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  • All News Items- Department of Education Anti Bullying Working Group
    Statements Parliamentary Questions NPAR 2005 2008 Messages to Staff 2013 ECRI EU Developments EU Decision on Racism EU Declaration on Racism EU Rome Declaration UN Developments Durban Review CERD Holocaust Memorial Day Holocaust Alliance IHRA Resettlement Introduction Process Resettlement Towns Statistics Vietnam Bosnia Kosovo 2000 2009 2010 onward Relocation Refugee Stories Resettlement Events Resettlement PQs Resettlement Debates Info for Migrants Languages Available Arabic Bengali Bulgarian Česky Czech Chinese Deutsch German Eesti Estonian EÌdeÌ Yoruba Espa ol Spanish Français French Hindi Hrvat Croat Italiano Italian Kiswahili Swahili Latviešu valoda Latvian Lietuvi k Lithuanian Lingala Magyar Hungarian Malti Maltese Pashto Polski Polish Português do Brasil Punjabi Român Romanian Russian Shqiptar Albanian Slovenčina Slovak Soomaali Somali Srpski Serbian Srpsko hrvatski Svenska Swedish Thai Ukrainian Urdu Information about Ireland Accessing Information Local Directories Local Libraries NGOS and agencies Citizens Information Family Resource Centre Online Public Services Money Advice MABS Census 2011 Citizenship Driving Education Education in Ireland Higher Education QualificationRecognition Intercultural Strategy Hijab Research Patronage and Pluralism Emergency Services Employment Get Involved In Irish Life Health Housing Information about Ireland Intercultural Fora Learning English Learning Irish Multilingual Information Education Own Language Qualifications Own Lang Police Own Language Crime Own Language Health Own Language Welfare Own Language Life Here Own Language Jobs Own Language Housing Own Language Census Own Language Privacy Own Language Volunteer Own Language Qualification Recognition Social Welfare Visas Voting Integration Events 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 Publications Our Publications Other Publications Academic Central Statistics Office ESRI European Migration Net Equality Authority State Agencies HSE Police Service Garda NESC NCCRI OECD Police Service Garda Sporting Organisations UNHCR Miscellaneous Useful Weblinks Irish sites Government sites NGOs Research Centres International Sites Useful Contacts Contact Us Translation tool provided by Google The Office for the Promotion of Migrant Integration does not take any responsibility

    Original URL path: http://www.integration.ie/website/omi/omiwebv6.nsf/page/AMOG-8Y4KZA16202213-en (2015-10-30)
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  • All News Items- Homeless Persons in Ireland, a Special Census 2011 Report
    Racist Incident Statistics Reported Racist Crime Equality Tribunal Cases GSOC Cases Press Council Ombud FRA Assessment ECRIAssessment Media Coverage Racial Profiling Ministerial Statements Parliamentary Questions NPAR 2005 2008 Messages to Staff 2013 ECRI EU Developments EU Decision on Racism EU Declaration on Racism EU Rome Declaration UN Developments Durban Review CERD Holocaust Memorial Day Holocaust Alliance IHRA Resettlement Introduction Process Resettlement Towns Statistics Vietnam Bosnia Kosovo 2000 2009 2010 onward Relocation Refugee Stories Resettlement Events Resettlement PQs Resettlement Debates Info for Migrants Languages Available Arabic Bengali Bulgarian Česky Czech Chinese Deutsch German Eesti Estonian EÌdeÌ Yoruba Espa ol Spanish Français French Hindi Hrvat Croat Italiano Italian Kiswahili Swahili Latviešu valoda Latvian Lietuvi k Lithuanian Lingala Magyar Hungarian Malti Maltese Pashto Polski Polish Português do Brasil Punjabi Român Romanian Russian Shqiptar Albanian Slovenčina Slovak Soomaali Somali Srpski Serbian Srpsko hrvatski Svenska Swedish Thai Ukrainian Urdu Information about Ireland Accessing Information Local Directories Local Libraries NGOS and agencies Citizens Information Family Resource Centre Online Public Services Money Advice MABS Census 2011 Citizenship Driving Education Education in Ireland Higher Education QualificationRecognition Intercultural Strategy Hijab Research Patronage and Pluralism Emergency Services Employment Get Involved In Irish Life Health Housing Information about Ireland Intercultural Fora Learning English Learning Irish Multilingual Information Education Own Language Qualifications Own Lang Police Own Language Crime Own Language Health Own Language Welfare Own Language Life Here Own Language Jobs Own Language Housing Own Language Census Own Language Privacy Own Language Volunteer Own Language Qualification Recognition Social Welfare Visas Voting Integration Events 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 Publications Our Publications Other Publications Academic Central Statistics Office ESRI European Migration Net Equality Authority State Agencies HSE Police Service Garda NESC NCCRI OECD Police Service Garda Sporting Organisations UNHCR Miscellaneous Useful Weblinks Irish sites Government sites NGOs Research Centres International Sites Useful Contacts Contact Us Translation tool provided by Google The Office for the Promotion of Migrant Integration does not take any responsibility for quality of translation Homeless Persons in Ireland a Special Census 2011 Report Latest Release of Census 2011 findings 07 09 2012 The Central Statistics Office have released a special census report on homeless persons in Ireland showing that 3 808 persons were either sleeping rough 64 or in accommodation designated for the homeless 3 744 on the night of April 10th 2011 Of these 2 539 were male and 1 269 were female The report examines the homeless population across a range of variables such as age sex marital status nationality general health and disability It also provides results on the level of education of homeless persons along with their economic status as well as providing information on entire families who were homeless on census night Please see below some extracts from the report which provide some details on the nationality religion and ethnic status of homeless persons in Ireland on census night Nationalities Predominantly Irish Of the non Irish homeless persons 553 people UK nationals were the largest group accounting for 139 persons There were 140

