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  • Workshop program - Dublin European Institute
    Cancel reply Your email address will not be published Required fields are marked Name Email Website Comment Categories Commentary Council of Europe Democracy Legitimacy Public opinion Economic crisis reform EU Council EU law ECJ Eurocrisis Europe s neighbourhood European Commission European Council Summits European Parliament Eurozone governance ECB Fiscal Treaty Foreign and Security Policy Future of the EU Human rights Immigration Schengen Institutional Reform Ireland in Europe Justice and home affairs Legislative decision making National politics elections Research Single market Social policy Taxation Transparency Uncategorized Recent Posts Schuld I Stay or Schuld I Go Germany Greece and the Politics of Debt and Blame Ideology Morality and Rationality The Uncomfortable Bedfellows of European Integration Saving capitalism for the few or the many Social Democracy a Second Leviathan Money for Nothing Is QE increasing inequality Recent Comments Sean Daly on This time it s different The prospects for change in the European elections Miriam Cotton on Local and European Elections Populist Politics or Effective Problem Solvers Archives January 2016 December 2015 November 2015 October 2015 September 2015 August 2015 July 2015 June 2015 May 2015 April 2015 March 2015 February 2015 January 2015 December 2014 November 2014 September 2014 June 2014 May

    Original URL path: http://europedebate.ie/report-extracting-political-signal-online-noise-workshop-mining-online-content-political-networks/workshop-program/ (2016-02-10)
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  • Rethinking the Minimum Wage: The Case of Seattle City Council - Dublin European Institute
    unemployment rate was below 4 the minimum wage was 1 60 an hour but when converted to 2013 dollars at 10 10 was the strongest the wage had ever been in terms of purchasing power From 1980 to 1990 during the Reagan and H W Bush administrations the minimum wage remained at 3 35 while losing purchasing power A slight increase by Clinton then being frozen by W Bush followed by a few increases by Obama have left 2013 wage s purchasing power a third below France s 309 Given these data Obama s proposal to raise the wage 25 from 7 25 to 9 an hour likely won t result in a loss of employment 313 Since a minimum wage increase wouldn t negatively impact employment minimum wages should increase to reflect the loss in purchasing power As the gap between rich and poor continues to grow it s scary to think what its impact will have on our democratic society as super wealthy people like the Koch brothers are effectively able to purchase American elections But is 15 an hour the answer Piketty cautions against raising the minimum wage indefinitely as negative effects on employment eventually outweigh the positive effects 313 He argues that to increase the purchasing power of low paid workers in France where the minimum wage is similar to Seattle s current minimum wage of 9 32 it s better to invest in training to improve skills or reform the tax code than to increase the minimum wage 313 The minimum wage shouldn t remain frozen but an increase as substantial as Seattle s may be inviting the negative effects on employment to take their toll Early economic indicators show that 102 000 workers or 24 of Seattle s workforce will receive a raise because of the 15 minimum wage But other data show that 42 of surveyed employers were very likely to cut employees or shifts as a direct reaction to the increase 44 said they were very likely to reduce hours to offset costs 43 said it was very likely they would limit their future expansion in Seattle One in seven is very likely to close a business in Seattle So where do we go from here Ted Strickland governor of Ohio from 2007 to 2011 tried to live on minimum wage for a week His diet suffered he had to walk three miles in 90 degree heat to a meeting and his job and he emptied his budget after having to buy medicine less than a week in The fact of the matter is that 7 25 an hour simply isn t a living wage let alone for supporting an entire family If the increase to 15 an hour proves to be too high and employment is hurt as a result at least Seattle s actions have sparked the debate for higher minimum wages around the country Nathaniel Cohen is a political science major at the School of Public Affairs at American

    Original URL path: http://europedebate.ie/rethinking-minimum-wage-case-seattle-city-council/ (2016-02-10)
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  • 1174982_10200563944529498_160016177_na - Dublin European Institute
    Leave a Reply Cancel reply Your email address will not be published Required fields are marked Name Email Website Comment Categories Commentary Council of Europe Democracy Legitimacy Public opinion Economic crisis reform EU Council EU law ECJ Eurocrisis Europe s neighbourhood European Commission European Council Summits European Parliament Eurozone governance ECB Fiscal Treaty Foreign and Security Policy Future of the EU Human rights Immigration Schengen Institutional Reform Ireland in Europe Justice and home affairs Legislative decision making National politics elections Research Single market Social policy Taxation Transparency Uncategorized Recent Posts Schuld I Stay or Schuld I Go Germany Greece and the Politics of Debt and Blame Ideology Morality and Rationality The Uncomfortable Bedfellows of European Integration Saving capitalism for the few or the many Social Democracy a Second Leviathan Money for Nothing Is QE increasing inequality Recent Comments Sean Daly on This time it s different The prospects for change in the European elections Miriam Cotton on Local and European Elections Populist Politics or Effective Problem Solvers Archives January 2016 December 2015 November 2015 October 2015 September 2015 August 2015 July 2015 June 2015 May 2015 April 2015 March 2015 February 2015 January 2015 December 2014 November 2014 September 2014

