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  • Debunking Myths: What Really Explains the Irish Economic Recovery? - Dublin European Institute
    Ireland for tax purposes Therefore the figures are undoubtedly exaggerated However recent data from the annual Forfás employment survey does suggest that there has been a rapid expansion in jobs in the computer services sector compensating for a decline in manufacturing jobs To put this expansion in a qualitative context Google established its Dublin European base in Dublin in 2004 employing less than 50 employees They expanded during the crisis and now employ over 2 500 workers Overall ICT services jobs increased from 2 900 in 2008 to almost 12 000 in 2013 In total over 104 000 full time jobs have been created since 2012 The export driven Irish recovery is real albeit somewhat exaggerated and it is primarily occurring in the high tech and high wage sectors of the economy leading some to conclude that Ireland is experiencing the side effects of a new emergent Tech bubble in Silicon Valley Provisional research by Brazys and Regan 2015 does suggest that Ireland is indirectly benefiting from QE in the USA But the important point to note is that this expansion of inward investment has nothing to do with the policies of the Euro area or the Irish fiscal adjustment It is the direct effect of a path dependent state led developmental strategy to attract inward FDi from large global firms in high wage high tech service sectors To explain the Irish economic recovery one must trace the role of the state in the development of high technology industries Or more precisely the role of the public sector agent the I ndustrial Development Agency IDA in attracting inward investment On the one hand this is related to low corporate taxes precisely what the EU wanted to challenge in Ireland but on the other it is related to the cluster effect of having a large pool of skilled labour with general experience of working in the tech sector and experience of the corporate culture of working in large US MNCs Once Google set up in Ireland they were soon followed by dozens of other companies and most of these companies source their multi lingual labour force from across the European Union The public policy story of Ireland s FDI development strategy has very different policy implications than what is being prescribed to Greece to get out of the crisis To begin with the industrial enterprise policy begins in the public sector not the market The core actor driving the Irish development strategy is an international network of low key but highly influential political actors in the Irish Industrial Development Agency IDA Furthermore the IDA are successful at attracting winners not because of a specific administrative state structure but because they have the policy autonomy to operate independently from political parties in government They were established in 1969 four years before Ireland joined the European economic community and two years after a free trade agreement was signed with the UK and specifically tasked with promoting and attracting inward FDi In the mid

    Original URL path: http://europedebate.ie/what-explains-the-irish-economic-recovery/ (2016-02-10)
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    Original URL path: http://europedebate.ie/wp-login.php?redirect_to=http%3A%2F%2Feuropedebate.ie%2Fwp-admin%2Fpost.php%3Fpost%3D66%26action%3Dedit&reauth=1 (2016-02-10)
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  • New post on our sister blog from Prof. David Farrell on different Electoral systems in use for the European elections - Dublin European Institute
    sister blog here Posted in Uncategorized Post navigation Cutting taxes is a largely ineffective strategy for attracting foreign investment The West Awaits Why the EU cannot Respond to Russian Aggression Leave a Reply Cancel reply Your email address will not be published Required fields are marked Name Email Website Comment Categories Commentary Council of Europe Democracy Legitimacy Public opinion Economic crisis reform EU Council EU law ECJ Eurocrisis Europe s neighbourhood European Commission European Council Summits European Parliament Eurozone governance ECB Fiscal Treaty Foreign and Security Policy Future of the EU Human rights Immigration Schengen Institutional Reform Ireland in Europe Justice and home affairs Legislative decision making National politics elections Research Single market Social policy Taxation Transparency Uncategorized Recent Posts Schuld I Stay or Schuld I Go Germany Greece and the Politics of Debt and Blame Ideology Morality and Rationality The Uncomfortable Bedfellows of European Integration Saving capitalism for the few or the many Social Democracy a Second Leviathan Money for Nothing Is QE increasing inequality Recent Comments Sean Daly on This time it s different The prospects for change in the European elections Miriam Cotton on Local and European Elections Populist Politics or Effective Problem Solvers Archives January 2016