    Original URL path: http://www.integration.ie/website/omi/omiwebv6.nsf/page/AXBN-8XWEX5120547-en (2015-10-30)
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  • All News Items- Presentation by Ireland at Conference on Free Movement and Participation of EU nationals - Making it Work for All
    population had lived and worked outside Ireland at some time Our society is not perfect and I do not wish to suggest that racism is not an issue or that there are no tensions between the indigenous population and newcomers There is some evidence that middle class and working class attitudes do differ But for the most part we have proved to be a warm and welcoming home to large numbers of new EU and non EU residents This is so notwithstanding that we have gone in a period of 15 to 20 years from being a relatively homogenous society to a society with a substantial foreign born population There were 544 357 non Irish nationals recorded in the Census of 2011 i e 12 of the population This was an increase of 29 7 from 2006 17 of our population were born outside Ireland which means that 5 of the population are ethnic Irish who were born outside Ireland and returned This illustrates the continuing extent of personal experience of emigration which colours as I have said our attitudes to migrants It also illustrates the extent to which both temporary and permanent movement in and out of Ireland by Irish people has become established with a dynamic of its own Even during the boom years of the Celtic Tiger substantial number of Irish people emigrated to the UK USA Canada and Australia in parallel with even larger numbers of earlier emigrants returning home with their children and with central Europeans primarily Poles and others coming to Ireland Irish people contemplating moving abroad look primarily to the traditional destinations in the English speaking world UK USA Australia Canada This is an important factor We are highly mobile and the concept of moving freely is not a stranger to us but our primary reference points except for the UK are still outside the EU A common language is clearly a significant pull factor although increasingly more Irish people work on the continent In Germany obviously but also we are seeing some limited Irish movement to Poland How will the pattern of non Irish migration to Ireland develop The initial wave of new EU migration to Ireland after 2004 was predominantly of men in search of employment In 2006 there were 2 Polish men for every Polish woman living in Ireland By 2011 there were 32 642 additional Polish women and the absolute numbers were 55 582 women and 59 609 men The number of children increased from 4 500 approx to nearly 14 200 This is evidence of family reunification and of a population that is here to stay A similar pattern can be seen in the Lithuanian and Latvian communities If the Irish experience is anything to go by there will be a permanent cycle of movement between Poland and Ireland and many of our immigrants are with us permanently To support this point the recession has seen the return home of some recent migrants particularly Poles as making up the largest number but within that there continues to be a two way movement some people return home as work opportunities dry up in Ireland and open up elsewhere some come to Ireland to join their families and some new arrivals come in search of work and study opportunities Again if our previous experience of emigration particularly to the USA is a guide we can expect permanent trade and economic development to contacts to emerge for mutual benefit from these bilateral social and family contacts between Ireland and Poland Lithuania and so on How will the experience of migration develop in terms of societal issues Thus far we have avoided the extreme racial tensions that have emerged elsewhere in Europe We do not have a right wing nationalistic anti migrant party There are of course racist undercurrents but little tolerance for intolerance in public discourse How this will develop as second and third generation hyphenated Irish emerge is something for continuing care and attention but we think we can learn from experiences elsewhere We have made a conscious effort to integrate new arrivals Details of various programmes in that regard are set out in the paper There is an emphasis on supporting English language acquisition although our problems are perhaps less in this area that other countries might face given the dominance of English as the foreign language of choice in many of our source countries There is an emphasis on social integration through local community involvement and sport and on combating