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  • How to find out more! | DESSA
    print on tape on diskette and in braille The NDA s Building for Everyone 2002 offers best practice guidelines on promoting universal access to buildings and the environment with sections on how to design build and manage buildings and external environments for the inclusion access and use of everybody The National Council for the Blind in Ireland NCBI can supply factsheets such as Guidelines for Blind and Vision Impaired Pre school Children Toys for Vision Impaired Children and Babies and Toddlers Tips for the Early Years www ncbi ie There is a lot of practical advice available from the UK Community groups there consider many of the following to be essential reading Even though they are written for the British situation their general advice applies in Ireland If you can t get them yourself your local library should be able to source them for you Items marked with a are available from DESSA library to read on the premises only The Kids publication It Doesn t Just Happen inclusive management for inclusive play Douche 2002 deals with putting inclusive play into practice The book covers the ethos of inclusion and provides guidance on how to create and improve policies and practice by going step by step through the process of planning and managing inclusive play Each section starts with some principles of inclusive play management and goes on to outline key areas to address Call Kids on 00 44 207 359 3073 to get a copy More than Swings and Roundabouts Planning for Outdoor Play Children s Play Council National Children s Bureau 2002 Download it from www ncb org uk Developing Accessible Play Space a good practice guide Office of the Deputy Prime Minister 2003 London Play for All a video resource pack for staff and volunteers wanting to

    Original URL path: http://www.dessa.ie/play-all/how-find-out-more (2016-02-07)
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  • Introduction | DESSA
    People with Disabilities and DESSA the Steps to Mainstreaming Participation Framework was initiated The aim of the Steps Framework is to empower disabled people and community development practitioners with knowledge and capacity to ensure the active participation of disabled people within public civic and community life This is achieved through delivering strategic supports at local level to people with disabilities through community development organisations and providing those local community development organisations with the capacity and supports to co ordinate the programme at local level In support of this programmes were organised through local Community Development Programmes and Family Resource Centres with the purpose of mainstreaming services for people with disability In 2005 a pilot scheme of this framework was released At present the programme comprises of A series of training programmes designed to introduce disabled people to their local community Exploring disability issues so that participants can inform policy and effect change nationally and locally The development of practical skills to enable participation The development of advocacy and mentoring supports enabling disabled people achieve life goals within a mainstream community development context Capacity building among community development practitioners in disability equality The development of a model of mainstreaming The Steps to Mainstreaming sets out seven steps to participation for people with disabilities under three broad headings of social economic and community capacity The first three steps of the Programme Making Choices Step Forward and Mentoring West which are aimed at building social capacity come under the remit of this evaluation See Steps to Mainstreaming Participation Framework in Appendix 1 The Making Choices programme is directed towards people with disabilities at a local community level with the aim of increasing their participation in the community The training programme involves introduction to and becoming familiar with the local Community Development Programme CDP and Family Resource Centre FRC programme to encourage participation in the social cultural and economic activities of their community The Step Forward programme is directed towards those with an interest in disability issues with a view to influencing disability policy at a local and national level Finally the Mentoring West which was run as a pilot project aims to build on the initial steps with a view to providing CDPs and FRCs the resource of trained disabled mentors to work with assigned individuals who have self advocacy capabilities Conceptual framework of the Steps to Mainstreaming Participation Framework The review has examined a large number of printed internal documents texts notes and awareness materials used in the initiative by one of the main tutor facilitators The documents had a wide scope They embraced presentations on the concepts of Mentoring Advocacy Community Development Following this document examination the review produced a 20 page paper on social inclusion and active citizenship advocacy in its various forms and community development The paper is provided separate to the evaluation and distinguishes between the emphasis that these concepts bring to social development and social inclusion perspectives and practices This is a potentially stand alone paper and

