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  • Constituent Organisations - CIGO
    North of Ireland Family History Society Raheny Heritage Society Western Family History Association Wicklow County Genealogical Society OVERSEAS Australia Australian Institute of Genealogical Studies Australasian Federation of Family History Organisations Genealogical Society of the Northern Territory Genealogical Society of Victoria Queensland Family History Society Society of Australian Genealogists South Australian Genealogy and Heraldry Society Tasmanian Family History Society Canada Alberta Family Histories Society British Isles Family History Society of Greater

    Original URL path: http://www.cigo.ie/constituents.html (2016-02-09)
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  • CIGO Award for Excellence in Genealogy
    entries in it available to millions worldwide through the Internet He said for Dublin families the lack of nineteenth century census records is more than made up for with the data now made available through the Trust s website The burial registers note people born as early as the middle of the eighteenth century John Green Chairman of Glasnevin Trust said The maintenance of accurate burial and cremation records has been an intrinsic part of the Trust s primary role of caring for the dead irrespective of their creed or position in society for over 178 years now We are justifiably proud of that achievement and are delighted that these records over 1 5 million of them are now available to everyone with an interest in Ireland s and their own families modern history Given CIGO s preeminent position within the Irish genealogical community we are particularly grateful to receive this award which serves to honour the memory of those buried and cremated by the Trust as well as everyone who contributed to the creation maintenance and now digitisation of the records over many years Click here for photographs of the presentation and AGM The 2010 Award for Excellence in Genealogy CIGO announces that Clare County Library is to be the fourth 2010 recipient of its Award for Excellence in Genealogy At the 2010 AGM CIGO announced that Clare County Library would be the recipient of its 2010 Award for Excellence in Genealogy not only in recognition of the facilities provided in the Local Studies Centre at Ennis which includes a magnificent collection of Clare newspapers and the recently acquired microfilmed parish registers but particularly the online genealogy section of the Library s website The website includes invaluable transcriptions of Tithe Applotment Books gravestone inscriptions with photographs school rolls and indexes to newspaper extracts etc The value of these resources is further enhanced by the cross linked townland and parish indexes and maps which help researchers to identify Clare place names CIGO finds that the website sets an extremely high standard for data provision to which other libraries should be encouraged to aspire In recognising Clare County Library s achievements in genealogy CIGO also acknowledges the contribution of all those who have donated time and material to make the website the success that it so clearly is The formal presentation of the certificate commemorating the Award took place in Ennis Co Clare on Thursday 10th February 2011 It was subsequently reported in Irish Library News and on the Clare County Library Blog Patrons of the Library s facilities gave their congratulations too Click here to read the comments made by Steven C ffeary Smyrl Executive Liason Officer of CIGO at the presentation Click here for photographs of the presentation The 2009 Award for Excellence in Genealogy CIGO announces that the National Archives of Ireland is the third recipient of its Award for Excellence in Genealogy At the 2009 AGM CIGO announced that the National Archives of Ireland would be the

    Original URL path: http://www.cigo.ie/CIGOAWARD.html (2016-02-09)
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  • CIGO Online Bookstore
    Exploring Irish Genealogy series in 2000 a series of guides to the various sources available to those searching for Irish ancestors In addition to Civil Registration Vital records it is intended to deal with the four main Irish religious denominations Roman Catholics the Church of Ireland Presbyterians and Methodists So far two titles have been published the first dealing with civil registration and the second with Irish Methodism It is hoped that the third in the series looking at the records of the Irish Roman Catholics will be published shortly NO 1 IRISH METHODISTS WHERE DO I START 5 plus Postage and Packaging 95c Ireland 1 45 Rest of World NO 2 IRISH CIVIL REGISTRATION WHERE DO I START 5 plus Postage and Packaging 1 30 Ireland 2 85 Rest of World Aspects of Irish Genealogy Each of these three volumes contains a selection of the papers given at each of the first three Irish Genealogical Congresses The first was held in 1991 the second 1994 and the third 1997 Although the fourth was held in 2001 Aspects 4 has not yet appeared For those in search of sources to trace that elusive Irish ancestor we can highly recommend any

