Moreover international pressure on Iran should continue and increase throughout 2006 Fried Daniel U S and Europe Advancing the Freedom Agenda Together January 18 2006 Address to the Baltimore Council on Foreign Relations back to top The United States and International Affairs The Demagogue Neocons Love to Hate Jim Lobe The mounting foreign policy challenge facing Washington policymakers is to stop Iran developing nuclear weapons This challenge is potentially so volatile as to replace Iraq as the key foreign policy issue of the 2008 presidential campaign Against this background it would appear strange that influential neoconservatives in Washington are welcoming Tehran s defiance In a recent article Reuel Marc Gerecht of the neoconservative American Enterprise Institute wrote the new president of the Islamic Republic of Iran Mahmoud Ahmadinejad is a godsend The praise does not stop there however other likeminded neoconservatives have echoed this sentiment in recent months In his new book Tehran Rising Iran s Challenge to the United States hawkish author IIan Berman writes Thank goodness for Mahmoud Ahmadinejad According to Gerecht Ahmadinejad s inflamed rhetoric against America Israel and the Jews which is in keeping with the style and substance of the president s former comrades in the praetorian Revolutionary Guard Corps combined with the clerical regime s decision to restart uranium enrichment has returned some sense of urgency to efforts to thwart Tehran Jim Lobe argues that Ahmadinejad s declarations are like sweet music to the ears of neoconservatives who for years have long had Tehran in their gun sights Notwithstanding the desire of neoconservatives to act against Tehran the administration has been accused of being too complacent To many it seems ironic that the administration which promulgated and then implemented a doctrine of preventive war against presumed enemies has not taken any firm action The continuing failure of the EU 3 Germany the United Kingdom and France to reach a diplomatic compromise and the nature of the remarks from Tehran seems to provide the administration with a clear unilateral mandate to act Could it be that the United States has learnt lessons from the on going debacle in Iraq Or is this just a Republican plan to shift a war weary American public s attention off the mess in Iraq There is little doubt that Iraq has overstretched U S ground forces Lobe believes the most Washington can do militarily is to use air power to take out as many nuclear related sites as possible reportedly more than 300 requiring three days of non stop bombing and hope for the best However many in the administration see the military option as the absolute last resort In all my conversations with senior administration officials I have never heard them be so cautious about what they can know and tentative about what they

    Original URL path: http://www.ucdclinton.ie/newsletter_ta_vol1issue5 (2016-02-09)
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  • but also urged the EU to continue to play a constructive role in Iraq and the Middle East in the coming year In his concluding remarks Burns recognised the need to establish a strategic consensus on how to engage a rising India and China Burns Nicholas A Renewed Partnership for Global Engagement December 15 2005 back to top Diverging paths hurt U S and Europe Bates Gill and Robin Niblett According to Gill and Niblett conflicting and divergent EU US policy and approaches toward the economic rise of China could produce a substantial negative economic and security impact for the Atlantic partnership The concurrent rise of China s economic strength coupled with its military and diplomatic expansion has created great unease among many in Washington and sparked off a resurgence of China bashing in America However at the same time China is welcoming with open arms many EU trade delegations that are seeking a piece of the economic action in the Chinese domestic market The EU has already become China s leading trade partner and China is the second largest destination in the world for EU exports Instead of working with the EU to capitalise on China s emerging economic growth Washington has as of recent years been preoccupied with preventing the EU s proposed lifting of their 1989 arms embargo against China These efforts involved lecturing the Europeans about the potential security risks that China poses to Asia a region across which the US extends important security guarantees and maintains significant numbers of deployed forces However Europe has also been wary about consulting with the US on their policies toward China especially in the economic sphere Moreover many Europeans believe that the US s confrontational attitude toward China will create a self fulfilling prophecy of Chinese militarism This current situation serves the interest of neither the US nor the EU According to Gill and Niblett the US and European leaders need to put as much effort into understanding their respective policies toward China as they are putting into their bilateral discussion with China Under continued pressure from Washington the EU has shelved its plans to lift the embargo Gill Bates and Niblett Robin Diverging paths hurt U S and Europe Pacfic Forum CSIS September 12 2005 Available on the Internet at back to top The United States and International Affairs Is Washington Losing Latin America Peter Hakim On taking office in 2000 President George Bush stated that relations with Latin America would form a fundamental tenet of US foreign policy Washington publicly lauded the region s progress toward democratic governance and capitalist market economies However according to Peter Hakim President of the Inter American Dialogue after September 11 2001 the US effectively lost interest in Latin America Since then the attention the United States has paid to the region has been sporadic and narrowly targeted at particularly troubling or urgent situations Furthermore support throughout the Latin American region for Washington s polices has diminished markedly In fact relations have