    Original URL path: http://www.dessa.ie/evaluation-report-dessa%E2%80%99s-steps-mainstreaming-participation-framework/introduction (2016-02-07)
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  • Methodology | DESSA
    and make recommendations based on best practice Examine and make recommendations in relation to the overall content of the Steps to Mainstreaming Participation Framework including its purpose as a community development mainstream strategy Identify the resources technical support and the expertise required to maintain the ongoing development of the Framework Examine and make recommendations regarding the optimum partnership element of this work Compare or contrast the projects using a community development framework Type of evaluation method employed in this research The methods employed in this evaluation were Roundtable discussions with project participants facilitators and staff in two regions Phone interviews with individual members of project teams Discussions with project promoters funders and facilitators Site visit to one project Document examination Particular emphasis was placed on the evidence opinions or data which would signal a need to adjust or alter the Programme in the light of practice Evaluation Design strengths and weaknesses The evaluation used a look back technique to ascertain how the participants and staff of the projects recalled and remembered their experiences and attitudes at the time The research team were aware that using such a technique might lead to a number of weaknesses such as individuals not being able to remember specific details individuals having selective recall and individuals adjusting their views with the benefit of hindsight The design of the evaluation presumed wrongly as it turned out that local area based projects would have maintained detailed records of participants their backgrounds and outcomes of participation in the programme This absence proved a disadvantage in making a comprehensive assessment The time which had elapsed since the end of some project s activities and the commencement of the evaluation meant that not all key individuals were available for interview Roundtable discussions To facilitate the evaluation two roundtable discussions were organised one in Galway city and one in Limerick city Staff and up to three participants in CDPs and FRCs residing in these or near to these areas were invited to attend these meetings Additionally one programme in Raphoe Co Donegal was taken as a case study where staff and participants were met and interviewed in their Family Resource Centre which hosts the Steps to Mainstreaming Participation Framework Three general open questions were used in the round table discussions with staff and participants These were Looking back what were your expectations of the programme Looking back what was your experience of the programme How did it turn out Two information notes were issued one from DESSA and one describing the role of Ralaheen in the research to invite staff and participants Appendix 2 Telephone interviews were made to projects A feedback form was given to those in attendance at the meeting requesting data on the numbers who expressed interest in attending the programme initially numbers who attended the programme and numbers who decided to opt out of the programme before completion Tables 2 and 3 outline the projects invited to attend the roundtables Table 2 Limerick Roundtable discussion 10th October

    Original URL path: http://www.dessa.ie/evaluation-report-dessa%E2%80%99s-steps-mainstreaming-participation-framework/methodology (2016-02-07)
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  • Roll out and Administration of Programme | DESSA
    area such as the Irish Wheelchair Association In some project areas as many as two or three Day Services are in existence some catering for specific disabilities A staff member of Our Lady of Lourdes CDP felt that radio worked best as a means of communication in the area an ad was placed on the community diary slot An advertisement was placed in the Disability Federation of Ireland newsletter emails were sent an ad was placed in the Limerick paper and posters were also used to recruit numbers Door to door was not used as resources such as personnel would be a problem It was felt that the way in which participants were recruited to the Programme had a huge bearing on how the programme was rolled out In many projects the type of disability affected the content preference of the programme In one instance the group consisted of only people without a disability and two persons who had initially joined with a disability felt outnumbered and withdrew from the Programme In other projects if the programmes were advertised to Day Services these participants would have different preferences to those not attending a Day Service Southill FRC commented on the fear of enrolling noting the Community apprehension of taking part in programme due to fear of losing entitlement to disability benefits and do not want to go over 19 hours a week in activities Access to persons with a disability in the area remains problematic for some projects in the Limerick area An example was given of advertisement placed in the paper but a large number of people did not feel that it applied to them Needs are not being met due to isolation Some may even feel disillusioned from applying for services due to past experiences An example of differing experiences given for participation in the Programme was that some participants received payment top ups while others did not DESSA meeting Limerick Communication is a big thing to people that need the service the household should know about it it should describe what is going to be put on offer It has to be the household because the household is involved let them avail of the information all through B s life I have to physically go and check what projects are going on Parent at Galway roundtable Several of the comments made in the evaluation raised issues which can be addressed Open days for the Programme can explain what is on offer including benefit and allowance entitlements Some projects in fact paid a top up to those participating but who do not claim a DSFA benefit or allowance Indeed any person not claiming a benefit or allowance should be accompanied to a CIC by the project to have their circumstances reviewed Duration of programmes The Making Choices Programme was to be run for ten weeks and the Step Forward Group Development was to be run for six weeks However it was found that the programmes were run with

