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  • Cloone & Aughavas Parishes Website - Cloone Parish History
    Honourable William Beresford The parish originally extended as far as Lurga in Mohill Described in newspapers as a plain edifice in the old English style it was noted for its celebration services The Rev Dr Digges formerly known as the Beeman conducted services there Rev Louis Cloak whose wife is buried in the graveyard was rector here from 1888 to 1910 Successive rectors from his time were Rev Andrew Graham Rev Henry Crampton Rev Richard Fergusson Rev Richard Gregg The last rector was Canon Ferguson On entering the church there was a stairway in the hallway that led up to the Bell Tower with a doorway on route that led out into the gallery The gallery was the full width of the back of the Church There was the usual church furniture a pulpit single and double pews facing a font and a reading desk We know of two plaques that hung on the walls one was to the memory of Thomas Lloyd J P D L Annaghloyd and another to the Rev Cloak s wife There was a grate fireplace close to the pulpit The choir stood nearby Oil lamps provided the lighting Worshippers in the past would have included most of the local landed gentry the Whytes of the Grange the Wests of Cloone and Drumdarkin the Dundas the Lloyds and the Hustons A little enclosure at the side of the church was used in the past to stable the rector s horse while the larger building on the lane leading down to the village was the caretakers residence The graveyard surrounding the church is one of the oldest in the county where there is a mixture of Catholic and Protestant graves the top half around the tower being Church of Ireland There is a low stone building in the main body of the graveyard known as the Coffin house It would appear to be an old vault but there is no record of who it belonged to St James Church closed its doors for the last time in 1932 The Church bell was sold to the Parish Church in Cleenish Co Fermanagh Coincidentally the first baby to be baptised in the new church was Henry Huston and the last Lily Mee a sister of Mrs Annie Huston of Drumbore The rectors lived at Drumharkin Glebe It was partially burned down maliciously in 1836 The new Glebe House was built in 1843 There were large picnics held annually on the lawn for members of the Church in Cloone and surrounding parishes In later years Fr Peter Conefrey P P of Cloone bought it as the curate s house in 1938 for 700 19th Century Cloone In a report on hedge schools dated 1826 five are recorded in and around the village of Cloone A Roman Catholic schoolmaster Owen Mc Mahon held classes in his own house it was known as the Latin school An English school is described as being built of clay and straw and the master in residence was Patrick Mitchell A third school had no designated base and the teacher here was Bernard Hammal all were designated as pay schools Hedge schools outside the village were situated at Sonnaghmore Drumgowla and Rocullion Elizabeth Elliot was mistress of a Protestant school located at her cottage at Streamstown A later description of the parish states that there were three Roman Catholic churches in the parish of Cloone one each at Aughavas Gortletteragh and Cloone The old church in Cloone was built some years previous to St James on the present day site of the old R C cemetery Old stiles and Mass passes through which worshippers travelled can still be identified today This report also outlines that there were six public schools one of which was supported by the Rector and two by S White where 300 boys and 200 girls were instructed Then there were 25 pay schools in which 1440 children attend and two Sunday schools From Lewis Topographical Dictionary of 1837 we learn that the land is chiefly under tillage limestone is quarried lead ore had been found near Aughavas but not worked to any extent Eight fairs are held at intervals throughout the year Petty sessions were held every alternate Wednesday at the courthouse which was situated at the back of the RIC barracks It stood on the site where St Mary s Church is now located In a letter to the Leitrim Advertiser of October 1881 an unnamed correspondent describes Cloone as follows it contains a police barracks a Roman Catholic chapel and a Protestant church a school a few public houses and one or two drugstores It contains the usual compliment of very humble dwellings the houses of small tenants and labourers The Famine In the year 1832 the population of Cloone is given as 19 000 In that same year there is a record of a request by the local gentry to the Central Board of Health for Ireland