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  • CONTRIBUTORS « ICTM Ireland
    Analysis Karen has completed a part time PhD at SARC Sonic Arts Research Centre Queen s University Belfast under the direction of Prof Michael Alcorn Karen continues to have her Compositions performed throughout Europe and the US and is represented by CMC Contemporary Music Centre Ireland She is also a member of AIC Association of Irish Composers SPNM Society for the promotion of New Music SEAMUS Society of Electro Acoustic Music in the US IAWM International Alliance for Women in Music Association and a former member of the ICC YCC Young Composers Collective Niall Keegan was born in the south east of England and began playing Irish traditional flute at an early age amongst the community of first and second generation musicians in and around London In 1990 Niall began studying under Dr Mícheál Ó Súileabháin for a Masters degree which he completed in 1992 with the submission of a thesis entitled The Words of Traditional Flute Style He is course director of the new Traditional Irish Music performance masters at the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance University of Limerick and also teaches on the ethnomusicology program there He has given occasional lectures and taught instrumental classes at the Music Dept of University College Cork and University College Galway Sibelius Academy Dublin Institute of Technology Newcastle University Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama among others Return to Journal This entry was posted in Issue1 Issues Bookmark the permalink Previous Article Next Article 10 Sep ICTM Ireland ICTMIreland A programme of events for the SEM ICTM Joint Forum can be downloaded at the following address irishworldacademy ie semictmforum Expand reply retweet favorite 10 Sep ICTM Ireland ICTMIreland Really looking forward to the SEM ICTM Joint Forum in Limerick City next week 13th 16th September ethnomusicology ictm sem Expand

    Original URL path: http://www.ictm.ie/?p=532 (2016-02-16)
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  • ICTM Ireland Committee « ICTM Ireland
    and composer specialising in Greek popular music and jazz secretary ictm ie Michael Hackett Membership Officer From Dublin singer and bodhrán player Michael Hackett is a 2010 graduate of the Irish World Academy s BA in Irish Traditional Music and Dance In 2011 under the supervision of Colin Quigley PhD Michael completed his MA in ethnomusicology his MA thesis titled Singing Our Place Local Songs and the Performance of Place in Irish Balladry which focuses on the phenomenon of the social singing session common in Ireland The thesis investigates the processes by which local cultural identities are created and performed by singers and songmakers who regularly engage in the activity of social singing Michael has taught Singing and Bodhrán at the Irish world Academy and lectures on social singing he has appeared on Irish Television and Radio He is a regular performer at signing festivals in Ireland Europe and the US Michael recently embarked upon preliminary PhD research into the cultural historical geographical and social significance of community sports songs locally composed songs which celebrate and commemorate the successes of local parish and county teams who regularly compete in the indigenous Irish sports of Hurling Gaelic Football and Handball mike hackett live ie Dr Daithí Kearney Treasurer Ethnomusicologist geographer and performer Dr Daithí Kearney is a lecturer in Music at Dundalk Institute of Technology His research is primarily focused on Irish traditional music but extends to include performance studies community music music education and the connection between music and place A graduate of University College Cork and a Government of Ireland scholar IRCHSS his PhD thesis concentrated on the construction of geographies and regional identities in Irish traditional music His research interests include the negotiation mediation and construction of identities through music and the relationship between music and place Daithí has toured regularly as a musician singer and dancer with a number of groups including Siamsa Tíre The National Folk Theatre of Ireland and was Artistic Director of the The Cork International Folk Dance Festival 2005 An All Ireland champion musician he has recorded with a number of ensembles his compositions feature on these recordings In 2009 he performed for President Obama in The White House for St Patrick s Day celebrations In 2012 he released an album with Cork accordion player John Cronin which is related to a wider research project on the music and musicians of the Sliabh Luachra region As well as lecturing in DkIT Daithí regularly contributes to courses at University College Cork is an examiner with London College of Music and has also worked in Primary and Second level education He teaches with Comhaltas Ceoltóirí Éireann and continues to provide masterclasses on banjo group performance and the history of Irish traditional music treasurer ictm ie Dr Ray Casserly Communications Officer Ray Casserly is Resident Director of the Council on International Educational Exchange CIEE study abroad programs at Queen s University Belfast QUB Ray currently directs and lectures on the Society Conflict and Peace semester program