    Original URL path: http://www.dessa.ie/evaluation-report-dessa%E2%80%99s-steps-mainstreaming-participation-framework/roll-out-and-administration (2016-02-07)
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  • Findings from the Research | DESSA
    level of resources available the delivery techniques of facilitators Although the Programme has been described as flexible to adapt to each group of participants and the project setting the core objectives of the Steps Framework were sometimes disconnected from the delivery and outcomes of projects It was felt that to maintain the programme as an effective mainstreaming tool some consistency is needed in its roll out in projects For some staff a main priority was involvement of participants and their needs or additional skills required Staff in Hospital FRC felt that it was important for people with disabilities to have an opportunity to coordinate the sessions In a number of projects participants were not involved in the planning stages of the programmes As a result their preferences were not included or explored The inclusion of the medical model versus social model of disability in the programme delivery was viewed as extremely beneficial by both staff and participants Staff were not familiar with these concepts One staff member commented on the delivery and facilitation of the programme by a person with a disability The staff member described this as a genuine example of achievement by a person with a disability This facilitator was commended for presenting leadership and motivational skills Some staff members described the length of each session as too long especially for those who were venturing outside of their own homes into local community programmes for the first time At the beginning 20 participants attended the workshop This fell to eight participants by the end of the programme Mostly men dropped out and it was felt the most common reason for drop out was the radical shift experienced by participants many of who did not leave their house before to sitting around in a circle in the middle of the floor Activities such as drama were also a huge influence on the numbers who dropped out No input from the participants was asked for in the planning of the workshop Other reasons for drop out included personal issues others felt they had moved on and outgrown the group Some participants felt that the drama was often not suitable and excluded certain individuals Telephone conversation Hospital Family Resource Centre Aonad Resource Centre felt that participants of the programme preferred sessions focussed on day to day experiences rather than those delivered on the importance of the social model or drama sessions The majority of participants in the group of nine participants have mental health difficulties and felt that sessions on therapy stress management and relaxation were more enjoyable than those on academic issues For these facilitators were hired from Mayo Galway and Sligo Modules that have been included in various programmes include art woodwork lobbying skills computer training literacy gardening aromatherapy and drama A high level of administration to run the programme is required according to some staff members they found having a point of contact to refer to with questions regarding the funding application forms and programme useful In a Limerick region a collaboration of two CDPs and one FRC had proved successful in reaching out to people with disabilities in their respective areas while job sharing the administration tasks of the programme A programme coordinator found the charges of one facilitator quite expensive She found the administrative work considerable such as recruitment getting a suitable room and funding tutors and module material it involved a lot of work Programme aims versus programme outcomes One staff member described the programme as particularly good value for money as it opened a floodgate of needs of people with disabilities in the local area Programme participants and project staff where the group had moved onto to forming two or more groups viewed operating on a step by step framework as essential Staff felt that the topic of concern on which the framework is based is a slow process and staff were unable to estimate how long such groups should be funded for Examples of outcomes from the programmes which addressed social inclusion and participation were used to illustrate this point such as forming their own committees or chairing meetings confidence building support to living at home independently for those with an acquired disability awareness training successful local community lobbying campaigns and update of skills In Southill a programme participant is now the Chair of a Disability Awareness group in the area Two programme groups organised a successful lobbying campaign on the use of footpaths Na Calai CDP and Hospital FRC Two participants of the East Clare CDP moved on to further education while a further two got jobs In the majority of projects a follow up or second follow up programme was underway or applications were awaiting approval The costs applied for and received for these varied considerably from the original programme for different reasons Projects were currently in the process of the Steps Framework having originally run the Making Choices Programme and from this the Step Forward Programme Projects had gone one step further in delivering an Advocacy Programme a third related programme for participants In Abbeyfeale the West Limerick CDP hosts a second group called the Look Forward group which is made up of 11 participants from the original group of 13 One of the aims of the programme outlined in material supplied to the research team indicated that the programme would facilitate members to explore their identity and transform issues to a national level From meeting with the participants and staff involved with the programme it would seem that this would be an unrealistic short term goal based on what the programme has achieved to date and the preferences of participants It would be more advisable that this could be done through DESSA under its current remit and objectives Following meetings with each of the participating projects DESSA could be informed of the issues affecting people with disabilities in local communities Policy reform is a complex national process and should not be a goal for the programme participants In terms

    Original URL path: http://www.dessa.ie/evaluation-report-dessa%E2%80%99s-steps-mainstreaming-participation-framework/findings-research (2016-02-07)
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  • Raphoe Case Study - Donegal | DESSA
    of 9 3 A breakdown of the numbers of persons with a disability in Raphoe by age group is illustrated in Table 11 Table 11 Number of people with a disability living in Raphoe categorised by age group and as a percentage of the total number of people living in Raphoe 2006 Age 0 14 15 24 25 44 45 65 65 Total Nos 15 9 32 41 35 132 of total population living in Raphoe of total population living in Raphoe of total population living in Raphoe of total population living in Raphoe of total population living in Raphoe 1 4 0 8 3 0 3 9 3 3 12 4 Source Central Statistics Office 2006 Small Area Population Statistics Description of the programme In Raphoe the centre co ordinator described the programme as value for money He believes each Steps participant is contributing to an enriched experience in the Family Resource Centre He notes that as theProgramme is run outside of the house or residential centre the participants are living in it is more beneficial to them The FRC Coordinator considers individual outcomes for each participant as essential in planning the programme Some participants live in households where siblings or parents also have a disability Autism Spectrum Parkinson s Disease learning disability Funding The Family Resource Centre provides individual travel to the programme for each participant This is usually through a personal taxi service Raphoe FRC estimates the cost at over 2 000 a year Many voluntary organisations and not for profit organisations have fleets of vans which are idle some of the day and are not shared with other organisations despite public investment in those same organisations The use of cabs however means that people are not being bussed into centres involving long journeys Costs for PA s are built into funding applications This ensures participation of people with disabilities at meetings In a third application for funding Raphoe has incorporated reasonable accommodations to ensure that if a persons condition deteriorates over time they will be catered for Responses from participants Equality of participation in the group appeared strong along with the importance placed on decisionmaking for individuals in the group A participant described the setting for the Programme as a nice place One participant commented on the feeling of belonging in the group and described each member of the group as equal adding in the time spent in the group others don t talk over you and include you Skills and learning Activities in Raphoe include role play golf karaoke music first aid indoor barbeque and Christmas shopping One woman with a physical disability reported on the difficulty in accessing education in the past She stated that she can catch up on skills and education in the group Voter participation was incorporated into the group through allowing each participant to vote on their Christmas shopping location However when the group were asked to discuss work and training the group described the programme as more relaxed atmosphere