to secure and advance on a grant to provide for a medical attendant and a hospital to control a severe outbreak of cholera Worse was to follow in 1846 when the Great Famine struck and repeated itself for the next four years The population of townlands within the parish of Cloone fell by 1 3 due to death from fever starvation and emigration Between 1846 and 1851 destitute starving people roamed the countryside surviving on grass and herbs even the nettles on family graves were preserved for that family s use only There are a significant number of lone bushes throughout the parish the only burial monuments remaining to the lost generations of the Great Famine Two holly bushes at Drumgowna reputedly mark the spot where two men died on their way to a mill at Keeldra In the county of Leitrim it is recorded that many died of fever and were buried in ditches which were covered in unknown to anyone Among the upper classes the percentage of those who caught fever and died was high in the counties of Cavan Leitrim Roscommon and Sligo The reason probably was that the constant occurrence of fever cases had brought the poor Irish some degree of immunity No legal register of deaths exists for that time Major Halliday Inspecting Officer for Leitrim thought the population of the county had been reduced by a quarter Markings and mounds at what was assumed to be a graveyard at Caldra within the townland of Annaghmaconway are remembered by some of the parishes older generation Some would say it was a famine graveyard while others maintain it was a burial ground for unbaptised children Two benefactors on behalf of the people were the local parish Priest Rev James McTiernan and the Rev Andrew Hogg the local vicar The latter wrote ceaselessly to the Dublin based Famine Relief Commission seeking funds plus consignments of meal and biscuits to avert a total disaster Cloone Soup Shop was set up at Drumharkin Glebe It was run on funds donated by those who could afford to give a little to help in someway to feed those who had nothing The local landlords West and White also subscribed to its upkeep There was a stirabout boiler at White s house at the Grange Relief schemes such as road making were more then likely a feature in the area The wall encircling what was once the orchard at the Grange was built under the terms of this scheme The Land Wars Post Famine years brought subtle changes in fanning methods The price of farm produce such as oats and barley fell and landlords turned to cattle production Rents were high and coupled with the desire by landlords to enlarge their estates evictions were widespread This in turn led to agitation by tenant farmers and an increase in secret societies such as the Peep O Day Boys the Molly Maguires and Captain Moonlight Members were all bound by an oath and formed from local people to deal with injustices meted out by the landlords and their agents especially a group known as emergency men They were particularly unpopular because in most cases they were landlords allies who took possession of evictees homes and farms Outrages was the general term used to describe the attacks of members of these secret societies on people their possessions and livestock Such an outrage was described in the Roscommon Leitrim Gazette of June 1852 where an attempt was made to murder an inoffensive man by five Molly Maguires dressed in women s attire while in the discharge of his duties at Cloone House The article outlines that the victim was severely beaten It continues that this outrage was only one of many that has disgraced the parish of Cloone Illegal meetings under the denomination of a dance are held once a week where resolutions are entered into and instructions given for the carrying out of such Again from the same paper we read that in consequence of private information received of an intended row of a desperate nature a large body of police were in evidence at Cloone s May fair The Resident magistrate and local Justices of the Peace Messrs West Lawder and O Brien also attended at the fair and only for such a strong demonstration of force more serious outrages would have occurred Overall Cloone differed little from the rest of rural Ireland with small tenant families struggling under the burden of high rents bad harvests and barely able to survive while the landlords lived in considerable comfort with the result that there was majority support within the parish for the Irish National Land League which was founded in 1879 In the Leitrim Advertiser again of June 1881 we note that Mohill Union was requested to provide accommodation for families about to be evicted where White was the plaintiff