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    also Visiting Professor at MIT He has worked as deputy director of the Environment Directorate of the OECD consultant to the World Bank the European Union the OECD and the Asian Development Bank He has written a number of books on urban and regional development 11 45 12 15am Mr Jonathan Potter Globalisation and Decentralisation Dr Jonathan Potter works in the Local Economic and Employment Development Programme LEED at the OECD Paris He is responsible for LEED activities on inward investment financing local development youth entrepeneurship and financing entrepeneurship as well as the local reviews of entrepeneurship He is also manager of the OECD LEED Forum on Cities and Regions He has recently completed drafting an OECD publication called globalisation and devolution implications for local decision makers which addresses how cities and regions need to respond to globalisation to create competitive economies and inclusive societies 12 15 12 45am Dr Wendelin Wanka Integrative Urban Development Vienna example Dr Wanka Chief Executive Office of the City of Vienna City where he has been responsible for the organisation modernisation and decentralisation of the City Government for urban planning regeneration and European Integration Afternoon Session Implications for Dublin 2 30 3 00pm Ms Gina Quinn Developing Business and Employment in a Global City Ms Gina Quinn is Chief Executive of Dublin Chamber of Commerce which represents businesses across all sectors in the Greater Dublin City Area It is concerned with developing policy for governance transport overall development of Dublin and maximising enterprise and investment opportunities She is currently a member of the Consumer Board Bord Bia the Enterprise Policy Group EU Commission on Enterprise and Information Society 3 00 3 30pm Mr John Fitzgerald Growing the Population Stopping the Sprawl John Fitzgerald was appointed Dublin City Manager in mid 1996 He is Chair

    Original URL path: http://www.dublinpact.ie/conferencedetails/doublingdublinconferenceP2.htm (2015-10-30)
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    implemented through electronic space is one moment one fragment of an even vaster economic chain that is in good part embedded in non electronic spaces There is no fully dematerialized firm or industry Even the most advanced information industries such as finance are installed only partly in electronic space And so are industries that produce digital products such as software designers The growing digitalization of economic activities has not eliminated the need for major international business and financial centers and all the material resources they concentrate from state of the art telematics infrastructure to brain talent Castells 1989 Graham and Marvin 1996 Sassen 1998 chapter 9 In my research I have conceptualized cities as production sites for the leading information industries of our time in order to recover the infrastructure of activities firms and jobs that is necessary to run the advanced corporate economy including its globalized sectors These industries are typically conceptualized in terms of the hypermobility of their outputs and the high levels of expertise of their professionals rather than in terms of the production process involved and the requisite infrastructure of facilities and non expert jobs that are also part of these industries A detailed analysis of service based urban economies shows that there is considerable articulation of firms sectors and workers who may appear as though they have little connection to an urban economy dominated by finance and specialized services but in fact fulfill a series of functions that are an integral part of that economy They do so however under conditions of sharp social earnings and often racial ethnic segmentation Sassen 2000a chapters 8 and 9 In the day to day work of the leading services complex dominated by finance a large share of the jobs involved are lowly paid and manual many held by

    Original URL path: http://www.dublinpact.ie/conferencedetails/ConferenceReview/speakers/saskiasassen/saskiasassen2.html (2015-10-30)
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    of firms vary considerably It is not simply a matter of reducing the weight of place The scattered evidence for the last decade which saw the widespread use of information technologies by firms in a broad range of sectors allows us to identify three types of firms in terms of their locational patterns First firms with highly standardized products services see an increase in their locational options insofar as they can maintain system integration no matter where they are located This might also hold for firms with specialized products services that do not require elaborate contracting and subcontracting or suppliers networks all conditions which tend to make an urban location more efficient Data entry and simple manufacturing work can be moved to wherever labor and other costs might be lowest Headquarters can move out of large cities and to suburban locations or small towns A second locational patterns is that represented by firms which are deeply involved in the global economy and hence have increasingly complex headquarter functions Perhaps ironically the complexity of headquarters functions is such that they get outsourced to highly specialized service firms This frees up the headquarter to locate anywhere so long as they can access a highly specialized networked service sector somewhere most likely in a city The third locational pattern is that evident in highly specialized networked service sectors It is these sectors rather than the headquarters that benefit from spatial agglomeration at the point of production These firms are embedded in intense transactions with other such firms in kindred specializations and are subject to time pressures and the constraints of imperfect information discussed in the preceding section Along with some of the features contributing to agglomeration advantages in financial services firms this has the effect of rendering the network of specialized service firms more place bound than the hyper mobility of their products and of their professionals would indicate Given the differential impacts of the capabilities of the new information technologies on specific types of firms and of sectors of the economy the spatial correlates of the center can assume several geographic forms likely to be operating simultaneously at the macrolevel Thus the center can be the CBD as it still is largely for some of the leading sectors notably finance or an alternative form of CBD such as Silicon Valley Yet even as the CBD in major international business centers remains a strategic site for the leading industries it is one profoundly reconfigured by technological and economic change Fainstein 2001 Schiffer Ramos 2001 Ciccolella and Mignaqui 2001 Further there are often sharp differences in the patterns assumed by this reconfiguring of the central city in different parts of the world notably as between the United States and Western Europe e g Kunzmann 1994 Hitz et al 1995 Veltz 1996 Second the center can extend into a metropolitan area in the form of a grid of nodes of intense business activity One might ask whether a spatial organization characterized by dense strategic nodes