    Original URL path: http://www.dessa.ie/evaluation-report-dessa%E2%80%99s-steps-mainstreaming-participation-framework/raphoe-case-study-donegal (2016-02-07)
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  • Conclusions and Proposals | DESSA
    given to programme co ordinators in how costs should be managed and allocated both in applications and implementation of the programme Participant recruitment The DSFA had facilitated some projects by inserting information about the programme into selected mail shots so that potential participants would be informed While some project staff thought this was a great idea none could say whether this was actually effective It might be argued that the role of community based projects is to develop their own communication routes especially as not all potential participants will be claimants The recruitment of participants for each programme should give consideration to the background of participants and their type of disability Recruitment should take account of the policy of the Health Service Executive to encourage large scale residential service providers for people with disabilities to develop community based settlement of residents in towns and villages across the country Description The Step Forward Programme might be described as a programme of social participation learning or information Rolling out the programme Promoters of initiatives should have some basic data on disability which is available from public sources or other non profit bodies while preparing their applications In material supplied to the review team reference was made to drawing up a simple toolkit of practical steps in rolling out the Programme Such a resource is not in existence The review team would be favourable to such a resource being available to project staff Individuals with a wide range of disabilities attended the programme However some of the impairments that individuals have may have an impact on the topic preferences of the individuals Size of participant group Staff felt that the size of the group was important The greater the size of the group the harder it is for participants to connect with each other One staff member recommended a number between 12 18 as the ideal group size This would allow participants to have an input into the programme content Curriculum design Greater consideration needs to be given to the curriculum the Steps to Mainstreaming Participation Framework The evaluation team were made aware that in some instances the group did not easily relate to the activities and topics addressed in the Programme For many participants their personal background had a significant impact on their preferences for programme content Participants described the programme as a social outing Both staff and participants expressed an overwhelming preference for social rather than learning aspects of the course Should the programme be redesigned this factor should be taken into consideration The evaluation team recommends that in rolling out such programmes in the future original material be drafted or referenced to its source or idea Facilitators Although many staff members appreciated the use of external non local facilitators due to the extra costs of travel and accommodation expenses incurred through their hiring the review team felt that additional costs such as these should be kept to a minimum through hiring local or regional specialised facilitators where qualified and available

    Original URL path: http://www.dessa.ie/evaluation-report-dessa%E2%80%99s-steps-mainstreaming-participation-framework/conclusions-and-proposals (2016-02-07)
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  • Steps to Mainstreaming Participation | DESSA
    activation and social participation as preparatory to social inclusion actions for and with people with disabilities DSFA DESSA Communication of concept Programme should be placed in context and communicated with reference to UN Convention on Rights of People with Disabilities and DSFA Sectoral Plan implementation DSFA DESSA Programme design Collaboration Promoters might explore the provision of a hot meal in the middle of the day as is the practice in at least one project currently running Projects should identify where appropriate partners organisations and associations who would wish to be associated with the activities of the Programmes Co operation and collaboration with local structures such as County Development Boards might be advisable to embed project actions in the local structures Projects Engagement of participants Participants should be engaged taking account of their prior learning if any and proximity or remoteness to services and civil society Organisations and associations of people with disabilities family members should be encouraged to participate at this stage of project development Projects Mobilisation of participants peer support Where potential participants are for example Deaf they might be encouraged to invite others who can offer peer support Projects Preparation A half day or full day workshop with project promoters funders and support bodies appears to iron out preliminary hitches Supporting projects using a simple set of suggestions and guidelines drawn from the experience of existing projects printed or by web would facilitate the roll out of the initiative DESSA Development of course content Planning for simple outcomes for and with individuals participating is helpful for individuals participating and for funders Projects should be flexible in adapting the course content to the interests and opinions of participants and particular barriers they may face in society particularly in relation to step one and two of the Framework It is

    Original URL path: http://www.dessa.ie/evaluation-report-dessa%E2%80%99s-steps-mainstreaming-participation-framework/steps-mainstreaming (2016-02-07)
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