Again in the same paper there is an account of a man named Carney a bailiff to White who was shot at by two men he escaped injury In October 23rd of 1890 we discover that famine once again threatens Extensive distress is imminent in the townlands of Corduff Drumdarkin and Adoon among other townlands in the Mohill and Ballinamore areas It further states that although families were not dependent upon the potato crop they would be subject to great privation by the Spring It was imperative to look for employment in anyway which would help them earn a living It was proposed at a meeting held at Ballinamore Courthouse by the parish priest Dominic McBrien and the rector the Rev Clark that a submission be forwarded to the Lord Lieutenant the Chief Secretary for the Treasury and The Right Hon the Earl of Kingston Chairman of the Cavan Leitrim and Roscommon Railway Company requesting that some form of relief works was necessary The recommendation outlined that the best form of relief would be the institution of works for an extension to the Cavan Leitrim and Roscommon Light Railway to Strokestown and Roscommon Such works would not only encourage the habits of the industry but would provide labour of a reproductive nature and not only benefit the districts it passed through but also areas where such work would be relieving destitution and preventing loss of life But the proposal never came to fruition With the passing of the Wyndham Act in 1903 a substantial sum of money was made available to allow tenants buy out their holdings and by the end of the decade the transfer from the landlordism was almost complete Cavan Leitrim Railway The Cavan Leitrim Railway or the Narrow Guage as it was familiarly known was opened in 1888 Steam driven trains operated the line which ran between Dromod and Belturbet Technically the station at Adoon was classified as a shelter with a platform on the up side The haltkeepers house was built on the Dromod side of the gates but it was not possible to have a platform there on account of the gradient Initially haltkeepers earned one shilling per week They also got 5 commission on receipts and a free house where the ticket office was located The service was invaluable at a time when the bicycle or more likely the horse drawn cart were the only means of distance transport to the ordinary individual Farmers walked their cattle to fairs in Mohill but the train was the only way that dealers could transport livestock out of the area Groceries and agricultural needs were collected at Mohill or Dromod station and carted from there to shops further a field Towards the end of the 1800 s through to the 1920 s Mohill station would have seen the tearful farewells of many emigrants from the Cloone In most cases it was a matter of a last farewell to parents and friends because the return of an emigrant was a rare event in those days The Narrow Gauge closed in 1959 but many nostalgic memories of journeys taken events happy and unhappy remain with the older generation of the parish Twentieth Century If time travel were to become a reality and not the stuff of science fiction one wonders what a typical Cloone native from the start of the 1900 s would make of things in this the 2nd year of the 3rd millennium The transformation of the county as a whole with a total transition from a way of life that existed for centuries before would make Cloone a very alien place to this time traveller in political social and economic terms The initial decades of the last century indicated the direction and scale of things to come In 1914 John Redmond urged the Irish Volunteers to enlist in the British Army the majority mainly from urban areas and known as the National Volunteers responded to his call William Albert Mc Neill of Cloone Co Leitrim is registered on the Roll of Honour for the Great War The only particulars given are that he entered Wilson s Hospital in Multyfarnam in Septemer of 1906 aged 10 and a half and was provided for by his parents until 1911 In 1914 he is described as being in business in Liverpool In 1915 he enlisted with the Lancashire Fusiliers and he survived the war The Rising of 1916 made little impression on the rest of the country outside Dublin It was the execution of it s leaders that caused a certain outrage and an understanding of what it was about The Cloone Company of Volunteers was founded in 1918 Arms were in short supply so hurley sticks were substituted for training and drilling sessions Sunnaghmore was one of the designated training locations The R I C transferred from Cloone barracks to Mohill in 1920 Nevertheless it was burned almost immediately after their