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  • Irish Association of Dermatologists
    HSE for the National Epidermolysis Bullosa Service has also provided the department with a dedicated nutritionalist social worker psychologist physiotherapist and occupational therapist In 1992 a total of 1200 outpatients were seen This number has increased to 7 600 outpatients in 2014 with an increase of 23 from 2010 to 2014 In addition the department oversees 400 day cases and 400 admissions and consultations per year Clinics The department provides Four outpatient clinics per week with nurse led clinics held conjointly during these clinics One joint consultations clinic per month in conjunction with University Children s Hospital Temple Street Dublin CUH AMNCH St Vincent s Hospital and St James Hospital One monthly multi disciplinary Joint Vascular birthmark clinic attended by dermatologists N 3 plastic and reconstruction surgeons N 2 occupational therapist N 1 and interventional radiology N 3 There is a monthly Ichthyosis clinic and monthly Systemic Therapy clinic Monthly Epidermolysis Bullosa multi disciplinary clinics Multi disciplinary Connective Tissue clinic with rheumatology every 3 months Thermography every 3 months Multi disciplinary Genetics conference every 6 months Other Outpatient Services Emergency drop in service Emergency biopsy service Consultation service to the Coombe Hospital and The National Maternity Hospital Outreach nurse visits for patients with Epidermolysis Bullosa Skin prick testing patch testing Phototherapy Camouflage Clinical photography Thermography Supervision and monitoring of systemic therapies Inpatient services The department has approximately 60 admissions per year with an approximate length of stay 4 5 days In addition there is active inpatient consultation service to another 350 patients per year Day cases There are approximately 400 day case admissions for surgical procedures which are predominantly laser therapy admissions The department has a pulsed dye laser alexandrite laser and nd yag laser to cover the different needs of the paediatric population Lasers in younger children are done under general anaesthetic and there is a separate local anaesthetic list for older children requiring vascular or hair lasers In addition the department offers a sclerotherapy service for children with Vascular Malformations led by Dr Mark Ryan Interventional Radiologist The day unit also accommodates infants starting propranalol therapy for haemangiomas and children with morphoea who require pulsed methylprednisolone therapy Call The consultants deliver 24 7 on call currently through a one in three on call rota Academics The department provides undergraduate and postgraduate teaching in addition to electives for visiting and international fellows The department is very actively engaged in clinical and bench research under the supervision of Professor Alan Irvine and is a world leader in the study of the genetics of atopic dermatitis The OLCHC eczema atopic dermatitis collection of patients is the largest resource in the world for the genetics of childhood eczema and has been used for several key discoveries in this field This research work is supported by over 3 million euro of current funding through several grants including those from the Health Research Board The Wellcome Trust and the National Children s Research Centre To date 3 students have received PhD degrees based on