    Original URL path: http://europedebate.ie/new-post-sister-blog-prof-david-farrell-different-electoral-systems-use-european-elections/ (2016-02-10)
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  • A Europe Made of Money: Book Review - Dublin European Institute
    throughout this period and monetary co operation was primarily considered a tool of foreign policy Most EEC states with the exception of the UK agreed to shift their domestic polices to promote low inflation The author details the interplay between technical and political debates and their culmination in a Dutch initiative the Duisenberg proposals The Dutch proposal introduced some new ideas into EEC monetary debates but the main effect was to get national governments to think beyond the rigid demarcation between snake and non snake members The author convincingly argues that it was the succession of new EU council meetings from Copenhagen to Bremen in 1978 that mattered most in shaping the final consensus on the EMS The Commission certainly played a new leadership position on monetary issues but the technical work had been thrashed out by a small number of individuals in specialised committees and informal working groups particularly those nominated by heads of government The political will necessary to forge a technical idea into an agreed monetary policy ultimately came from Britain s self exclusion and German acceptance The author concludes that the EMS was really an extension of the Snake and a recycling of ill fated proposals rather than a new economic breakthrough The new exchange rate system reflected the core policy preference of the Bundesbank particularly a consensus on stability oriented economic policies and the fight against inflation The French Irish and Italian governments all signed up to a monetary regime that would provide an anchor for their new approach to domestic stability oriented economic management Germany compromised very little and reflected in their refusal to countenance any form of federal based resource transfers via the EEC budget The final outcome ultimately reflected the distribution of power amongst EEC member states although the author does not state it as such because he interprets the politics of monetary co operation as a process of social learning There are two problems with this book First the author underestimates the importance of domestic material interests in the creation of EMS Political elites certainly mattered but whether the politics of co operation was a process of social learning is highly questionable One could easily interpret the evidence that the outcome was driven by the bargaining power of Franco German elites devising monetary policies in the material interests of their domestic economic and political constituents It should come as no surprise that the consensus that eventually emerged was based on a Bundesbank inspired conservativism that effectively ignored the importance of redistribution and budgetary transfers In this regard it is hard to see who was actually learning but it is clear to see which interests dominated the process The EU council certainly had a role to play to framing the debate But it begs a further question was it the EU Council in itself or influential heads of government that mattered most That is was the EU Council an instrument for domestic interests or transnational ones The economic arguments put forward by

    Original URL path: http://europedebate.ie/europe-made-money-book-review/ (2016-02-10)
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  • Event: Disarmament and Non-Proliferation: Historical Perspectives & Future Objectives - Dublin European Institute
    Hiroshima in August 1945 A key note address will also be delivered by Mr Joe Costello T D Minister of State Minster of State for Trade and Development Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade and Ms Patricia Lewis Research Director for International Security at Chatham House London The symposium will be of particular interest to members of the Dublin European Institute as a key element under consideration will be the role played by Europe in disarmament and non proliferation matters Panellists focusing on this topic will include Ms Clara Glanstadt of the European External Action Service and Dr Andrew Cottey who will discuss Europe s soft power diplomacy and nuclear weapons The full programme for the event can be found here The event is open to the public and free to attend but places are limited Early registration by 27 March is required at disarmamentsymposium gmail com Hope to see you there The Irish Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade in association with The School of History University College Cork and The Embassy of Japan in Ireland Posted in Uncategorized Post navigation Video stream European Democracy in Crisis The convergence of interest rates in the Eurozone has fuelled rather than removed economic divergences between the north and south Leave a Reply Cancel reply Your email address will not be published Required fields are marked Name Email Website Comment Categories Commentary Council of Europe Democracy Legitimacy Public opinion Economic crisis reform EU Council EU law ECJ Eurocrisis Europe s neighbourhood European Commission European Council Summits European Parliament Eurozone governance ECB Fiscal Treaty Foreign and Security Policy Future of the EU Human rights Immigration Schengen Institutional Reform Ireland in Europe Justice and home affairs Legislative decision making National politics elections Research Single market Social policy Taxation Transparency Uncategorized Recent Posts Schuld I

    Original URL path: http://europedebate.ie/event-disarmament-non-proliferation-historical-perspectives-future-objectives/ (2016-02-10)
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  • Tamir-Landscape - Dublin European Institute
    affairs Legislative decision making National politics elections Research Single market Social policy Taxation Transparency Uncategorized Recent Posts Schuld I Stay or Schuld I Go Germany Greece and the Politics of Debt and Blame Ideology Morality and Rationality The Uncomfortable Bedfellows of European Integration Saving capitalism for the few or the many Social Democracy a Second Leviathan Money for Nothing Is QE increasing inequality Recent Comments Sean Daly on This time