departure The road between Mohill and Cloone was constantly being cut by local activists to impede the movements of the British soldiers and the Black and Tans During the Civil War a Freestate soldier named Keane whose mother was a native of Cloone was mistakenly shot dead While the years of the Great War was a time of certain prosperity for Irish farmers the leaner years of the late 1920 s and the Economic War of the 1930 s brought them to their knees A decision by the Government of the day not to repay loans to Britain that facilitated Irish tenants to buy out their properties resulted in Britain responding by slapping a 20 tax on all Irish produce This lead to rampant unemployment poor prices for produce and livestock and hardship all round Road making was one form of employment available at the time Large stones were quarried and broken up by hand with sledge and hammer and spread as road cover Earlier under the Grand Jury system of local government the road contractors as they were known at the time were hired to repair or upgrade roads in certain areas farmers were able to supplement their income by hiring out their horse and cart for the purpose of carting stones and taking the load to where it was needed When Co Councils were introduced in 1899 it took charge of road making but the same method remained roads were still rough and stoney Tarring of roads as we know them did not start until the 1960 s In 1932 Cloone Co Operative Store was opened with the support of some local farmers Originally it was located at the Grange but moved to its present premises soon after opening It was a thriving centre for agricultural needs up to the time it closed in 1960 At that time the main retail outlets in the village were Pope s hardware and grocery O Carrolls and Mc Garry s drapers There were four public houses Creegan s Brady s Mc Namee s and Popes Fairs were still a feature of the village and were held on the Fairgreen which was situated where the Community Centre is today What was known as fair customs tolls were collected at Mitchell s on one side of the village and at Creegan s hill on the other side These tolls were a type of tax imposed on those who sold at the fair In former times monies collected were paid as rent to the landlord Tradesmen of all kinds abounded in the area blacksmiths cartmakers shoemakers tailors The limekiln at Tullyoran was the main outlet for making lime Corn mills within the parish were located at Killaveha Harte s mill and Murphy s at Cloonsarn in Aughavas Another very old mill was situated at Keeldra and probably belong to the landlord William West James Taigue and Michael Donaghue were bone setters of some note and resided in Aughnaglace In the days when group water schemes were non existent a pump at the priests house supplied some of the needs of the village while what was called the best water in Ireland was drawn from Scott s

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  • Cloone & Aughavas Parishes Website - Parish Priest's of Cloone
    based on Parish Records The History of Ardagh by James McNamee Bishop of Ardagh and Clonmacnois and from the Index of Clergy 1836 1980 Based on the Catholic Directories compiled Longford Historical Society Parish Priests Cloone Curates of Cloone Nicholas Mac Thecheadháin 1400 Giolla Iosa Mac Thecheadhain 1400 Annadh Mac Thecheadhain Sean Mac Thecheadhain 1421 Eugene Kean 1625 Giolla na Naomh MacThecheadhain 1421 Denis Gaffney 1694 1714 Pol Mac Thecheadhain 1428 Hugh Cannon 1704 1714 Tadhg Mac Giolla Shuiligh 1470 James McTiernan 1714 1744 Aodh Mac Conmidhe 1522 Francis Moran 1704 1714 Brian O Duibhgeannain 1677 John Kean 1744 Thomas Flynn Bishop of Ardagh 1704 1718 Anthony Dunne 1798 Hugh Brady 1744 James Maguaran 1831 1834 John Curran 1764 Laurence Pinkman 1837 1840 Charles Redehan 1798 Farrell Duffy 1841 1842 John Waldron 1825 Francis Kiernan 1841 1846 James McKiernan 1828 1850 Edward Duffy 1846 1851 Charles Flynn 1850 1877 Patrick Sheridan 1854 1855 Thomas Cahill 1877 1882 trans Killenummery Thomas Cahill 1855 1856 Francis O Beirne 1882 1885 John Brady 1858 1862 James Sheridan 1885 1887 Trans Annaduff John O Farrell 1863 1869 Thomas Lynch 1887 1892 James Sheridan 1870 1874 Farrell Sheridan 1892 1894 Thomas Cahill 1875 79 Felix Doherty 1894 1895 Trans Mohill Thomas Hourican 1879 1880 Thomas Boylan 1905 1917 John Quinn 1881 1882 Thomas Deniston 1917 1933 Matt Conefrey 1882 1883 Peter Conefrey 1933 1939 Philip Maguire 1883 1884 Patrick Clancy 1939 1964 William Grey 1884 1885 Edward Boylan 1964 1967 Transferred to Gowna Bernard Geraty 1886 1887 Patrick Frawley 1967 1978 died 1980 Peter McNamara 1887 1888 Peter Bohan 1978 1995 died 24th July 1995 James Dawson 1888 1899 Michael Skelly 1890 1891 Francis Cahill 1892 1893 Francis O Reilly 1893 1894 James Dawson 1894 1897 Henry Doyle 1902 1903 Peter Butler 1905 1906 Francis