    Original URL path: http://www.dublinpact.ie/conferencedetails/ConferenceReview/speakers/saskiasassenITandCities/ssITandCities2.html (2015-10-30)
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    deficit must not exceed 3 of the GDP and the total government debt must not exceed 60 of the GDP The revenues in 2000 have been for Vienna 121 billion and the expenses 131 billion Austrian Schillings Already 75 years ago Vienna s city fathers set themselves the task of making the whole town an inviting place to live in Light air and sunshine was the maxim and 65 000 commensurate flats were built within 15 years setting a housing standard which has held to this day Nearly 10 000 flats were built yearly in the nineties 65 000 in the last decade As of the seventies architects were encouraged to give buildings an aesthetic touch and often substandard houses of the boom period of a hundred years before were revitalized The City of Vienna is the biggest landlord of the world with 220 000 flats Especially in the past ten years also the construction of office buildings office towers has sprung up enormously In the face of new challenges and opportunities for instance rapid development of new technologies new requirements in the field of transport policy due to EU enlargement changing lifestyles and recreational preferences competition among cities and increasing globalisation the primary goal of integrative city development in Vienna is to ensure the best overall development This requires a continued proactive planning effort taking economic social and ecological qualities equally into account all of which contribute to make a city attractive Social justice and co responsibility viable economic systems for the future and responsible management of the natural environment constitute the main pillars of strategy for Vienna For this reason a Strategy Plan under the motto Committed to quality innovative Strategies for Vienna Qualität verpfichtet Innovationen für Wien was drawn up in the year 2000 This plan was

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    Project which will have immediate impact on water quality in the bay and its environs will finish in the middle of next year On Waste Management another key issue we have made significant progress over the last twelve months including extensive expansion of city clean up which is long overdue Our objective is to provide enough resources to bring cleanliness in the city up to European standards within the next twelve months We still have a long way to go to meet best Europeans standards in terms of waste management and recycling however we have got off to a good start and implementation of the waste strategy for the Dublin Region is intact including proposals for a Waste to Energy plant at Poolbeg Things are improving for example three years ago we were still deciding whether to refurbish or rebuild Ballymun We have seen phenomenal progress there since the decision to go Three years ago nobody believed light rail would happen though it has limited capacity for traffic improvement it will alter fundamentally the image of public transport and the image of the city and will lend itself to future expansion for example in the fairly near future fifty thousand workers in the IFSC will have eight minute access on Luas to the city centre at lunchtime Again less than four years ago the port tunnel had still not been included in the Dublin City Development Plan we are now on site Civic Leadership and Civic Pride City Government must give leadership in civic improvements for example the Boardwalk Smithfield the Book Market on Capel Street Bridge the Ha penny Bridge and the Millennium Foot Bridge Also the Calatrava Bridges and restoration of City Hall Outside the city centre regeneration of run down housing areas and older villages is continuing