    Original URL path: http://www.ictm.ie/?page_id=10 (2016-02-16)
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  • Therese Smith – Fieldwork: Crosscurrents and Crossed Wires « ICTM Ireland
    Sep ICTM Ireland ICTMIreland A programme of events for the SEM ICTM Joint Forum can be downloaded at the following address irishworldacademy ie semictmforum Expand reply retweet favorite 10 Sep ICTM Ireland ICTMIreland Really looking forward to the SEM ICTM Joint Forum in Limerick City next week 13th 16th September ethnomusicology ictm sem Expand reply retweet favorite 28 Jul ICTM Ireland ICTMIreland CFP The online journal for ICTM Ireland invites articles for publication in its fourth Spring 2016 edition pic twitter com zs4E Expand reply retweet favorite 28 Feb ICTM Ireland ICTMIreland Day 2 of ICTMIreland annual conference with MusicDkIT great papers and discussion Expand reply retweet favorite 27 Feb Music DkIT MusicDkIT ICTM Ireland Annual Conference 2015 ready to kick off shortly with the postgraduate forum hosted by Professor fb me 6FkLtvrCy Retweeted by ICTM Ireland Expand reply retweet favorite 27 Feb Musicology Review themusicologyr ICTMIreland Please RT CFP for Issue 9 of The Musicology Review Abstracts due 27 March 2015 More details here goo gl xFjNQ2 Retweeted by ICTM Ireland Expand reply retweet favorite Follow ICTMIreland Recent Journal Posts Editors Preface April 9 2015 Jaime Jones Singing the Way Music as Pilgrimage in Maharashtra April 9 2015 Conor

    Original URL path: http://www.ictm.ie/?p=1623 (2016-02-16)
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  • Two Book Reviews – Adam Kaul « ICTM Ireland
    tunes 75 78 and tracing them forward in time or in one section 190 194 documenting the introduction of particular musical instruments into what we now recognise as traditional Irish music We learn not only about music in Ireland but also a great deal about daily life in Ireland Because of Dowling s thorough use of a diverse array of source material and his focus on socioeconomics we also have the privilege of hearing from the people themselves letter writers Ordnance Survey employees traveling the countryside or from the minutes of early Feis Ceoil meetings This is a very human history that lives and breathes Dowling finishes his book with two interesting chapters one on James Joyce and Traditional Song and an important one on Traditional Music and the Peace Process This brings his book to a close in the contemporary period Here history evolves into ethnography as Dowling recounts his own experiences immersing himself in traditional Irish music circles and daily life in Northern Ireland Dowling makes use of rich personal stories and interviews to chronicle the Troubles through the lens of traditional Irish music There is an elegant transition from the end of Martin Dowling s Traditional Music and Irish Society to the beginning of Music and Identity in Ireland and Beyond Following the introduction Fitzgerald and O Flynn s edited volume begins with a section of six chapters on Historical Perspectives and in fact the connections between the two books are solidified by the fact that Martin Dowling contributes the second of these chapters an essay that covers some of the same territory as his chapter on Music in the Revival in his own book although much more briefly here As they point out in the introductory chapter this book utilises an inclusive approach that goes well beyond the expected ideas about Irishness to include Britishness Ulsterness the formation of diasporic Irish identities abroad and recently accreted immigrant identities in Ireland The collection of essays Fitzgerald and O Flynn have put together in their volume demands a re examination of the dynamic identity politics in Ireland and the multifaceted expression of Irishness beyond the island The first section of the volume includes essays on topics that move the reader chronologically from the 1700s up to the Celtic Tiger era Boydell points out how inclusive the Anglo Irish in the eighteenth century were in regard to many forms of music even traditional genres Music had not yet become seen through the political lens we use today Dowling takes up this question of the politicisation of music in his chapter on the uses or the lack thereof of music in the Revival period There are also some very interesting passages on the development of the post Famine culture of surveillance here too The rest of the chapters in the first section analyse art music and composers and their fraught relationship with Irishness Edmund Hunt deals with the largely failed idea of a national school of art music in Ireland