    Original URL path: http://www.irishdermatologists.ie/about-us/dermatology-departments (2016-02-07)
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  • Irish Association of Dermatologists
    Dublin As a result of a further meeting between Dr Hall Dr Donelan and me in Manchester in the summer the date was arranged for 2 November 1963 in the Royal Victoria Hospital Belfast with Professor Ingram to give a guest lecture on 1 November 1963 This meeting was a great success and this was important because if it hadn t been there might never have been an Irish Association of Dermatologists or its formation might have been many years delayed It was agreed to have another meeting in the spring in Dublin and at that meeting to consider the formation of a Society There it was agreed to have the inaugural meeting in Belfast in October 1964 The Irish Dermatological Society was the name chosen I suggested we adopted the constitution of the North of England Dermatological Society It was agreed that Dr Hall was to be the first President and Dr Burrows the first secretary The inaugural meeting of the society was held in the Belfast City Hospital on 24 October 1964 Meetings were to be on the last Saturday in April in Dublin and first Saturday in October in Belfast The president and Secretary shall be elected every two years The subscription of each Ordinary member was set at two guineas Early Development Several events took place which helped to establish the society and put it on the map The British Journal of Dermatology BJD was asked to publish selected cases from the two meetings and very readily agreed This practice was stopped some years later The North of England Dermatological Society was invited to have a joint meeting and this took place in Belfast on 15 October 1965 Many distinguished dermatologists attended this meeting included Dr Ian Snedden Dr R Church Dr FF Hellier all Presidents of the BAD at one time In those days neither attendance nor expenses were high There is a letter from Dr Mitchell to the Secretary on 8 May 1967 asking for payment for the lunch at the University Club Stephens Green Dublin Twenty five people attended the lunch cost seventeen shillings each Sponsorship From an early stage sponsorship was important to the Society Over the years the Society has endeavoured to maintain a proper and ethical relationship with the drug firms At the beginning Glaxo Stiefel and to a lesser extent Imperial Chemical Industries ICI provided the major support Coming of Age A major advance came in 1978 with the first symposium sponsored by Stiefel taking place in Cork with Dr Donal Buckley in April 1978 There were four main topics Contact Dermatitis Prof Charles Calnan London Prof S Fregert Lund Sweden Dr Alex Fisher New York Photobiology Prof Colin Ramsey Toronto Dr John Hawk London Vasculitis Dr Neville Rowell Leeds Dr Terence Ryan Oxford Dermatological Education Undergraduate Dr J Burton Bristol Postgraduate Prof J Hare Edinburgh On 19 September 1997 I had written to Mr Denis Love at Stiefel stating We want to get off to a really good

    Original URL path: http://www.irishdermatologists.ie/about-us/history-of-the-iad (2016-02-07)
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  • Irish Association of Dermatologists
    research 2 Rogers Plate Awarded for the best Oral Presentation at the Autumn Meeting Specifically for clinical research 3 Poster Prize Awarded for best Poster Presentation at the Spring Meeting Oral presentations Oral presentations are delivered at a Registrar s symposium The Burrows Cup and a bursary is awarded to the best oral presentation of scientific research at the Spring meeting of the IAD The Rogers Prize and a bursary is awarded to the best oral presentation of clinical research at the Autumn meeting of the IAD Poster presentations Posters will be displayed during the meetings of the IAD Prizes also awarded for the best poster presentations at each meeting Abstract Guidance The abstract should include a summary of the study s aims methods results conclusions The work presented should not have been previously published and will not be eligible for subsequent submission for the Burrows Cup Rogers Prize at the following IAD meeting The applicant should be the principal author and have carried out the bulk of the work him herself Training Republic of Ireland Specialist Registrar Training Information There are currently 17 specialist training posts in the Republic of Ireland The standard training programme is 5 years duration during which trainees are encouraged to develop a sub speciality interest Out of programme experience can be granted to permit the trainee to complete a higher research dergree The curriculum for Dermatology HST training is available via the Royal College of Physicians in Ireland Figure 1 Dermatology training in the Republic of Ireland Key or equivalent degree optional The current National Speciality Directors in Dermatology are Dr Michelle Murphy Consultant Dermatologist in the South Infirmary Victoria University Hospital and Cork University Hospital Cork Dr Patricia Lenane Consultant Dermatologist in the Mater Misericordiae University Hospital and Temple Street Children s University Hospital Dublin Trainees Veronika Dvorakova Caoimhe Fahy Catherine Foley Susan Gorman Kara Heelan Eleanor Higgins Rosalind Hughes Lorraine Jennings Clare Kiely Maeve Lynch Aizuri Murad Sally O Shea Síona Ní Raghallaigh Muriel Sadlier Eoin Storan Saroj Verma Dmitri Wall Northern Ireland SpR Training Information Training Programme Director Dr Susannah Hoey The TPD sits on the Joint Royal Colleges of Physicians Training Board s JRCPTB Specialist Advisory Panel SAC Deanery Northern Ireland Medical and Dental Training Agency Northern Ireland Training Programme We have 7 substantive training posts in Northern Ireland They are linked to the Belfast Trust and rotate between the Royal Victoria Hospital Belfast City Hospital The Dermatology speciality training is 4 years Less than full time training is also available LTFT Trainees are encouraged to develop a sub speciality interest Out of programme experience can be granted to permit the trainee to complete a higher research dergree to MD or PhD level We follow the UK training scheme On completion of training the trainee is awarded CCT Certificate of Completion of Training Dermatology and their name is placed on the General Medical Council s Specialist Register The JRCPTB is a Federation of Royal Colleges of Physicians of the UK