    Original URL path: http://europedebate.ie/the-effects-of-direct-effects-an-analysis-of-the-problems-surrounding-the-implementation-of-eu-environmental-policies-in-ireland-and-how-they-might-be-resolved/1174982_10200563944529498_160016177_na/ (2016-02-10)
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  • The Spitzenkandidaten Plot: the European Parliament as a Strategic Competence-Maximizer - Dublin European Institute
    for a greater say in the politics of the state and as a venue for integrating powerful social movements into the political system By contrast the EP does not have the power to tax it does not engage in redistributive policies and it does not have the broad and powerful popular support that it would need to put political pressure on Europe s governments The EP has benefited from two alternative mechanisms of parliamentarization its normative bargaining power resulting from the EU s the need to provide democratic legitimacy for supranational integration and its inter institutional bargaining power resulting from its cohesion and time horizon as an institutional actor First the increasing pooling and delegation of national sovereignty in European integration has undermined the indirect democratic legitimacy on which the European Communities had initially rested Democratically elected governments could be outvoted and national parliaments lost power in the process Because representative parliamentary democracy is the accepted normative standard of legitimacy in Europe a coalition of members of parliament and like minded integration friendly governments has therefore pushed for compensation by empowering the EP Most famously the introduction and expansion of qualified majority voting in the Council has been linked to the introduction and expansion of co decision rights of the EP Governments have felt normatively compelled to make such concessions to the EP even though they reduced their own decision making power Second the EP has used the concessions it received in European treaties to bargain for more competences subsequently The EP has benefited from a long time horizon it is elected for five years whereas Council presidencies rotate every six months a smaller sensitivity to failure failures are attributed to governments not the EP and strong cohesion in institutional affairs a super grand coalition of the EP supports the expansion of its competences whereas governments are often split on this issue As a consequence the EP has been able to expand its competences incrementally in return for its consent to decisions and policies the Council was eager to have The Spitzenkandidaten plot fits this time honored pattern of institutional conflict in the EU The Treaty on European Union reserves the right to appoint the President of the European Commission to the European Council i e the heads of state and government of the member states Whereas the Treaty obliges the European Council to take into account the elections of the EP and to seek approval by a majority of the EP the EP cannot formally propose its own candidate The nomination of Spitzenkandidaten was designed to bypass this constraint Providing its own candidate with the democratic legitimacy conveyed by the vote of Europe s citizens would create enormous normative pressure on Europe s governments above all those publicly committed to a democratic European Union to nominate the elected candidate to accept informally if not formally the EP s parliamentary competence to appoint the EU s executive Should normative power not suffice the EP could credibly threaten to block any

    Original URL path: http://europedebate.ie/spitzenkandidaten-plot-european-parliament-strategic-competence-maximizer/ (2016-02-10)
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  • Leitrim’s Great Decline: Income, Wealth and Population - Dublin European Institute
    25 057 Central Statistics Office 2014 During the boom years the opposite effect was seen Increased investment in infrastructure from the 1990 s saw rising incomes and wealth the population depicted its first rise in 161 years increasing to 25 799 in 2002 growing to 31 798 by 2011 with Carrick On Shannon one of the fastest growing towns in the country Central Statistics Office 2014 However the effects of the global economic crisis on Leitrim have been harsh with 20 3 unemployed in 2011 graph below the economic outlook of the county is once again in line with its more natural grey bleak landscape While the unemployment rate is seen to be falling throughout the country this is but a mask as the recent rise in emigration takes individuals off the live register thus creating a false government favouring statistic Source Central Statistics Office 2014 This is in the main due to the economies stagnation and high private indebtedness in the whole country During the boom years Leitrim natives continued to leave especially the youth and educated 3 with the growth not really taking account of this Most in migration represented individuals who are not Irish natives or returning emigrants Job losses have also been pronounced Bank of America previously MBNA Masonite and Quinn formerly major employers in the county have cut large amounts of jobs or in the latter case collapsed due to the Anglo charade elevating Leitrim s unemployment Most importantly is the deficiency of SME s due to high private debts as a result of the boom years damaging the local economy causing job losses absence of job creation and a rise in migration from the county again 4 The result has been raising migration towards urban centres such as Dublin and more significantly emigration especially amongst the county s youth to primarily the USA Canada Australia and the UK Every family has a member or numerous members that are permanently working and residing throughout the globe The current investment in the county s infrastructure or industry is as is the norm meagre and the outlook is bleak for the county with the lowest population which has a strong possibility of returning to its more traditional negative trajectory The example of the townland of Liscallyroan paints a stark picture the effects of all the above variables on the population in the county from 1841 to the present In 1841 Liscallyroan had a population of 159 people living in 26 separate households on 151 acres within the next decade that population had fallen to 67 people in 14 households a fall of 57 8 Enhanced British Parliamentary Papers on Ireland 1881 Currently approximately 20 people live here permanently Due to rising population and limited supply of land demand on land exceeded supply with labour becoming increasingly intensive Resultantly marginal output from additional unit of input begins to diminish and falling incomes The effects were that many perished and were forced to emigrate from this townland 5 and