    Original URL path: http://europedebate.ie/strategists-less-strategy-case-european-defense-university-2/tamir-landscape/ (2016-02-10)
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  • Studia Diplomatica LXVI-2 (2013)_Libel - Dublin European Institute
    Cancel reply Your email address will not be published Required fields are marked Name Email Website Comment Categories Commentary Council of Europe Democracy Legitimacy Public opinion Economic crisis reform EU Council EU law ECJ Eurocrisis Europe s neighbourhood European Commission European Council Summits European Parliament Eurozone governance ECB Fiscal Treaty Foreign and Security Policy Future of the EU Human rights Immigration Schengen Institutional Reform Ireland in Europe Justice and home affairs Legislative decision making National politics elections Research Single market Social policy Taxation Transparency Uncategorized Recent Posts Schuld I Stay or Schuld I Go Germany Greece and the Politics of Debt and Blame Ideology Morality and Rationality The Uncomfortable Bedfellows of European Integration Saving capitalism for the few or the many Social Democracy a Second Leviathan Money for Nothing Is QE increasing inequality Recent Comments Sean Daly on This time it s different The prospects for change in the European elections Miriam Cotton on Local and European Elections Populist Politics or Effective Problem Solvers Archives January 2016 December 2015 November 2015 October 2015 September 2015 August 2015 July 2015 June 2015 May 2015 April 2015 March 2015 February 2015 January 2015 December 2014 November 2014 September 2014 June 2014 May

    Original URL path: http://europedebate.ie/strategists-less-strategy-case-european-defense-university-2/studia-diplomatica-lxvi-2-2013_libel/ (2016-02-10)
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  • The Problem with Enlargement - Dublin European Institute
    still not recognised by five member states Cyprus Greece Romania Slovakia and Spain but conversely has been offered talks on developing a Stabilisation and Association Agreement SAA Rettman 2013 In Montenegro the Prime Minister Milo Djukanovic while compliant with Brussels in every other area has pursued oppressive media control with Montenegro being placed 113 th out of 179 in the latest Reporters without Borders Press Freedom Index Ivanovic 2014 Most worryingly is that Montenegro has been discussed as the next in line for accession after Croatia Ivanovic 2014 and looks set to be a situation similar to Bulgaria and Romania Iceland as a peculiar case applied for EU membership in 2009 European Commission Enlargement 2014 but abandoned talks in 2013 due to issues over fisheries Pop 2013 but less explicitly over disputes with EU member states the UK and the Netherlands over repayment of deposits lost in the Icelandic financial crash in 2008 Juncos A E and Pérez Solórzano Borragán N 2013 However one of the most contentious and peculiar of the candidate countries is Turkey Turkey has been pursuing membership of the EU since 1987 European Commission Enlargement 2014 and was only recognised by the Helsinki European Council in December 1999 as eligible for candidate status Juncos A E and Pérez Solórzano Borragán N 2013 Firstly Turkey s European identity has been called into question Juncos A E and Pérez Solórzano Borragán N 2013 and member states Germany and Austria are reluctant to accept its accession at all Mahony 2013 Secondly geographically Turkey is further east than the EU has ever ventured The new borders created by Turkey s accession would create innumerable problems It would give the EU a direct border to Georgia and to Syria both significant locations for Russian naval activities Russia s dominance in the Black Sea would be called into question and if recent events in the Ukraine are anything to go by this could cause an outburst of violence in the region On another front eastern Turkey juts deep into the Middle East even sharing a border with the region s easternmost country Iran Finally there is the undeniable fact that Turkey does not even begin to reach the standards of the Copenhagen criteria Disregard for human rights violent police reactions to anti government protests Nielsen 2013 and an intense crackdown on media freedom Fox 2014 are all in conflict with EU requirements What is more these issues have all occurred since EU accession talks began questionable developments that leave one wondering why the EU would continue to pursue accession talks at all As the European Union comes into this new phase of enlargement it will face new and recurring challenges Since its inception the EU has been regularly enlarging however it has come to a point where there is not only enlargement fatigue but there are very little remaining European States a requirement for EU accession as per Article 237 of the Rome Treaty Juncos A E and Pérez Solórzano Borragán N

    Original URL path: http://europedebate.ie/problem-enlargement/ (2016-02-10)
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