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  • Media and the Arab Spring | ucdclinton.ie | UCD Clinton
    and digital culture of the Arab uprisings After lunch in the beautiful sunshine outside Belfield house photojournalist Michael Graae and Professor Liam Kennedy reflected on the challenges and impact of photojournalism on framing and recording the revolutions through a series of moving iconic photographs from 2011 The three speakers in the following panel offered insightful analyses of the networks created by social and new media including Twitter and Storyful The day ended perfectly with a refreshing splash of journalism blogging and political analysis brilliantly combined in Professor Scott Lucas s plenary that preceded the evening reception Sunday morning kicked off with an extremely engaging talk by Mary Fitzgerald the foreign correspondent of the Irish Times who discussed her experiences covering the different uprisings and the various obstacles that have faced journalists in this context Remaining within the framework of journalism the following panel included one of the editors of the Egyptian AlMasry AlYoum newspaper and a media presenter on Nile TV The first afternoon plenary extended the topic of the Egyptian revolution with two complementary presentations by Professor Caroline Rooney University of Kent and Dr Ayman el Desouky SOAS London on aura rhythm and the sacred in the visual and verbal media of Egypt s political transformations Text and image were also the focus of the stimulating last plenary on filming the revolution with papers that covered amateur videos YouTube filmography the Cinema of Tahrir and online reporting of Gaddafi s capture and death Finally the last plenary was both thought provoking and provocative as Professor Joseph Massad Columbia University used Macchiavelli s theory of the love and fear of the ruler to interpret Arab autocrats changing relationship to their people and the place of US foreign policy in this context The uprisings in the Arab world have revealed the increasingly forceful and transnational impact of the media in the Middle East and North Africa but they have also served to warn us that the media both traditional and new is one element in a complex web of political social economic and intellectual factors that only if brought successfully together can really and positively bring about a true Spring in the Arab world Through this conference we both looked back at these dynamics as they unfolded in 2011 and forward to the prospects of reform democracy peace and conflict in the revolutionary Arab world Programme Saturday 14 April 9 15 Registration and Tea Coffee 10 00 Introduction 10 15 Plenary A Kamel Riahi writer and journalist Tunisia and Rita Sakr University College Dublin Ireland 11 00 Panel A Colonial Legacie Filippo Menozzi University of Kent UK Grandchildren of Omar al Mukhtar Revolution Soundtrack and the Anticolonial Legacy Omar el Khairy London School of Economics UK America Culture Talk American Diplomacy and the Shift Towards Digital Natives 12 30 Lunch 1 30 Plenary B Michael Graae photojournalist UK and US and Liam Kennedy University College Dublin Ireland 2 30 Panel B Networked Revolutions Uchenna Alexius Ekwo Centre for Media and Peace

    Original URL path: http://www.ucdclinton.ie/MediaandtheArabSpring (2016-02-09)
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  • US-Iran Relations | ucdclinton.ie | UCD Clinton
    the US Arthur Miller Centenary Barack Obama Hope Change the American 2012 Election Global Diaspora and Development Forum Neoliberalism and American Literature Terra Incognita The Fight Against Hunger Media and the Arab Spring Bring a Tent and a Camera Videos from Occupy Wall Street US Iran Relations Ireland and African America New Realities Series US and Northern Ireland Colloquium Diaspora Strategies Encouragement Evolution and Engagement Conference New Ways of War

    Original URL path: http://www.ucdclinton.ie/US-IranRelationsWhatHappensNext (2016-02-09)
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  • Bring a Tent (and a Camera): Videos from Occupy Wall Street | ucdclinton.ie | UCD Clinton
    American 2012 Election Global Diaspora and Development Forum Neoliberalism and American Literature Terra Incognita The Fight Against Hunger Media and the Arab Spring Bring a Tent and a Camera Videos from Occupy Wall Street US Iran Relations Ireland and African America New Realities Series US and Northern Ireland Colloquium Diaspora Strategies Encouragement Evolution and Engagement Conference New Ways of War Insurgencies Small Wars and the Past and Future of Conflict