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  • Cloone & Aughavas Parishes Website - Townlands of Cloone
    of the oats A very interesting and archaeological pass runs from Gortahoirke along the Sheehaun drain towards Annaghmaconway called the Saint s Walk It ends at a spot called Cealldra which means burial ground for infants It appears that in ancient times deceased infants were brought from the Church at Cloone this way to be buried in a special plot Hence the name The Saints Walk and a very appropriate one too Drumharkin Glebe Droim Ui Arcain Harkin s Ridge The Clann Arcain were a branch of the Conmaicne Rein Bk of Fenagh This interpretation is the one given by Pinkman and there is considerable doubt about it Harkin is not a common Cloone name Included in Drumharkan Glebe are 1 The Grange from Grainnseach meaning an outlying farm attached to a monastery no doubt in this case St Fraoch s ancient monastery Overlooking the Grange and on its southern side is a wooded ridge called Potter s Plantation called after Potter who was connected with it in some way The road round this ridge leads to the holy well of Criffer Ree to which there is a pattern every year 2 Annaghbrennan locally pronounced Annaghbrenaghan Brennaghan s Marsh or moor The Down Survey has Annaghbromhagan Eanach Broghagan The Moor or marsh of the rushes from Brobh a rush This is more likely to be the correct meaning Through this townland runs a road called Hurley Hill over which tradition says St Fraoch travelled from his monastery at Cloone to the home of his sister Nemald at Gortnalougher 3 Streamstown Baile Sruthan is a name no doubt conceived in landlord times The extreme southern portion of the townland is called the Glebe meaning church lands A century or more ago this townland was owned by the local Protestant minister A spot in the Glebe of scrub land is called Cooldao Coill Dubh the black wood Drumlegga roim Leacach The hill ridge abounding in flagstones Drimna Droimne Hill Ridges Included in Drumna is Lismaciniff Lios Mhic Chonduibh McNiff s Fort Pinkman It might also mean Lios meacain Dhuibh the fort surrounded by comfrey which is a common herb or weed Dunavinally Dun Abhann Shailigh The fort by the river of the willows or sallies This townland lies in the extreme north of the parish and is locally called Sallyfield no doubt a translation from Saileach the willow Edenbawn Ladan Ban The hill brow of the lea ground or dry pasture land Included in this townland is Gleann meaning valley This small area borders Gubbs Edergole Eadar Ghabhal a place between two river prongs Esker Eiscir A ridge of high land Generally eiscir is applied to a sandy ridge but sand is not found in this Esker Gorteenoran Goirtin Uarain The little field of the spring well Fuaran or uaran means a living fountain of fresh or cold water springing from the earth Colgan Camber Gort na Cam Darach The field of the crooked oak Locally called Camber this townland straddles both

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  • Cloone & Aughavas Parishes Website - Map of Cloone Parish
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  • Cloone-Aughavas Parish Photo Gallery - Cloone Church Finished Job
    Newsletter Aughavas Cloone Photo Gallery Contact Us Menu News Photo Content Menus Newsletter Photo Gallery Cloone Church Finished Job St Mary s Cloone upon completion Aughavas Cloone Parish Website eMail

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  • Cloone-Aughavas Parish Photo Gallery - Cloone Parish
    Home About Us Newsletter Aughavas Cloone Photo Gallery Contact Us Menu News Photo Content Menus Newsletter Photo Gallery Cloone Parish Aughavas Cloone Parish Website eMail aughavascloone gmail com

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  • Cloone-Aughavas Parish Photo Gallery - Aughavas Church Photos
    Home About Us Newsletter Aughavas Cloone Photo Gallery Contact Us Menu News Photo Content Menus Newsletter Photo Gallery Aughavas Church Photos Aughavas Cloone Parish Website eMail aughavascloone gmail com

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  • Cloone-Aughavas Parish Photo Gallery - Cloone Church Renovations
    About Us Newsletter Aughavas Cloone Photo Gallery Contact Us Menu News Photo Content Menus Newsletter Photo Gallery Cloone Church Renovations New roof project Aughavas Cloone Parish Website eMail aughavascloone gmail

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