    Original URL path: http://www.ucdclinton.ie/newsletter_ta_vol1issue4 (2016-02-09)
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  • mean It is not surprising therefore that the myths of a European Union responsible for bringing peace to a worn torn land after 1945 ensuring economic stability through the Cold War spreading democracy to the darkest corners of Europe all encapsulated within the overarching communality of a common European civilisation are disseminated widely as popular fact n this article Alan Sked provides a sceptical and rather pessimistic view of the European project According to Sked if an historical analysis of the European project can show anything it is that the rejection of the constitutional treaty in spring this year by French and Dutch is not the end of attempts to implement this document Sked cites the NICE referendum in Ireland as a case in point To EU leaders no must mean yes And when leaders eventually go back to the people of Europe to ask for their approval they will rehearse familiar arguments They will reminisce about how the EU brought peace to Europe after world war II while neglecting to factor in the dominant role played by the military destruction and occupation of Germany the establishment of NATO and the defence of Europe by British American and Canadian forces Following this myth comes the trade myth Britain for example has been told that to trade with Europe you must be part of it But according to Sked this is a weak argument based on a false assessment The UK can trade with America without adopting the dollar and needn t adopt the yen to trade with Japan The argument posited that the EU democratised Eastern Europe as well as Greece Spain and Portugal is also exaggerated and historical impoverished in its assessment It fails to take a full account of the role of Ronald Reagan and Mikhail Gorbachev in ending the Cold War Encapsulating the myths outlined above is the overarching myth posited about a common European civilisation Again Sked argues that this argument neglects to take a full account of the historical facts and is remarkably selective in its historical approach In this context what does the future hold for the European Union Sked offers a rather alarming and pessimistic view that the whole rotten edifice will collapse beneath the weight of its contradictions and its own electorates will help it crumble However in the short term we should expect more of the same Sked Alan Europe s Trash Talk Foreign Policy July 2005 back to top What New Transatlantic Institutions Charles Grant and Mark Leonard According to Charles Grant and Mark Leonard the European Union and the United States lack any sufficient institutional arrangement to discuss big strategic questions and now at the moment when the future of NATO is unsure is the time to begin to rethinking the methods of conducting this vital relationship Of course they recognise the important role of the annual EU US Summit but question its ability to achieve the require outcome on issues of major geopolitical importance This problem is particularly acute given the nature of the rotating EU presidency and the fact that small and sometimes neutral countries are at helm It is not that small member states do not have the right foreign policy prescriptions but rather more often than not they have a narrower foreign policy perspective than the big three of Britain France and Germany Grant and Leonard argue the merits of a smaller annual transatlantic meeting at the highest levels On the European side no more than five leaders would participate these would probably include the leaders of Britain Germany France the Commission and the Council Secretariat and would be complemented on the American side by the President and four of his most senior advisors The meeting would be conducted in an informal setting and no press would be invited A forum of this kind would enable a frank discussion of some of the most important and pressing international challenges facing all nations A secondary meeting could also take place consisting of contact groups These contact groups would consist of the American Secretary of State and perhaps others on the US side and the relevant EU foreign ministers depending on the topic and Solana on the European side Obviously these proposals require a more coherent EU foreign policy in the main but the apparent openness to a different kind of EU US institutional relationship may stem as much from NATO s waning salience as the allure of a strong European Union Whatever the cause this opportunity will require vision and mature leadership to implement Grant Charles and Leonard Mark What New Transatlantic Institutions April May 2005 back to top The United States and International Affairs Enduring Freedom Public Diplomacy and US Foreign Policy Liam Kennedy Scott L ucas In this cogent and illuminating article Liam Kennedy and Scott Lucas contend that in the last few years US public diplomacy has undergone intensive reorganisation and retooling as it takes on a more prominent propaganda role in the efforts to win the hearts and minds of foreign publics and that this new public diplomacy functions in a conflicted space of power and value that is a crucial theatre of strategic operations for the renewal of American hegemony within a transformed global order The paper divided into three parts provides a succinct and useful synthesis of the historical development of Cold War American public diplomacy from the 1940s through to an examination of selected lineaments of a new US public diplomacy endeavouring to achieve successful political results around the world post September 11 2001 According to Kennedy and Lucas post 9 11 American public diplomacy functions as both a tool of national security and as a component of US efforts to manage the emerging formation of a neoliberal empire In the final part of this paper Kennedy and Lucas argue a need to re think our understanding of the mode and meanings of US public diplomacy in ways that enable a deeper exploration of the relationship between the power

