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  • Your Healthcare Team - Arthritis Ireland
    rheumatologist if you need special care or treatment They can also refer you to other relevant health professionals Your Rheumatology Nurse Nurses who are trained in arthritis care can assist your doctor in your treatment They can also offer structured patient and family education and support services including a telephone helpline Some nurses are also skilled in prescribing medications and joint injections Your Occupational Therapist Occupational Therapists OTs are health professionals who help people with arthritis to function independently at home in the workplace and in the community They can teach you how to reduce strain on your joints while doing everyday activities which may involve using splints or other assistive devices OTs also teach practical stress management techniques to use in everyday life Your Physiotherapist The best way to find out what exercises are best for you is to see a chartered physiotherapist Physiotherapists have a complete understanding of how the body works and will work with you to design a treatment plan and exercise programme that meets your needs In addition to exercise they may also use manual or electrotherapy to help with symptom control Your Social Worker Arthritis can affect many aspects of your life and at times can make simple tasks difficult Family and friends may tell you how well you look yet the truth is you are not feeling well Social workers can help you and your family deal with these challenges Your Pharmacist Pharmacists are health professionals who dispense medications and can teach you the best way to use them They will fill your prescription for medicines and can explain their actions and side effects Your Dietitian Dietitians Nutritionists can help people with arthritis learn ways to plan prepare and eat balanced nutritious meals that will help you in achieve and maintain a healthy

    Original URL path: http://www.arthritisireland.ie/go/information/treatments_care/your_healthcare_team (2016-02-07)
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  • Treatments - Arthritis Ireland
    in the joints making it easier to relax Because the water supports your weight the range of movement in your joints should also increase With a water temperature usually set between 33 36 degrees Celsius warmer than a standard swimming pool hydrotherapy differs from swimming because it involves special exercises that you do in a warm water pool Scientific studies have shown that hydrotherapy can improve strength and general fitness in people with various types of arthritis The exercises can be tailored to your individual needs so you can start slowly and gradually build up your strength and flexibility The extra support that the water provides may make you feel like you can do more exercise than normal so be careful not to overdo it The exercise and the warmth of the water may make you feel tired after treatment but this is quite normal In general hydrotherapy is one of the safest treatments for arthritis and back pain Occupational Therapy If you are experiencing difficulty with day to day tasks like washing dressing cooking and cleaning you may benefit from visiting an occupational therapist They have a wealth of expertise on what equipment is available to assist you with a particular task They may also be able to supply on temporary loan some of the more expensive items Adaptations may include ergonomic cutlery kettle tippers bath rails grabbers walkers stair lifts Your GP or consultant can put you in touch with an occupational therapist There may be one at your local hospital or they may visit you at home You can also view products that have been deemed suitable for people with arthritis by our Easy to Use commendation programme while Assist Ireland also provide information on recommended products For a full listing of private occupational therapists in Ireland please visit www privateOT ie Podiatry Podiatry or chiropody specializes in care of the foot and can make a big difference to mobility and walking ability in people with arthritis The feet and ankles provide us with the ability to do some of the most essential tasks in life like walking and standing but are also two of the most arthritis affected areas If you visit a podiatrist an appointment can be made through your GP or independently in some cases they will closely examine the way you walk gait analysis to assess the range of motion pressure on the foot forces on the joints and the way you protect your painful foot An x ray and ultrasound scans may also be carried out to get a better idea of your condition You may then be prescribed with orthotic insoles and shoes which are designed with good support and ease of movement in mind Complementary Therapies As their name suggests these types of therapies are designed to complement and work alongside conventional medicine and treatments not replace them They concentrate on treating the whole person Even if your usual drug treatment is working well you may be curious to know