racism New communities will always form their own social and cultural networks but we are trying to avoid the creation of physical segregation in urban living spaces The system of public administration has adapted to meet the needs specifically the linguistic needs of new arrivals We have adopted a mainstreaming approach i e migrants access the same services as Irish people do The services have to adapt to the new cultural diversity of their client base A number of key departments and agencies have developed specific strategies to ensure that their services respond to Ireland s changed demographic in a competent and inclusive manner The strategies developed have included Ø An Intercultural Health Strategy Ø An Intercultural Education Strategy Ø Cultural and Arts Policy and Strategy Ø An Garda Síochána Police Diversity Strategy Ø An Action Strategy for Integrated Workplaces A key point is that it is the responsibility of management in each public sector organisation to ensure that services respond to the needs of the changing customer base Responding to the situation and needs of new residents is everybody s responsibility However our approach goes beyond ensuring access to public services providing translations and interpretation services for example other these issues are important and have been addressed We want to ensure that new arrivals have the possibility of participating fully in society and in community life For those that choose to become Irish citizens that includes voting in national elections and participation in political life Anybody resident

    Original URL path: http://www.integration.ie/website/omi/omiwebv6.nsf/page/AXBN-8XUJKX157535-en (2015-10-30)
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  • All News Items- Transnational Resettlement UK and Ireland (TRUKI) project
    Messages to Staff 2013 ECRI EU Developments EU Decision on Racism EU Declaration on Racism EU Rome Declaration UN Developments Durban Review CERD Holocaust Memorial Day Holocaust Alliance IHRA Resettlement Introduction Process Resettlement Towns Statistics Vietnam Bosnia Kosovo 2000 2009 2010 onward Relocation Refugee Stories Resettlement Events Resettlement PQs Resettlement Debates Info for Migrants Languages Available Arabic Bengali Bulgarian Česky Czech Chinese Deutsch German Eesti Estonian EÌdeÌ Yoruba Espa ol Spanish Français French Hindi Hrvat Croat Italiano Italian Kiswahili Swahili Latviešu valoda Latvian Lietuvi k Lithuanian Lingala Magyar Hungarian Malti Maltese Pashto Polski Polish Português do Brasil Punjabi Român Romanian Russian Shqiptar Albanian Slovenčina Slovak Soomaali Somali Srpski Serbian Srpsko hrvatski Svenska Swedish Thai Ukrainian Urdu Information about Ireland Accessing Information Local Directories Local Libraries NGOS and agencies Citizens Information Family Resource Centre Online Public Services Money Advice MABS Census 2011 Citizenship Driving Education Education in Ireland Higher Education QualificationRecognition Intercultural Strategy Hijab Research Patronage and Pluralism Emergency Services Employment Get Involved In Irish Life Health Housing Information about Ireland Intercultural Fora Learning English Learning Irish Multilingual Information Education Own Language Qualifications Own Lang Police Own Language Crime Own Language Health Own Language Welfare Own Language Life Here Own Language Jobs Own Language Housing Own Language Census Own Language Privacy Own Language Volunteer Own Language Qualification Recognition Social Welfare Visas Voting Integration Events 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 Publications Our Publications Other Publications Academic Central Statistics Office ESRI European Migration Net Equality Authority State Agencies HSE Police Service Garda NESC NCCRI OECD Police Service Garda Sporting Organisations UNHCR Miscellaneous Useful Weblinks Irish sites Government sites NGOs Research Centres International Sites Useful Contacts Contact Us Translation tool provided by Google The Office for the Promotion of Migrant Integration does not take any responsibility for quality of translation Transnational Resettlement

    Original URL path: http://www.integration.ie/website/omi/omiwebv6.nsf/page/AXBN-8XUJC51455225-en (2015-10-30)
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  • All News Items- Census 2011 Results Profile 4 The Roof over our Heads – Housing in Ireland 
    tables by selecting the data they are interested in and downloading it in an easy to use format for their own analysis Small area census data is now also available on the new census mapping application on the CSO web site Ms Cullen concluded Housing has played an important role in the economic fortunes of Ireland in recent years and this report provides important new information on this critical aspect of Irish life Further details on census housing results are available in the census small area data which is available in the new mapping application SAPMAP on the CSO web site Here users can find detailed housing characteristics for a wide range of geographic areas from county level right down to town electoral division and 18 488 Small Areas This mapping application makes all the census variables available at local level right across the country and is an important step in bringing the data alive in a fresh and exciting way making it easier for all to access Highlights of the report Slowdown in housing stock growth between 2006 and 