    Original URL path: http://www.ictm.ie/?p=1654 (2016-02-16)
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  • Review – Brass Bands of the World: Militarism, Colonial Legacies, and Local Music Making « ICTM Ireland
    the repertory and style changed according to varying degrees of militarisation Heejin Kim explores the diversity of genres used by brass bands in South Korean military contexts arguing that even borrowed musics American popular music non Korean marches could be employed in the project of nationalism Suzel Reily focuses on the idea of adaptability in her thoughtful analysis of the bandas de música tradition of Brazil She too thinks through the paradox presented by Herbert as she looks at the various ways in which these bands have been institutionalised since the late twentieth century Recognising the need for these bands to have well defined performance domains in order to survive she argues that the same versatility that has allowed brass bands to adapt to a wide range of contexts across the globe can also be noted in the ways in which they have adapted to changing circumstances within a single geographic setting 101 The tension between tradition and change is most acutely described in Matt Sakakeeny s fascinating and ethnographically rich study of the New Orleans brass band tradition taking into account the Brass Band Renaissance that began in the late 1960s its modernisation also popularisation from the 1990s and a newer impulse to traditionalise For Sakakeeny the tension between traditional values and popular culture are at stake in a genre that is simultaneously extremely adaptable and hotly contested in terms that centre around the burden of representation 125 of the African American community He describes in particular the activities of one ensemble the Black Men of Labor articulating the ways that they negotiate the sustainability and respectability of tradition with more recent and popular stylistic developments The next three chapters move away form this thematic area to a certain extent and shift the focus more squarely onto that of community Sylvia Bruinders examines Christmas Bands in the Western Cape region of South Africa and considers the ways in which the displaced Creole population of used brass band performance to take back the public space of Cape Town through performances that underscore respectability Exploring both road marches and competitions she understands these practices as particularly significant for politically marginalised communities that stand in an ambiguous relationship to the nation Katherine Brucher s case study of the Sociedade Filarmónica de Covões a brass band organisation representative of many of its kind in rural central and northern Portugal focuses less on the politics of community and more on the process of community through banding Making and important assertion about this process she argues that the acquisition of musical skills cannot be separated from how a musician acquires social knowledge though the relationships between him or herself and the people he or she encounter 175 Gordon Ramsey s chapter on the Northern Irish Protestant fife and drum tradition merges the political with the social through ethnographic description Isolating a local band s yearly journey to Scotland he examines the group s journey as pilgrimage in Turnerian terms suggesting that the liminality of the

    Original URL path: http://www.ictm.ie/?p=1644 (2016-02-16)
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  • Book Review – Icelandic Men and Me: Sagas of Singing, Self and Everyday Life « ICTM Ireland
    Denmark after the Second World War and its effective occupation by the USA and UK The popularity of male choirs in Iceland has been remarkable perhaps even to Icelanders themselves and an investigation into what makes these choirs such an integral part of society across Iceland is long overdue Faulkner s study inevitably raises other questions too for example why are there not nearly as many mixed voice choirs and why are there so few women s choirs Informative as the book is the conclusions are as the author says dialectical not definitive 190 He does confidently state that there is a high rate of communal singing going on and it remains an important factor of everyday life As this research took place in rural North Eastern Iceland and this reviewer coming from the urban South Western of the country the amount and importance of singing to the subjects cannot be questioned However because of his line of work the author has undoubtedly spent more time with the music lovers part of his area than others might The sample size and relative population proportion of choir singers is not indicated At the conclusion the author wisely writes that he wants to urge caution in over homogenising the population of the country 190 The reviewer can only say from his personal experience with three other parts of the country and perhaps slightly different times both earlier and later that his caution is justified The reviewer s experience of his own life and his parents life are all quite different from what is described in the book and this is probably worthy of another research project but all stem from parts of the country that somehow evaded choir singing Even for such a small country with very homogenous population with harsh natural boundaries and a bad or non existent road system and a general lack of communication has caused a larger than expected diversity between parts of the country A very fast assimilation of modern society took place in the twentieth century and made the gap between generations incredibly big at times This means that even a little difference in place or time can become a bigger than expected difference in cultural practice The author s findings for his part of the country and his times are certainly not to be doubted Having said this male Icelanders appetite for singing in male choirs is widely known if not notorious and has been so since the 19th century and up to present times It should thus be safe to assume the research would apply to a significant portion of the nation What little has already been written on the subject supports the author s research on musical practise in North Eastern Iceland He has done an excellent job of documenting and analysing amateur musical life in a way that has probably not been done before combining methods from several different academic disciplines There are some spelling problems with Icelandic names indicating lack of