    Original URL path: http://www.ucdclinton.ie/newsletter_ta_vol1issue3 (2016-02-09)
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  • past Kupchan emphasizes five key lessons that Europe must recognize before moving forward First the 1 May 2004 enlargement of the EU while crucial to conating central Europe s democratic transition has come at the expense of a deeper Union Deepening should have taken place in advance of widening allowing the EU to function more efficiently with ten new members Second in the recent referenda on the Constitutional Treaty in France and The Netherlands Europe s economic woes were cited as central reasons to vote Non In this way Europe became a scapegoat for the shortcomings of national governments Clearly Europe must economically reform for integration to be successful however it is member States such as France and Germany the traditional economic locus of Europe that need to reform and remove national impediments to economic development for overall growth to be obtained Third faced with eastward expansion and the commencement of accession talks with Turkey that could lead to Union membership in the future the EU must work to encourage ethnic tolerance and the integration of Muslims into the mainstream The fourth lesson Kupchan cites is the democratic deficit a problem that many in Europe feel needs to be addressed before Europe integrates further Finally the desire among some European leaders to cast the EU as a counterbalance to the US in the world is likely to fail because most Europeans do not want to choose between the EU and the United States While many in Europe have an aversion to President Bush and his polices they would prefer to maintain the close Atlantic alliance between Europe and America Kupchan argues that EU leaders that seek a greater geopolitical role for the EU are only likely to succeed in dividing Europe itself Kupchan Charles Casting the EU as a counterweight to the US would only divide Europe Irish Times Article 10 August 2005 back to contents The Shared Farm Policy Agenda in Brussels and Washington Susan Sechler and Jack Thurston Transatlantic dialogue on farming and food policy is often complicated acrimonious and without results Both sides point the finger and accuse the other of being the worst offender in terms of subsidies tariffs or discriminatory use of food safety regulations According to Susan Sechler and Jack Thurston transatlantic comparisons are problematic because farm structures and farm policies are so different However in the face of new domestic and international pressures the time is now right to begin a positive transatlantic debate on the future path of agriculture policy Regarding export markets Europe is progressing in the direction of high margin speciality products while the US is still competing as a low cost producer of bulk commodities The structures of farm support policies which are having harmful effects on the economies of developing countries are also very different on both sides of the Atlantic On the whole the EU has higher tariffs on agricultural products than America but Europe does import a substantial amount under preferential trade agreements with former colonies 85 per cent of agricultural exports from the African continent are to Europe Despite these differences the EU and the US do share the challenge of trying to reconcile the narrow interests of individual domestic commodity producers and the interests of the wider economy in an increasingly competitive world Sechler and Thurston contend that domestic budgetary subsidy problems within the EU and the US combined with new issues of conservation and rural development as underscored by various NGO groups are today being compounded by the larger challenge of trade liberalisation within the agricultural sector Furthermore the pressure in the EU and US to reach agreement on the Doha Development Agenda is growing from a variety of business sectors including non agricultural businesses and other food producers who see future growth potential in developing markets Obviously the hard politics of large entitlement programmes mean that agriculture will remain the most heavily subsidised economic sectors in both the US and the EU for some time to come However faced with similar pressures to structure agricultural trade in a way that decreases trade tensions promotes trade access for developing economies and offers value for taxpayer s money the EU and the US should be aiming to reach agreement on their shared objectives Sechler Susan Thurston Jack The Shared Farm Policy Agenda in Brussels and Washington The German Marshall Fund of the United States 27 May 2005 back to contents The United States and International Affairs Publicists for Jihad David Frum Since the London bombings of 7 July 2005 the media have been publicising a great deal about how the Islamic communities in Britain are being affected by anti Western preaching emanating from some mosques across the United Kingdom David Frum hypothesizes that these same Islamic communities are being affected similarly by the anti Western perspectives being disseminated by mainstream European media services According to Frum in the aftermath of the London attacks British journalists have worked to publish quotes from disaffected young Muslims many of who protest of a Western doubled standard that reviles the killing of innocents in London while overlooking the killing of innocents in Iraq When these young Muslims view images of murder and destruction in Iraq they somehow do not blame the actual perpetrators but instead blame the nations and armed forces working to protect Iraqi citizens David Frum argues that while this blindness is largely self inflicted it is surely worsened by the willingness of much of the European media to pander to deep seated anti Americanism There are sufficient issues to be debated around the conduct of the war in Iraq without operating as the Jihadists publicists and without distributing false stories and denigrating the work and sacrifice of coalition forces in Iraq The concern in the UK and elsewhere is that Iraq has now become a metaphor for local resentment When the Western media blame and criticize the decisions of President Bush and Prime Minister Blair they do not appease the angry people in their midst