    Original URL path: http://www.arthritisireland.ie/go/information/treatments_care/treatments (2016-02-07)
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  • My Health Organiser - Arthritis Ireland
    help you play a more active role in your treatment by providing you with somewhere to store all of your health records in one place Taking control and playing an active part in your treatment is an important element of managing your arthritis effectively Things like making note of what your doctor has told you and preparing a list of questions you want to ask him in advance of your appointment can make a real difference to how you are treated and how you feel As well as a space for recording a diagnosis treatment or advice your doctor gives you there is also an appointment keeper where you can make note of upcoming appointments take notes on the pain you are feeling on a scale and a body outline to mark with an X where the pain is located These will help you to explain to your doctor the exact level of pain your are experiencing and its exact location Order your copy of My Health Organiser for free today by emailing with your name address and the type of arthritis that you have Arthritis Ireland on Facebook Arthritis Ireland on Twitter Arthritis Ireland on YouTube Arthritis Ireland on

    Original URL path: http://www.arthritisireland.ie/go/information/treatments_care/my_health_organiser (2016-02-07)
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  • Courses - Arthritis Ireland
    With Arthritis Booklets Exercise Medical Cards Other Resources Ezine Forums Blog Shop Big News Magazine Frequently Asked Questions Helpline Let s Talk Arthritis Peer Support Home Information Self Management Courses Self Management Courses print version send to a friend share on facebook We run a number of different courses to empower and educate you to become an effective self manager of your arthritis The Living Well with Arthritis course is a 6 week programme designed based on the Stanford University developed model Find out more here The Breaking the Pain Cycle course is a half day workshop designed to give you a taste of what self management is all about Find out more here If you would like to become a Leader in self management to deliver our courses Find out more here Arthritis Ireland on Facebook Arthritis Ireland on Twitter Arthritis Ireland on YouTube Arthritis Ireland on Google Plus Arthritis Ireland on LinkedIn Quicklinks Information About Arthritis Treatments Care Self Management Arthritis Your Life Booklets Exercise Medical Cards Other Resources Helpline Let s Talk Arthritis Peer Support Self Management Courses About Self Management Living Well With Arthritis Living Well With Arthritis Online Breaking the Pain Cycle Get Involved Fundraise

    Original URL path: http://www.arthritisireland.ie/go/information/self_management/courses (2016-02-07)
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  • Arthritis Ireland - Become a Self-Management Leader - Arthritis Ireland
    Magazine Frequently Asked Questions Helpline Let s Talk Arthritis Peer Support Home Information Self Management Become a Leader Arthritis Ireland on Facebook Arthritis Ireland on Twitter Arthritis Ireland on YouTube Arthritis Ireland on Google Plus Arthritis Ireland on LinkedIn Quicklinks Information About Arthritis Treatments Care Self Management Arthritis Your Life Booklets Exercise Medical Cards Other Resources Helpline Let s Talk Arthritis Peer Support Self Management Courses About Self Management Living

    Original URL path: http://www.arthritisireland.ie/go/information/self_management/become_a_leader (2016-02-07)
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  • Diet With Arthritis - Arthritis Ireland
    foods You will probably find that everyone wants to give you advice on what to eat and what not to eat Remember that everyone reacts differently to specific foods and that you have to work out for yourself what suits you best Being Overweight Carrying excess weight is a common problem for people with arthritis Certain drugs such as steroids can lead to weight gain and others such as non steroidal anti inflammatories NSAIDs can lead to stomach problems making dietary choices harder Some people may find that being unable to exercise or prepare fresh food means that they put on weight easily Others get trapped in a similar cycle during a flare up but one in which they are too tired to eat and consequently lose weight becoming even more exhausted Eating a balanced diet is key to maintaining a healthy weight Controlling your weight is often the most effective thing you can do to reduce the symptoms of arthritis Even a small weight loss can reduce strain on the hips back knees and feet if you are too heavy And making sure you are not underweight should help to give your body the necessary strength and nutrition to get through a flare up and to fight disease A healthy body weight is achieved by balancing the energy intake in our diet with the energy we use through activity However every individual has unique nutritional requirements depending on your age gender body size and level of activity A guideline daily intake is 2 000 kilocalories known as kcal for an active woman and 2 500 kilocalories for an active man If you need to gain weight eating slightly larger quantities of the healthier foods is the best approach so that you are taking in more calories Rather than simply eating more fried foods and chocolate which won t help your overall health in the long run Try things such as having an extra slice of toast at breakfast or an extra helping of pasta or rice Controlling your Diet Lots of foods particularly processed foods contain hidden fat sugar and salt Preparing your own food allows you to control what you are eating If you have difficulties cooking from scratch but need to lose weight choose the low fat versions of ready meals from the supermarket checking the calorie and salt content on the back of the packaging You should always consult your doctor or nurse before embarking on a weight loss programme as it is important to lose weight in the correct way crash diets can harm your body Breaking it Down Eating a healthy diet is about getting a variety of food from different food groups In general a healthy diet is one that is high in fruit and vegetables high in starch and fibre low in fatty foods and salt low in added sugars A balanced diet contains carbohydrates protein fat vitamins and minerals and fibre Carbohydrates provide us with energy Protein is essential for growth