    Original URL path: http://www.dublinpact.ie/conferencedetails/ConferenceReview/speakers/John%20Fitzgerald/johnfitzgerald2.html (2015-10-30)
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    the media and perpetuated through the various national institutions both public and private that control opinion and resources Most of the national media have continued to portray whole sections of the city as less desirable despite the fact that the housing shortage has resulted in increasing numbers purchasing homes in the so called less desirable areas They have also tended to ignore the serious social problems except for when treat them in a sensational way There is an accumulation of problems that have occurred in these neighbourhoods over a prolonged period Among the main issues identified are inadequate education provision poor public service delivery the deterioration of the lived environment housing conditions lack of leisure facilities the transport system standards of community care and health services for the young and old community safety and policing There was some hope and expectation that the approach to national partnership would result in a significant redirection of income and resources to the cities To be fair to those involved in the agreements there have been a number of attempts to alter the present policy in favour of addressing the specifically urban issues in a more coherent and sustainable manner However the actions taken to date have not yet resulted in major change and maybe this was never an option State policy tends to progress on an incremental basis and rarely succeeds in achieving a noticeable shift In addition in Ireland I would suggest there is a prevailing mind set that views the small town and rural environment as the preferable location This is despite the fact that the majority now live in cities and larger urban areas This view has influenced the strategy or lack of it on urban policy A key issue in relation to promoting and achieving inclusion for the majority

    Original URL path: http://www.dublinpact.ie/conferencedetails/ConferenceReview/speakers/Dave%20Connolly/daveconnolly2.html (2015-10-30)
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    many of the recently emerging sectors have tended to locate at suburban and office park type locations While the process of economic globalisation has presented the region with significant opportunities the future and continuing economic development of the region is also threatened by global exposure of the export orientated sectors in the face of economic downturn Nevertheless there remains a broad consensus to develop a high knowledge based and high technology based productive sector The trend at end of 2001 is that while the new economy downturn has resulted in job losses and closures such as Gateway Motorola and others the current skills and labour shortages have seen significant numbers of such staff re employed elsewhere Whether this scenario continues if the IT sector restructuring accelerates is of course open to question The previous absence of a definite regional strategy or plan for the development of land use and transportation in the Dublin city region has seen economic and population growth occurring in a strategically uncontrolled manner In particular the failure to meet the regions expanding infrastructural requirements is now placing constraints on the economic potential of the region What emerges is a picture of consolidation of the city with a number of economic growth nuclei influencing the future shape and direction of development activity Also evident is the growth of a significantly expanded commuter belt up to 80km around Dublin Understanding this pattern is a necessary first step in achieving maximum economic and social benefits from such development and minimising the negative impacts of the development boom Forms of Urban Development Urban development is expressed through a variety of distinct processes which act to constrain and influence the competitive ability of metropolitan areas Each metropolitan region is the product of a number of principal economic social physical and political factors that have influenced the respective character of each urban region to varying degrees All of the urban areas under investigation have been affected by urban development processes including Agglomeration of economic activity Commercial enterprises tend to cluster together in order to achieve economies of scale and derive the benefits associated from complementarity and the use of a developed infrastructure Major urban areas tend to offer a wide range of infrastructural supports to businesses including transport roads rail airports ports telecommunications educational institutions and ancillary services In addition the agglomeration process tends to be self reinforcing as incoming enterprises recognise the economic benefits offered to existing commerce and accordingly locate adjacent to these In essence businesses that cluster adopt a risk minimisation strategy Restructuring of economic activity As a direct consequence of the trend toward globalisation of commerce many traditional industries in Europe and the developed world particularly of a labour intensive nature have relocated to low wage developing economies The major metropolitan regions of Europe have been affected by these developments with basic assembly heavy industry food processing and clothing manufacturing experiencing plant closures New inward investment has tended in recent years to be high technology and internationally traded

    Original URL path: http://www.dublinpact.ie/conferencedetails/ConferenceReview/speakers/BWillliams/bwilliams2.html (2015-10-30)
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    p p This will include participation in the Conference refreshments lunch reception and documentation A number of concession places are available on application Tea coffee Booking There are a limited number of places so book early to avoid disappointment Contact Ms Sandra Moran Dublin Employment Pact at 01 8788900 or email smoran dublinpact ie Cheques to be made payable to Dublin Employment Pact at 7 North Great George s St Dublin 1 and be received no later than the 3rd November Enquiries Ms Sandra Moran Phone 353 1 878 8900 Fax 353 1 878 8711 E mail smoran dublinpact ie The Dublin Employment Pact The Dublin Employment Pact is a broad partnership of interests established to examine labour market and development issues in the Dublin Region Its Board comprises equal representation of the four key sectors concerned The Dublin Local Authorities the Local Development and Community Sector the Social Partners and relevant Government Departments and Statutory Agencies The Director of the Pact is Philip O Connor The DEP is supported through the National Development Plan and is registered in Dublin Reg No 340167 Dublin Employment Pact 7 North Great George s St Dublin 1 Phone 353 1 878 8900 Fax

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