    Original URL path: http://www.ucdclinton.ie/BringaTentandaCameraVideosfromOccupyWallStreet (2016-02-09)
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  • The Fight Against Hunger | ucdclinton.ie | UCD Clinton
    General of Irish Aid gave a keynote address in which he reflected on the past present and promise of Ireland s role in humanitarian assistance In particular he underlined the commitment of the Irish government to three policy areas linking relief rehabilitation and development work strengthening international partnerships and supporting local communities to manage crises In conclusion he was optimistic If we work together on these three fronts I firmly believe that within a generation we can eradicate acute malnutrition and we can seriously reduce the extent and impact of man made disasters This was a significant statement of the government s strategic vision in the field and it established a number of key talking points for the conference There followed three panels The first considered the degree to which Ireland s present role in humanitarian assistance is due to our exceptional history as a small nation dealing with the impact and legacies of famine There were divergent perspectives on this Cormac O Grada of UCD warned that the term famine is too casually used to describe disasters involving hunger and too commonly exaggerated by NGOs and others with investments in the field of humanitarian assistance The writer David Rieff concurred noting that famine should not be conflated with chronic malnutrition and remarked that is not a model but a cul de sac for reducing hunger However Tom Arnold CEO of Concern argued that famine is not so readily used and misrepresented in the work of NGOS and went on to commend a number of ways in which Irish and US governments were working to advance food security and devise innovative programmes to treat acute malnutrition In conclusion he emphacised the important challenge of translating principles into actions Niall O Dowd editor of the Irish Voice was more fulsomely optimistic arguing that Ireland s role and record in humanitarian assistance is a story that needs telling in our age of austerity The second panel discussed the roles of government NGOs and private funders and how these interact Kevin Cahill MD Fordham University pointed out that UN bodies were been tasked with doing more with less and this was creating new demands on development work Greg Gottleib of USAID set out the evolving commitments of the US government in the development field particularly in relation to food security He underscored the need to join humanitarian work to development work to foster private public partnerships and for NGOs to act as advocates Amitabh Desai of the Clinton Foundation outlined the work of the Foundation in providing philanthropic capital to meet development needs in areas where governments were unable or unwilling to take a lead The panel discussed the complex relations between relief and development and the challenge to scale up programmes The final session focused on education culture and philanthropy Pat Gibbons of UCD noted that humanitarian action is poorly served by traditional educational disciplines and argued the need to create and deliver interdisciplinary programmes of learning and training John Harrington Dean

    Original URL path: http://www.ucdclinton.ie/TheFightAgainstHunger (2016-02-09)
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  • Terra Incognita | ucdclinton.ie | UCD Clinton
    basis hundreds of earthquake tremors can and frequently do take place there and the fact that the rate of land movement along the San Andreas Fault is said to be thirty three millimetres each year which is about as fast as our fingernails grow only serves to feed the imagination of what it must be like to live in Southern California As a result of this movement Los Angeles City Hall is now said to be 2 7 metres closer to San Francisco than when it was built in 1924 This restless place challenges imaginations because it is filled with seismic uncertainly with perhaps the only certain thing being the sun which always seems to shine there Terra Incognita acknowledges the connection between the shifting topography of the land the experience of living in constant uncertainly Through these photographs of both the land and the people the story of modern life pursued on this unsettled and shifting edge of a continent is told The earliest ways of knowing California through photography for the most part originated in the late nineteenth century exploratory surveys lead by geologists Then photography and geological science worked together to document the landscape of Southern California Terra Incognita can be situated within this visual culture At the intersection of these fault lines of photography and geology those nineteenth century images both negotiated and established a new way of imagining this place and for a short while at least those explorers thought they knew what there was to be known The level of unknowin and uncertainly about things in present times has unraveled what the nineteenth century expeditions had once aimed for and thought they had achieved a world where terra was cognita Those connections which were established between photography and geology in the representation of Southern