2011 In April 2011 there were 1 994 845 dwellings in the State representing a rise of 225 232 12 7 on the housing stock enumerated in 2006 and giving an average annual growth rate of 2 4 per cent during the inter censal period In comparison the previous inter censal period from 2002 to 2006 saw an increase of 309 560 21 2 in the housing stock Significant increase in rented accommodation The number of households in rented accommodation increased by 47 per cent to 474 788 up from 323 007 in 2006 The overall percentage of households renting their accommodation rose to 29 per cent causing home ownership rates to fall sharply from 74 7 per cent in 2006 to 69 7 per cent in 2011 One in twelve households with a mortgage headed by persons not in employment The number of dwellings that were owned through an existing mortgage or loan stood at 583 148 down marginally from 593 513 in 2006 of these 50 792 households were headed by a person who was either unemployed or looking for work representing 8 7 per cent of all homes with a loan or mortgage Within this group 25 921 households 51 did not have anyone within the household who was at work Strong growth in apartments The increase in apartments as an accommodation type in Ireland continued between 2006 and 2011 with 177 587 occupied apartments in 2011 an increase of 27 per cent on the 2006 figure of 139 872 Apartments comprised 10 9 per cent of all occupied households in 2011 and accounted for almost one third of all household types in Dublin City the highest of any local authority area Smaller sized homes back in vogue Census 2011 results also show that there was a strong increase in the number of households with three rooms or less since 2002 coinciding with the high rate of

    Original URL path: http://www.integration.ie/website/omi/omiwebv6.nsf/page/AXBN-8XPFR812424131-en (2015-10-30)
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  • All News Items- Speech delivered by Alan Shatter TD, Minister for Justice, Equality and Defence at today's Citizenship Ceremonies
    the total number of such ceremonies to 55 since the first Citizenship Ceremony on 24 June 2011 There may be coverage of the ceremonies on the RTE news tonight For Information Retired Justice Bryan McMahon presided over the 09 45 am and 12 00 pm ceremonies while the Attorney General Máire Whelan SC is presiding over the afternoon ceremonies of 2 15 pm and 4 15 pm Ladies and Gentlemen As both participants and guests I am delighted to see you all here on this very special occasion I know that the granting of Irish citizenship to so many of you here today who have come to our country from a foreign land is a major event in your life It is a time of celebration a rite of passage and a moment for all of you to cherish It is also a solemn event for this State to grant citizenship It is particularly fitting that this Citizenship Ceremony is taking place in this wonderful convention centre with its iconic architecture This appropriately reflects the importance of this occasion for you as our newest citizens and for us as the host nation in bestowing this honour on you As Minister for Justice and Equality I have the legal obligation and duty of deciding who should be awarded the privilege of citizenship In doing so I have to carefully apply the citizenship laws enacted by our Parliament and consider the individual circumstances of each person who seeks Irish citizenship It is a duty I take very seriously as I am acting on behalf of all Irish people in deciding who should be granted the privilege of Irish citizenship Careful consideration is given to each citizenship application received and it is right that the granting of citizenship is marked by a sense of occasion that serves to underscore its importance to you the person receiving it and to us who on behalf of the people of Ireland grant it to you You have come to our country and have chosen to live among us Some of you have been waiting a long time for this day to arrive Today we welcome you to our nation as its newest citizens and we hope that you will continue to contribute to our communities to our neighbourhood and to our society As a people we have been enriched by your presence and in making you citizens of our ancient and proud land we are acknowledging the contribution you have already made Our ceremony today is greatly enhanced by the presence of Bryan McMahon one of our foremost lawyers recently retired High Court Judge and a greatly respected patron of the arts Bryan will lend great dignity to the proceedings in his role as presiding officer and his presence signifies in a very public way the importance and solemnity of the occasion I want to thank you most sincerely Bryan for taking on this task I would like to thank the Army No 1 Band conducted

    Original URL path: http://www.integration.ie/website/omi/omiwebv6.nsf/page/AXBN-8XNJ7P14481330-en (2015-10-30)
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  • All News Items- Students residing in Ireland from before 1 January 2005 - Probationary Extension