    Original URL path: http://www.cigo.ie/bookstore.html (2016-02-09)
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  • News
    Dáil yesterday The full debate can be read online References to genealogy were made by Deputy Catherine Murphy the John Grennan whom she cites is presumably CIGO s patron John Grenham and by Minister of State Brian Hayes in wrapping up the debate Minister Hayes stated that the points raised about genealogy will be debated in greater detail at the next Stage The Minister with overall responsibility for the passage of the FOI Bill is Brendan Howlin TD and during the coming committee stage he will put on record that concerns about access to civil records of birth death and marriage are unfounded Contrary to the concerns about restriction of access after many years of lobbying by CIGO recent legislative changes will actually allow greater access to civil registration records online The Civil Registration Act 2004 has been amended to allow the Minister for Arts Heritage the Gaeltacht currently Jimmy Deenihan TD to make the indexes to Ireland s birth death marriage records which date back to 1845 available on its website www irishgenealogy ie These indexes are more complete than those currently available online 1845 1958 at FamilySearch org Ancestry com or Findmypast ie On another note genealogists should keep a keen eye out for the coming Civil Registration Amendment Bill 2013 recently announced by the Irish government Amongst other things the Bill will provide for the compulsory registration of fathers names in birth registrations and stopping sham marriages For genealogists it is hoped that at long last provision will be made for next of kin to be involved in the registration of deaths by coroners Currently deaths where the coroner becomes involved must be registered by the coroner but this generally means that vital biographical information about the deceased such as date and place of birth and parents names is omitted CIGO has long called for coroners to be allowed as doctors are to issue a cause of death certificate to the next of kin thus allowing them to attend the registrar s office to make the registration and provide family data 17th July 2013 General Register Office s Dublin Research Room to Move To Rundown Former Dole Office The General Register Office s Research Facility is set to move from its convenient and well appointed premises at the Irish Life Centre Talbot Street to a dilapidated former Dole Office on Werburgh Street The lease on the GRO s current facility where the public can trace their ancestors through access to birth death and marriage records will expire at the end of August Located on Talbot Street the current facility is close to Connolly Station LUAS DART and many bus stops For genealogists it s also next to the Valuation Office where information about ancestors land holdings can be traced back to the 1850s By comparison the proposed new home for the facility is on a side street in a run down and dilapidated former dole office protected by high security fencing topped with barbed wire Given that

    Original URL path: http://www.cigo.ie/news.html (2016-02-09)
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  • Current Campaigns - General Register Office
    However what an awful shock I got when I visited the GRO There were too many people in such a small space The research room was grubby and the furniture and other fittings well beyond the point at which they should have been thrown out Many of the indexes which are vital in gaining access to the actual records were in tatters I tried to locate a birth in the 1880s but found that in the relevant section of the index the pages jumped missing out the section of the alphabet I needed A member of staff very kindly brought me out a duplicate copy of the same volume but it was just the same When I did at last manage to find a reference to a record I required I found that even though I had paid a 12 search fee I would not be allowed to obtain more that eight photocopies I had intended to search for the birth of my great grandfather James O Neill who was born about 1870 However when I saw just how many possible references there were to be checked in just the years 1869 to 1871 I did not bother The limit of the eight photocopies and their cost set at 1 50 each made the whole idea a non starter I was very disappointed with the service I received in the GRO though the staff themselves were extremely helpful just over worked A second copy of the GRO microfilms should definitely be made available as soon as possible at the National Library On foot of the report and the stir the petition caused improvements were made to the searchroom and the service though they proved to be of limited impact Again promise of improvement to the service was made at the time of the Social Welfare Miscellaneous Provisions Bill 2002 which had tacked onto the end of it various clauses to enable some interim changes to be made to the Victorian legislation This was because any real progress had still yet to be made in drawing up a completely new modern legislative framework At this time CIGO raised the issue of the lack of identifying information recorded in Irish death registrations through a press release which led to press coverage through a letters campaign to the print media through contribution to debates in both the Dáil and the Seanad and although no change was achieved at that time the groundwork had been laid for later success with the Bill stages of the Civil Registration Act 2004 CIGO s very successful lobbying of public representatives and media briefing ensured a high profile for the issue particularly in The Irish Times the result of which was that for the first time ever all future death registrations would be required to include deceased persons dates places of birth and both parents full names CIGO is concerned that this requirement is still not being met in all cases where deaths are registered by Coroners rather

    Original URL path: http://www.cigo.ie/campaigns_gro.html (2016-02-09)
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  • Current Campaigns -Access to Records
    Holders Constituent Organisations CIGO Award Bookstore News Current Campaigns General Register Office Access to Records Church Records 1926 Census Links Events Diary Genealogy Courses Current Campaigns Access to Records This page is still under construction Back to Top Council of