    Original URL path: http://www.ucdclinton.ie/TerraIncognita (2016-02-09)
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  • Understanding Conservatives in the US | ucdclinton.ie | UCD Clinton
    Camera Videos from Occupy Wall Street US Iran Relations Ireland and African America New Realities Series US and Northern Ireland Colloquium Diaspora Strategies Encouragement Evolution and Engagement Conference New Ways of War Insurgencies Small Wars and the Past and Future of Conflict Internships Media Newsletter Orientation Links Contact UCD Homepage Welcome To CIAS Click here to watch our introductory movie Prospective Students President Clinton addresses the Institute Sept 2010 Understanding Conservatives in the US A Conversation with Michael Graham In association with the US Embassy Dublin Monday 17th September 2012 1 2pm Report On September 17 Michael Graham a well know conservative talk radio host in the United States spoke at the UCD Clinton Institute for American Studies to an audience of approximately 40 people The topic of his talk was American politics Mr Graham focused on two topics the rise of and ideas motivating the Tea Party and the 2012 Presidential election He explained why Americans who are sympathetic to the Tea Party are angry about many developments in American politics over the last four years In particular he mentioned the federal deficit the government bailout of the automotive industry and concerns about what he and other Tea Partiers

    Original URL path: http://www.ucdclinton.ie/understandingConservatives (2016-02-09)
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  • Barack Obama, Hope, Change & the American 2012 Election | ucdclinton.ie | UCD Clinton
    Hunger Media and the Arab Spring Bring a Tent and a Camera Videos from Occupy Wall Street US Iran Relations Ireland and African America New Realities Series US and Northern Ireland Colloquium Diaspora Strategies Encouragement Evolution and Engagement Conference New Ways of War Insurgencies Small Wars and the Past and Future of Conflict Internships Media Newsletter Orientation Links Contact UCD Homepage Welcome To CIAS Click here to watch our introductory movie Prospective Students President Clinton addresses the Institute Sept 2010 Barack Obama Hope Change and the American 2012 Election 4th October 2012 at 5pm Seminar Room Clinton Institute Professor Matthew Whitaker ASU Foundation Professor of History Founding Director Center for the Study of Race and Democracy Arizona State University Professor Matthew Whitaker of Arizona State University gave a timely talk on President Barack Obama outlining the significance of the election of America s first black president and considering the issues that may decide the current election contest in the US Professor Whitaker who is the Director of the Centre for Race and Democracy at ASU focused on matters of race in the initial election and role in office of President Obama and contended that race still matters a great deal in the formulation of politics and political debate in the US This has a long history he pointed out taking his audience back to the US Civil War and the period of Reconstruction to argue that this set the blueprint for subsequent race relations in the US Notwithstanding the progressive gains of the Civil Rights Movement in the mid twentieth century race has a resilient and resonant presence in American culture and underlies the political tensions between red and blue states in the present day Professor Whitaker argued that Barack Obama has been a lightening rod for these tensions and

    Original URL path: http://www.ucdclinton.ie/BarackObamaHopeChange (2016-02-09)
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  • Future of multilateralism | ucdclinton.ie | UCD Clinton
    Bring a Tent and a Camera Videos from Occupy Wall Street US Iran Relations Ireland and African America New Realities Series US and Northern Ireland Colloquium Diaspora Strategies Encouragement Evolution and Engagement Conference New Ways of War Insurgencies Small Wars and the Past and Future of Conflict Internships Media Newsletter Orientation Links Contact UCD Homepage Welcome To CIAS Click here to watch our introductory movie Prospective Students President Clinton addresses the Institute Sept 2010 The Future of Multilaterlaism and American Global Leaderships In association with the Institute of International and European Affairs IIEA 30th October at 12 45 in the IIEA 8th North Great Georges Stree Dublin 1 If you wish to attend this event please register in advance at reception iiea com or by call 01 8746756 Profess or Robert Keohane About the Speech The juxtaposition of China s rising power and American economic difficulties have led many foreign policy commentators to conclude that the United States is in irreversible decline This argument is also extended to the multilateral institutions that the U S has fostered to maintain order in the international system Others have countered this narrative of decline by pointing to the importance of American economic technological

    Original URL path: http://www.ucdclinton.ie/Futureofmultilateralism (2016-02-09)
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