    Original URL path: http://www.ictm.ie/?p=1664 (2016-02-16)
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  • Korean Musical Drama: P’ansori and the Making of Tradition in Modernity « ICTM Ireland
    Um s PhD fieldwork in the late 1980s Her experience as a performer of p ansori is particularly evident in the descriptions of vocal technique 76 8 where exceptional detail is provided on the techniques straight voice fine voice teeth voice back of the neck voice and many more and styles of ornamentation snatching voice cutting voice rainbow voice black eared kite voice for example Ch unhyangga The Song of Ch unhyang one of the five main pieces of p ansori is consistently used as an example to aid comparison between versions in these chapters Although these chapters are based on fieldwork undertaken almost three decades ago her rich ethnographic account maintains relevance for p ansori today Um presents a balanced approach to the tradition that arguably may not have been as objective immediately following her early fieldwork The remainder of the writing is based on more recent research Chapter 6 examines the changing aesthetics of p ansori in relation to historical context ideology class and gender up to the present day The rejection and censorship of songs as the genre transitioned from lower class vulgar folk song through the middle classes to the upper echelons of society in the early twentieth century explains how a comprehensive repertoire of songs was whittled down to five main pieces by the middle of the century Chapter 7 is based on fieldwork among the Korean diaspora in China and the former Soviet Union In comparing two socialist contexts subtle differences are brought to light which might otherwise be disregarded when comparing socialist and capitalist nation states e g the Korean diaspora in the United States The rejection of the husky vocal timbre by second generation Chinese Korean singers 174 a fundamental trait of p ansori in Korea provides an interesting example of the changes in style and technique in diaspora Chapter 8 explores the recent diffusion of styles with a focus on new patriotic religious and socio political p ansori and the impact of digital and communication technology in the twenty first century highlights a wealth of areas for further research While this book represents an important addition to the ethnomusicological cannon on Korean music readers of this journal might also find it useful as a comprehensive account of a national musical tradition Um balances an historical overview of p ansori with detailed musical analyses that could only result from her extensive experience as a participant observer Initially coming from the perspective of a cultural insider Um explains how her ethnographic research and polite interrogation of practitioners reframed her own approach to and position in the tradition The latter half of the book situates this musical culture in contemporary Korean society where approximately one hundred people now receive a BA in p ansori each year 197 Scholars of other established musical traditions might benefit from her explanation of the blending of schools and styles where notions of locality and genealogy merged into a symbolic musical concept that underline s the practice and aesthetic

    Original URL path: http://www.ictm.ie/?p=1657 (2016-02-16)
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  • ICTM Ireland Annual Conference 2012 – Call for Papers « ICTM Ireland
    Next Article 10 Sep ICTM Ireland ICTMIreland A programme of events for the SEM ICTM Joint Forum can be downloaded at the following address irishworldacademy ie semictmforum Expand reply retweet favorite 10 Sep ICTM Ireland ICTMIreland Really looking forward to the SEM ICTM Joint Forum in Limerick City next week 13th 16th September ethnomusicology ictm sem Expand reply retweet favorite 28 Jul ICTM Ireland ICTMIreland CFP The online journal for ICTM Ireland invites articles for publication in its fourth Spring 2016 edition pic twitter com zs4E Expand reply retweet favorite 28 Feb ICTM Ireland ICTMIreland Day 2 of ICTMIreland annual conference with MusicDkIT great papers and discussion Expand reply retweet favorite 27 Feb Music DkIT MusicDkIT ICTM Ireland Annual Conference 2015 ready to kick off shortly with the postgraduate forum hosted by Professor fb me 6FkLtvrCy Retweeted by ICTM Ireland Expand reply retweet favorite 27 Feb Musicology Review themusicologyr ICTMIreland Please RT CFP for Issue 9 of The Musicology Review Abstracts due 27 March 2015 More details here goo gl xFjNQ2 Retweeted by ICTM Ireland Expand reply retweet favorite Follow ICTMIreland Recent Journal Posts Editors Preface April 9 2015 Jaime Jones Singing the Way Music as Pilgrimage in Maharashtra April

    Original URL path: http://www.ictm.ie/?p=709 (2016-02-16)
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