    Original URL path: http://www.irishdermatologists.ie/about-us/trainees (2016-02-07)
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  • Irish Association of Dermatologists
    Barry Department of Dermatology St James s Hospital Dublin 8 Meetings Typically two meetings are held each year A paediatric dermatology meeting is held towards the end of the year This consists of a clinical meeting held in Our Lady s Children s Hospital Crumlin A scientific meeting delivered by invited speakers who have attended the clinical meeting follows this The second meeting is a scientific meeting delivered by invited speakers A registration form for upcoming meetings can be found here An application form to apply for RAMI membership can be found here The Jacob Medal Approximately every two years abstracts are invited from dermatology trainees to present original clinical and laboratory Dermatology research Selected abstracts are presented at a scientific meeting and the Jacob Medal is awarded to the best presentation as selected by a panel of judges Abstract submission guidelines An email notification is sent to registered members of the RAMI dermatology section and IAD members containing an abstract template and noting the dates of the abstract submission process Those interested in participating who are not members should email HelenMoore rcpi ie for further details Each abstract must fit within the abstract template and use the appropriate font and font size Ideally the work to be presented should be original and unpublished and should not have been presented at a national or international meeting A blind selection process will be used therefore identifying features such as names of hospitals medical schools clinics or cities in the title or text of the abstract should not be used Any author not adhering to this rule will be asked to resubmit The body of the abstract should include a statement outlining the aim of the study the methods used a factual summary of results and a conclusion If the abstract is

    Original URL path: http://www.irishdermatologists.ie/about-us/royal-academy-of-medicine-in-ireland (2016-02-07)
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  • Irish Association of Dermatologists
    brief overview of dermatology in Ireland is given below Skin disorders are common and affect people of all ages Skin disease may have a highly significant effect on personal or family quality of life through discomfort and disfigurement Some forms of skin cancer can cause death Having a child with an itchy skin condition can upset sleep patterns and cause significant family stress Many significant skin disorders are increasing in incidence In childhood an estimated 15 of the Irish population will develop atopic dermatitis and the annual incidence appears to have been increasing over the past decade Ireland has one of the highest incidences of skin cancer in the world and the incidence of malignant melanoma has increased on an annual basis over the past 2 decades Irish dermatology services are organized within the two political jurisdictions In both the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland common skin problems such as eczema acne and psoriasis are most commonly managed by general medical practitioners More significant skin problems are referred to dermatologists who are hospital based specialists by general practitioners The primary role of a consultant dermatologist is to provide advice to patients and general practitioners on diagnosis and care Irish

    Original URL path: http://www.irishdermatologists.ie/information-supports/dermatology-explained (2016-02-07)
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  • Irish Association of Dermatologists
    Committee Dermatology Departments History of the IAD Trainees Royal Academy of Medicine in Ireland Information Supports Dermatology Explained Feedback Information About Diseases British Association of Dermatologists Patient Information Leaflets Charles Institute Irish Skin Foundation National Registry of Skin Disease IAD Member Area Notice Board Dermatology Journals Open Studies Trials Contact Us Media Sponsorship News Events Latest News Events Upcoming Events Past Events Dermatology Explained Feedback Information About Diseases Feedback We