    Authority State Agencies HSE Police Service Garda NESC NCCRI OECD Police Service Garda Sporting Organisations UNHCR Miscellaneous Useful Weblinks Irish sites Government sites NGOs Research Centres International Sites Useful Contacts Contact Us Translation tool provided by Google The Office for the Promotion of Migrant Integration does not take any responsibility for quality of translation Students residing in Ireland from before 1 January 2005 Probationary Extension 28 08 2012 Background The New Regime for Full Time non EEA students commenced on 1 January 2011 The New Regime introduced a maximum residence period of 7 years for nationals of non EEA countries who were enrolled in an eligible academic course of study in Ireland The New Regime applied to all non EEA students who came to Ireland after 1 January 2011 and to all non EEA nationals who were already resident as students on that date Special provisions were made to facilitate students who exceeded the 7 year timeframe on the date of introduction These provisions have been extended on several occasions since the introduction of the New Regime to allow timed out students to complete their studies avail of post study pathways or arrange for their departure from Ireland As a final measure in assisting the transition to the New Regime a student probationary extension is being made available to those students who have been continuously resident in the State since before 1 January 2005 i e the student must have received a GNIB card during or before 2004 and for each year thereafter These new arrangements will allow eligible students to reside in Ireland for a further period of 2 years on specified conditions In addition at the conclusion of the two year probationary period those students will be eligible to apply for a more permanent status on condition that certain obligations have been fulfilled Eligibility Any non EEA national student who first registered their residence in Ireland as student on or before 31 December 2004 and who commenced their studies in Ireland on or before 31 December 2004 may apply for the special probationary extension Non EEA Students who are no longer resident in the State will not be eligible to avail of this student probationary extension In order for such a student to be granted the extension they must have maintained their residence as a student from first registration until the date of application for the Student Probationary Extension Any student not currently registered and with a significant gap in registration will not be eligible to apply for the extension Students must also furnish one P60 certificate that has been acquired within the previous three years In order to apply for the extension eligible students must also complete the form and Statutory Declaration for Student Probationary Extension which is available here Details of the Student Probationary Extension The Student Probationary Extension will allow eligible students to register for a two year probationary period During this period eligible students will be resident on a stamp 2 and their status

    Original URL path: http://www.integration.ie/website/omi/omiwebv6.nsf/page/AXBN-8XLD7510311828-en (2015-10-30)
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  • All News Items- National Heritage Week 2012, 18th to 26th August 2012
    Tribunal Garda Ombudsman Broadcasting Complaint Complaint re Newspaper Internet Complaint Racist Graffiti Racist Incident Statistics Reported Racist Crime Equality Tribunal Cases GSOC Cases Press Council Ombud FRA Assessment ECRIAssessment Media Coverage Racial Profiling Ministerial Statements Parliamentary Questions NPAR 2005 2008 Messages to Staff 2013 ECRI EU Developments EU Decision on Racism EU Declaration on Racism EU Rome Declaration UN Developments Durban Review CERD Holocaust Memorial Day Holocaust Alliance IHRA Resettlement Introduction Process Resettlement Towns Statistics Vietnam Bosnia Kosovo 2000 2009 2010 onward Relocation Refugee Stories Resettlement Events Resettlement PQs Resettlement Debates Info for Migrants Languages Available Arabic Bengali Bulgarian Česky Czech Chinese Deutsch German Eesti Estonian EÌdeÌ Yoruba Espa ol Spanish Français French Hindi Hrvat Croat Italiano Italian Kiswahili Swahili Latviešu valoda Latvian Lietuvi k Lithuanian Lingala Magyar Hungarian Malti Maltese Pashto Polski Polish Português do Brasil Punjabi Român Romanian Russian Shqiptar Albanian Slovenčina Slovak Soomaali Somali Srpski Serbian Srpsko hrvatski Svenska Swedish Thai Ukrainian Urdu Information about Ireland Accessing Information Local Directories Local Libraries NGOS and agencies Citizens Information Family Resource Centre Online Public Services Money Advice MABS Census 2011 Citizenship Driving Education Education in Ireland Higher Education QualificationRecognition Intercultural Strategy Hijab Research Patronage and Pluralism Emergency Services Employment Get Involved In Irish Life Health Housing Information about Ireland Intercultural Fora Learning English Learning Irish Multilingual Information Education Own Language Qualifications Own Lang Police Own Language Crime Own Language Health Own Language Welfare Own Language Life Here Own Language Jobs Own Language Housing Own Language Census Own Language Privacy Own Language Volunteer Own Language Qualification Recognition Social Welfare Visas Voting Integration Events 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 Publications Our Publications Other Publications Academic Central Statistics Office ESRI European Migration Net Equality Authority State Agencies HSE Police Service Garda NESC NCCRI OECD Police Service Garda Sporting Organisations UNHCR

    Original URL path: http://www.integration.ie/website/omi/omiwebv6.nsf/page/AXBN-8XDKU216115821-en (2015-10-30)
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