    Original URL path: http://www.arthritisireland.ie/go/information/living_with_arthritis/diet_with_arthritis (2016-02-07)
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  • Parenting With Arthritis - Arthritis Ireland
    with arthritis During the last 12 weeks the joints and muscles may be affected and problems with weight bearing joints hips knees ankles and feet may become worse due to increased weight Muscle spasms in the back can occur as the uterus grows and the spine curves slightly to support it leading to pain numbness and tingling in the legs In the last 12 weeks breathing can be difficult especially if your arthritis affects your lungs or rib joints and you may experience shortness of breath if this occurs you should rest whenever you can Delivery The big day has arrived Many women with arthritis can have a normal labour and there are many different positions in which you can give birth so if for example you have difficulty because you cannot move your legs enough in one position the midwife will discuss with you some other suitable positions In some cases women with arthritis will be advised to deliver their baby by C section but this is not common If your arthritis affects your spine getting an epidural may not be possible This is a procedure in which pain medication is injected between the vertebrae directly into the outer layer of the spinal canal In this instance you should discuss alternative pain relief methods with your doctor before delivery and if a C section is necessary it may need to be done under general anaesthetic Babies So the hard work is done now right Well many women do feel a sense of relief after the birth but some also feel sorrow or a combination of the two If you have rheumatoid arthritis you may experience a flare up in the weeks following your pregnancy at the same time as you are adjusting to your new role as a parent Other diseases including scleroderma may become more active after delivery too If you are on medications that suppress your immune system it is important that you are extra vigilant for infection as you may be more prone to it than others but the majority of these infections can be cleared up quickly and easily with antibiotics Breastfeeding If you would like to breastfeed you should discuss the best medication choices with your doctor as certain medications can interfere with it Feeding may mean sitting in the same position for a long time on a daily basis so make sure you are comfortable This may involve using cushions under your elbows a special support or a small bean bag Carrying and lifting Many parents with arthritis find it easier to lift their baby using their larger joints like their elbows or forearms A sling can also be useful in the early stages before babies become too heavy at around nine months Other parents use baby carriers or pushchairs Equipment Deciding what equipment is suitable for both you and your child can take a bit of research Try to choose things that are Easy to Use The idea that reputable brands will

    Original URL path: http://www.arthritisireland.ie/go/information/living_with_arthritis/parenting_with_arthritis (2016-02-07)
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  • Caring for a Person With Arthritis - Arthritis Ireland
    facebook Looking after and caring for someone with arthritis is a challenge You need to achieve the right balance between providing support and motivation without being overprotective Most people with arthritis will wish to retain as much control over their lives as possible and you need to help them to retain their independence This might mean that in certain circumstances help may not be wanted This can be difficult to judge and you must be sensitive to signs to stand back and not insist on helping with a particular task or activity For example if the person you care for usually stands up from a chair on their own then it is best not to try and help them unless they appear to be severely struggling or request assistance Remember that all the answers are just a phone call away on the Arthritis Ireland helpline 1890 252 846 Arthritis Ireland also runs a programme for carers Caring Hands and information on being a carer can also be found on this website in Arthritis Ireland s Caring for a Person with Arthritis information booklet Arthritis Ireland on Facebook Arthritis Ireland on Twitter Arthritis Ireland on YouTube Arthritis Ireland on Google Plus

    Original URL path: http://www.arthritisireland.ie/go/information/living_with_arthritis/caring_for_a_person_with_arthritis (2016-02-07)
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