    Original URL path: http://www.cigo.ie/campaigns_access.html (2016-02-09)
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  • Current Campaigns -Church Records
    Roman Catholic parishes on the island of Ireland and although some were missed or badly filmed and few post 1880 records have ever been microfilmed this project coupled with the later indexing of the Tithe Books and Griffith s Primary Valuation revolutionised genealogical research in Ireland During the 1980s in almost every county there sprang up a centre which became known as Heritage Centres to index the older records usually pre 1900 of the local churches in an effort to create training for unemployed young people and to encourage the overseas Irish to visit the local area their ancestors hailed from From the onset the scheme was beset with bickering and infighting caused by the lack of any real centralised authority or oversight In more recent times there has been the problem of centres closing due to the lack of funding of once vibrant county centres such as that in Co Kerry However setting all that aside in very many counties right across the island access to church records can now be made through computerised indexes in addition to making searches in the original records However in Ireland policy relating to the preservation of original records lags way behind other countries with similar cultures and backgrounds Even Northern Ireland is little better It has generally been accepted that the National Archives formerly the Public Record Office responsibility for Church of Ireland records is now exercised on its behalf by the Representative Church Body RCB Library the library of the Church of Ireland based in Dublin But the RCB does not appear to have the clout to compulsorily call in records from local parishes where many are kept in far from ideal conditions The idea of archives in the Roman Catholic tradition is so new in Ireland that those that have been established have got little further than the collecting of records relating to administration at diocesan level While both the Presbyterians and the Methodists have archives based in Belfast neither has very many holdings from local congregations Although the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland PRONI has an enviable collection of microfilmed copies of church records from across all the main Christian denominations its policy remains to leave original material in local custody even pre 1870 public record Church of Ireland registers While one must keep in mind the terrible fate that befell the Church of Ireland records which were destroyed in the great conflagration of 1922 it needs to be remembered that such an event is unlikely to occur again and in reality far more damage is occurring on a daily basis because valuable original records are being retained in local custody and in conditions that fall far short of accepted international archival standards During the so called Celtic Tiger era the Irish government quickly lost interest in the vast database of information gathered together by the various county based Heritage Centres Having invested huge sums of taxpayers money in this scheme the government did little or nothing for

    Original URL path: http://www.cigo.ie/campaigns_church.html (2016-02-09)
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  • Current Campaigns - 1926 Census
    be destroyed The problem with this advice was that it was given without having first established that while in Great Britain the data in these schedules had been copied into census enumerators books for future preservation no such system existed in Ireland There was to have been a census undertaken in Ireland in April 1921 but at a session of Dáil Éireann in the second week of March of that year a decree was passed authorising the Minister of Home Affairs to forbid the census proposed to be taken by the British Government as an invasion by an alien authority of the rights of the Irish people The Irish Times 22 March 1921 However this decree was not mentioned in a related announcement made on 1 April 1921 by Dublin Castle Owing to the existence of a state of rebellion in the South and West of Ireland and the disturbed conditions in certain other parts of the country the Government have come to the conclusion that if a Census were held in the coming month it would be impossible to obtain complete and accurate returns No useful purpose would be achieved by holding a Census at heavy expense if the returns so obtained were either incomplete or misleading as no statistics based upon these returns would be of any value The Government have therefore decided to postpone the holding of a Census in Ireland on the present occasion Under the Government of Ireland Act 1920 all responsibility in regard to the Census question passes to the Governments of Southern and Northern Ireland It will be for these Governments when they are constituted to consider upon what conditions and at what time the Census shall be held in Southern and Northern Ireland respectively In the following year the Irish Free State was established under the so called Anglo Irish Treaty which had been signed on 6 December 1921 and ratified by Dáil Éireann on 7 January 1922 The first census to be undertaken by the Irish Free State was legislated for in the Statistics Act 1926 and the enumeration was conducted in the same year The construction of the wording of section 13 1 of the Act precluded the authorities from releasing the household returns for public inspection This was remedied with the passing of the Statistics Act 1993 when it was established that once one hundred years had elapsed census returns could be opened to researchers At the time the Act then a Bill was progressing through its parliamentary stages CIGO and the Dun Laoghaire Genealogical Society now the Genealogical Society of Ireland led a successful campaign to amend the Bill to release census material after the elapse of only seventy five years Unfortunately at a later stage in the process this amendment was reconsidered and at this time all post 1922 Irish census records remain subject to the one hundred year rule CIGO is not alone in regretting that the State s access policy to census records does not

    Original URL path: http://www.cigo.ie/campaigns_1926.html (2016-02-09)
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