    Original URL path: http://europedebate.ie/leitrims-great-decline-income-wealth-population/ (2016-02-10)
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  • Frank Schimmelfennig - Dublin European Institute
    affairs Legislative decision making National politics elections Research Single market Social policy Taxation Transparency Uncategorized Recent Posts Schuld I Stay or Schuld I Go Germany Greece and the Politics of Debt and Blame Ideology Morality and Rationality The Uncomfortable Bedfellows of European Integration Saving capitalism for the few or the many Social Democracy a Second Leviathan Money for Nothing Is QE increasing inequality Recent Comments Sean Daly on This time

    Original URL path: http://europedebate.ie/spitzenkandidaten-plot-european-parliament-strategic-competence-maximizer/frank-schimmelfennig/ (2016-02-10)
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  • Two new permanent positions in UCD SPIRe - Dublin European Institute
    the work of colleagues specializing in international relations human rights conflict and development studies and to develop links with the college wider university and external bodies Note It is envisaged appointments will commence in January 2015 but earlier start date s will be considered 2013 2010 Lecturer ATB Salary Scale 50 807 76 936 per annum 2013 2011 Lecturer ATB Salary Scale 45 726 69 275 per annum Subject to all new entrants to public sector as of 01 January 2011 Appointment will be made on scale and in accordance with the Department of Finance guidelines Prior to application further information including application procedure should be obtained from the UCD Job Vacancies website http www ucd ie hr jobvacancies Closing date 17 00hrs on Monday 16 th June 2014 GMT Applications must be submitted by the closing date and time specified Any applications which are still in progress at the closing time of 17 00hrs on the specified closing date will be cancelled automatically by the system UCD do not accept late applications Posted in Uncategorized Post navigation The Spitzenkandidaten Plot the European Parliament as a Strategic Competence Maximizer The absence of national adjustment tools is the reason why Eurozone countries continue to struggle Leave a Reply Cancel reply Your email address will not be published Required fields are marked Name Email Website Comment Categories Commentary Council of Europe Democracy Legitimacy Public opinion Economic crisis reform EU Council EU law ECJ Eurocrisis Europe s neighbourhood European Commission European Council Summits European Parliament Eurozone governance ECB Fiscal Treaty Foreign and Security Policy Future of the EU Human rights Immigration Schengen Institutional Reform Ireland in Europe Justice and home affairs Legislative decision making National politics elections Research Single market Social policy Taxation Transparency Uncategorized Recent Posts Schuld I Stay or Schuld I

    Original URL path: http://europedebate.ie/two-new-permanent-positions-ucd-spire/ (2016-02-10)
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  • Public Debt: The Paradox of Free-Market Democracy? - Dublin European Institute
    Streeck 2010 p 5 The accumulation of policy legacies has been perceived by some such as Streeck and Olson as a process of institutional ageing Streeck 2010 p 5 Essentially by introducing time as a causal factor when analysing institutional change it can be anticipated that democracies become more limited in their options for redistributing available resources according to the length of time that such democracies have been in existence Streeck 2010 p 5 For example Streeck argues that although tax increases would temporarily halt institutional ageing it would be difficult for governments to introduce tax increases in older democracies where there may be an even greater build up of policy legacies because these tax increases are then being used to pay off public debt and do not directly benefit the citizens who are asked to foot the bill Streeck 2010 p 5 Thus the gradual accumulation of policy legacies under the constraint of liberalized capital markets inevitably leads to greater instability and can undermine or even subvert democracy itself Streeck 2010 p 5 The inability of national governments to prevent increasing public debt accumulation and rising inequality is central to the implicit conflict between market forces and democratic society or capitalism and democracy Chua 2000 p 315 As Adam Smith contends For every one rich man there must be at least five hundred poor The affluence of the rich excites the indignation of the poor who are often both driven by want and prompted by envy to invade his possessions Chua 2000 p 315 In essence the contrast between free markets that allow for the concentration of enormous wealth and democracies which provide universal suffrage and politically empower the poor inevitably leads to social tension to varying degrees Chua 2000 p 315 In the US and Europe the erosion of democracy has led arguably to citizens voicing their discontent through electoral means such as voting for more radical parties such as the Tea Party U K I P and the Golden Dawn party as well as through public demonstrations lobbying and street protests such as the Occupy Wall Street movement Streeck 2011 p 1 Likewise in more newly developing democracies such as Indonesia a combined simultaneous pursuit of rapid marketisation and democratisation in the late 1990s led to just 3 of the population owning 70 of the private economy Chua 2000 p 315 This inflamed ethnic tensions and resulted in widespread protest dissent and violence and ultimately subverted Indonesian markets and democracy Chua 2000 p 315 In conclusion there is a pressing need for greater efforts from national governments and international financial organisations to resolve the fundamental inconsistencies between free market capitalism and democratic rights In recent decades the inability of fiscal policy makers global economic organisations and political elites to prevent rising inequality and the deprivation of low and middle income earners has challenged the democratic process Ultimately it remains to be seen if there will be any concerted effort by international and national authorities to reconcile the

    Original URL path: http://europedebate.ie/public-debt-paradox-free-market-democracy/ (2016-02-10)
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