    Original URL path: http://www.irishdermatologists.ie/information-supports/feedback (2016-02-07)
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  • Irish Association of Dermatologists
    Information About Diseases There are a number of sources that provide high quality dermatology information While these generally provide up to date and accurate advice it must be emphasized that your care should be directed through your General Practitioner or Consultant Dermatologist Websites The British Association of Dermatologists BAD have kindly given permission to link to their patient information leaflets PILs below The American Academy of Dermatology AAD have developed information for patients This is available via their website and is also available via an app http www dermapp net The European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology provide information via their website The Irish Skin Foundation provides high quality information in addition to current news and events including research in the Charles Institute UCD The International League of Dermatological Societies ILDS is a non governmental organization in official relations with the World Health Organization It was formed to stimulate the cooperation of societies of dermatology and societies interested in all fields of cutaneous medicine and biology throughout the world It provides a very good means of discovering patient support groups and dermatology societies internationally DermNet NZ presents authoritative facts about the skin for consumers and health professionals in New Zealand

    Original URL path: http://www.irishdermatologists.ie/information-supports/information-about-diseases (2016-02-07)
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  • Irish Association of Dermatologists
    of Dermatologists Patient Information Leaflets Acitretin Acne Actinic keratoses Actinic prurigo Adalimumab Alitretinoin Androgenetic alopecia Atypical mole syndrome Alopecia areata Atypical fibroxanthoma Azathioprine Basal cell carcinoma Becker s Naevus Boils Bowen s disease Calcineurin inhibitors Care of vulval skin Cellulitis and Erysipelas Chondrodermatitis nodularis Chronic actinic dermatitis Ciclosporin Colchicine Congenital erythropoietic porphyria Contact dermatitis Cryotherapy Cutaneous vasculitis Cysts epidermoid and pilar Dapsone Darier s disease Dermatomyositis Dermatitis herpetiformis Dermatofibroma Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans Digital myxoid cyst Discoid eczema Discoid lupus erythematosus Dissecting cellulitis of the scalp Disseminated superficial actinic porokeratosis Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa Eccrine porocarcinoma Eczema atopic eczema Eczema herpeticum Epidermolysis bullosa simplex Erythema multiforme Erythromelalgia Erythropoietic protoporphyria Etanercept 5 Fluorouracil Folliculitis barbae Folliculitis decalvans Fox Fordyce disease Fumaric acid esters Fungal infections of nails Granuloma annulare Hailey Hailey disease Hand dermatitis Head lice Herpes simplex Hidradenitis suppurativa Hirsutism How to check your lymph nodes Hydroa vacciniforme Hydroxycarbamide Hydroxychloroquine Hyperhidrosis Ichthyosis Imiquimod Cream Immunisation Impetigo Infliximab Intralesional steroid therapy Isotretinoin female Isotretinoin male Junctional epidermolysis bullosa Juvenile xanthogranuloma Keloids Keratoacanthoma Keratosis pilaris Lentigo maligna Lichen planopilaris Lichen planus Lichen sclerosus Linear IgA disease Melanocytic naevi moles Male genital lichen sclerosus Melanoma Stage 1 Melanoma Stage 2 Melanoma Stage 3 Melanoma Stage 4 Melasma Mepacrine Methotrexate Mohs Micrographic Surgery Molluscum contagiosum Morphoea Mycophenolate mofetil Mycosis fungoides Necrobiosis lipoidica Nodular prurigo Oral corticosteriods Oral lichen planus Oral pemphigoid Palmoplantar pustulosis Paronychia chronic Patch testing Pemphigoid gestationis Pemphigoid Pemphigus vulgaris Photodynamic therapy Phototherapy Pilomatricoma Pityriasis lichenoides Pityriasis rosea Pityriasis rubra pilaris Pityriasis versicolor Plantar warts verrucas Polymorphic eruption of pregnancy Polymorphic light eruption Porphyria cutanea tarda PCT Port wine stain Propranolol for haemangiomas of infancy Prurigo nodularis Pruritus Pruritus ani Pseudofolliculitis Psoriasis an overview Psoriasis topical treatments Psoriasis treatments for moderate or severe psoriasis Panton Valentine Leukocidin Staphylococcus Aureus PVL SA skin infection Pyoderma gangrenosum

    Original URL path: http://www.irishdermatologists.ie/information-supports/bad-resources (2016-02-07)
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