    Original URL path: http://www.ucdclinton.ie/newsletter_ta_vol1issue2 (2016-02-09)
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  • productivity levels then the gap between Europe and the US will start to narrow for the first time since 1970 The workers from the EU10 can provide much needed elasticity to Europe s labour markets while the EU10 member states provide new expansive markets for companies Pozen Robert C Mind the Gap Foreign Affairs March April 2005 back to top Marianne Unfaithful David Frum Jeffrey Cimbalo The recent rejection of the EU constitution by the French and Dutch voters has sent an unambiguous message to the leaders of the Untion We the People feel alienated from the European institutions The issue of the democratic deficit in Europe has finally found its place among mainstream voters The decision at the June European Council to enter into a period of reflection on the treaty was undoubtedly the right decision at this time According to David Frum and Jeffrey Cimbalo of the American Enterprise Institute AEI the French the Dutch and other Europeans have lost patience with the political system in Brussels which remain aloof Moreover the politicians and elites in Europe seem increasingly uninterested in the views values and interests of the very people they claim to represent Although Frum and Cimbalo disagree with some of the main reasons put forward by the non camp leading up to the referendum they do agree with the result The implementation of the Constitutional treaty in their view will only add to the problems of a distance Europe It would do so in four equally important ways First it moves power away from elected governments Second it puts a lot more power of decision making in the hands of unelected bureaucrats Third the EU parliament remains impotent and the power still lies with the EU Commission and finally the Constitution greatly expands the powers of the European Court of Justice an institution which Frum and Cimbalo argue is even less representative than the commission Frum David Cimbalo Jeffrey Marianne Unfaithful American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research 1 June 2005 back to top The United States and International Affairs A Pretty Sticky First 100 Days He has a majority in both houses of Congress He won the Electoral College and the popular vote in the recent Presidential election and many now feel he has political capital in abundance So why is President Bush having such a difficult second term It only took 100 days for much of the political capital claimed by the President from his electoral victory to be spent The evidence of the difficulties the President faces is everywhere On his reform proposals for an overhaul of social security there seems to be little or no support A Washington Post ABC poll shows support for reform at around 31 per cent Significantly this is lower than the support former President Clinton gained for his health care reform package in 1994 The President is still unable to get his candidate John Bolton secured as US ambassador to the United Nations and the economy has

    Original URL path: http://www.ucdclinton.ie/newsletter_ta_vol1issue1 (2016-02-09)
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  • Professor Liam Kennedy: Professor of American Studies at UCD | ucdclinton.ie | UCD Clinton
    and the Other eds Michael Patrick Cullinane and David Ryan New York Berghahn Books 2014 Magnum s Global Enterprise in Reading Magnum A Visual Archive of the Modern World ed Stephen Hoelscher Austin University of Texas Press 2013 Soldier Photography in War Photography Images of Armed Conflict and It s Aftermath ed Anne Wilkes Tucker New Haven Yale University Press 2013 with Stephen Shapiro Introduction All the Pieces that Matter in The Wire Race Class and Genre eds Liam Kennedy and Stephen Shapiro Ann Arbor University of Michigan Press 2012 1 11 with Stephen Shapiro Tales of the Neoliberal City in The Wire Race Class and Genre eds Liam Kennedy and Stephen Shapiro Ann Arbor University of Michigan Press 2012 147 69 Looking for America in America Where eds Isabel Caldeira Maria Jose Canelo and Irene Ramalho Santos Bern Peter Lang 2012 Seeing and Believing Public Culture 24 2 2012 261 81 Visual Blowback in Getting Closer Amateur Images and Global News eds Kari Andén Papadopoulos and Mervi Pantti Bristol Intellect Books 2012 159 74 A Compassionate Vision Larry Burrows Vietnam War Photography Photography and Culture 4 2 July 2011 179 94 Democratic Vistas in Pictorial Cultures and Political Iconographies eds Udo Hebel and Christoph Wagner Berlin deGruyter 2011 335 54 American Studies Without Tears or What Does America Want Transatlantic American Studies 1 1 2009 http repositories cdlib org acgcc jtas vol1 iss1 art9 Spectres of Comparison American Studies and the United States of the West in Reconfiguring American Studies A New Anthology eds Janice Radway Barry Shank Kevin Gaines and Penny von Eschen Oxford Blackwell 2009 American Studies Without Tears Rivista di Studi Anglo americani 2009 26 37 Between Exceptionalism and Universalism in Globalisation Political Violence and Translation ed Esperanca Bielsa and Christopher Hughes London and New York

    Original URL path: http://www.ucdclinton.ie/about_professorliamkennedy (2016-02-09)
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