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  • Board of Directors - Arthritis Ireland
    in their own right Our board meets on a regular basis and has a number of sub committees that progress the work outside of the board fully engaging in a supportive role with the staff of Arthritis Ireland Our board is made up of three constituent parts each constituent contributing skills and expertise in their own way The three constituent parts clearly defined in our articles of association are 4 Elected Directors This type of director is nominated by the volunteer branch network and elected by our members at our AGM Elected directors are generally people living with arthritis and bring a personal experience of the disease area to the board but in all cases bring other skills to further the cause 4 Society Directors This group is made up of three representatives from The Irish Society for Rheumatology and one from The Irish Rheumatology Health Professionals Society providing a very important link to our medical stakeholders and patients alike 7 Ordinary Directors Directors making up this grouping are co opted from time to time based on the needs of the organisation whether they be fundraising marketing governance specialist interest areas or other needs The current Board of Directors John O Flynn Chairman Dr Frances Stafford Deputy Peter Boyd Anne Marie Healy Prof David Kane Conor Kavanagh Michael Kelly Eimear Lyons Erica Mitchell Anne Plunkett Mr Bill Quinlan Seoirse Smith John Tuohy Dr Bryan Whelan Prof Gerry Wilson Board sub committees Services Oversees the development of our services to ensure we are providing the appropriate support to people living with arthritis Governance Deals with all elements of the audit finance and remuneration of employees Medical Scientific Responsible for our work in the area of research and our search for a cure Fundraising Communications Develops new and innovative ways to raise

    Original URL path: http://www.arthritisireland.ie/go/about_us/corporate_governance/board_of_directors (2016-02-07)
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  • Affiliated Membership - Arthritis Ireland
    for Services Fundraising Heroes Financials Where Our Money Comes From How we spend money Salaries Guiding Principles for Fundraising Annual Reports AGM 2015 Notice AGM Minutes Articles of Association Summarised Statements Our Staff Governance Board of Directors Affiliated Membership Data Protection Statement Contact Us Home Our Work Governance Affiliated Membership Affiliated Membership print version send to a friend share on facebook Arthritis Ireland recognises that working with relevant external partners and networks is important to gain specialist input and skills to achieve its goals To this end we are members of the following organisations The Irish Charity Tax Reform Group ICTR The Medical Research Charity Group Disability Federation Ireland The Marketing Institute of Ireland Fundraising Ireland Legacy Promotion Ireland Arthritis Ireland on Facebook Arthritis Ireland on Twitter Arthritis Ireland on YouTube Arthritis Ireland on Google Plus Arthritis Ireland on LinkedIn Quicklinks Information About Arthritis Treatments Care Self Management Arthritis Your Life Booklets Exercise Medical Cards Other Resources Helpline Let s Talk Arthritis Peer Support Self Management Courses About Self Management Living Well With Arthritis Living Well With Arthritis Online Breaking the Pain Cycle Get Involved Fundraise Mini Marathon Take on a Challenge Donate Leave a Legacy Corporate Fundraising In Your

    Original URL path: http://www.arthritisireland.ie/go/about_us/corporate_governance/affiliated_membership (2016-02-07)
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  • Data Protection Statement - Arthritis Ireland
    parties and is used by Arthritis Ireland only in line with the purpose for which you provided it Your personal data may also be anonymised and used for statistical purposes Arthritis Ireland keeps information in order to provide services of the highest standard possible After a period of 10 years without contact Arthritis Ireland will automatically delete all of your personal information from its database Requests regarding data supplied via this website On request Arthritis Ireland will supply copies of your personal data to you If you wish to obtain such copies you must write to the Arthritis Ireland at the address below or email You should include any personal identifiers which you supplied earlier via the website e g Name address phone number e mail address Your request is free of charge will be dealt with as soon as possible and will take not more than 40 days to process If you discover that this office holds inaccurate information about you you can request that Arthritis Ireland correct that information Such a request must be in writing or via e mail In certain circumstance you may also request that data which you have supplied via the website be deleted Complaints about data processed via the website If you are concerned about how personal data are processed via this website please do not hesitate to bring such concerns to the attention of Arthritis Ireland at the contact details below Collection and use of technical information including IP addresses This website uses cookie technology A cookie is a little piece of text stored by the browser on your computer at the request of our server We may use cookies to deliver content specific to your interests and to save your personal preferences so you do not have to re enter them each time you connect to our website Our cookies are not available to other websites You are always free to decline our cookies if your browser permits or to ask your browser to indicate when a cookie is being sent You can also delete cookie files from your computer at your discretion Note that if you decline our cookies or ask for notification each time a cookie is being sent this may affect your ease of use of this website Technical details in connection with visits to this website are logged by our internet service provider for our statistical purposes No information is collected that could be used by us to identify website visitors The technical details logged are confined to the following items the IP address of the visitor s web server the top level domain name used for example ie com org net the previous website address from which the visitor reached us including any search terms used clickstream data which shows the traffic of visitors around this web site for example pages accessed and documents downloaded the type of web browser used by the website visitor The site will record any data you supply to us for

    Original URL path: http://www.arthritisireland.ie/go/about_us/corporate_governance/data_protection_statement (2016-02-07)
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  • Your Joints - Arthritis Ireland
    News Magazine Frequently Asked Questions Helpline Let s Talk Arthritis Peer Support Home Information About Arthritis Your Joints Your Joints print version send to a friend share on facebook Our skeleton is made up of bones which are rigid inflexible objects which require help to allow us to move This help comes in the form of joints at the point where bones make contact Arthritis damages joints that is why people experience joint pain when they move The joint operates by connecting the bones with elastic band type chords called ligaments which keep them in place A protective coating called cartilage covers the bone surface at the joint to prevent bones from rubbing directly against each other The joint is surrounded by a capsule also and the space within the joint joint cavity contains a liquid called synovial fluid which provides nutrients to the joint and cartilage It is produced by the synovial membrane or synovium which lines the joint cavity Movement of the joint is operated by the muscles attached to the bones as they lengthen and shorten For example when the bicep shortens and the tricep lengthens the lower part of the arm is pulled upwards towards the shoulder Arthritis affects joints in many different ways levels of joint pain can also vary depending on the type and severity of arthritis you have To find out more about how arthritis affects your joints read our information booklet on your arthritis type NEXT Types of Arthritis Arthritis Ireland on Facebook Arthritis Ireland on Twitter Arthritis Ireland on YouTube Arthritis Ireland on Google Plus Arthritis Ireland on LinkedIn Quicklinks Information About Arthritis Treatments Care Self Management Arthritis Your Life Booklets Exercise Medical Cards Other Resources Helpline Let s Talk Arthritis Peer Support Self Management Courses About Self Management Living Well

    Original URL path: http://www.arthritisireland.ie/go/information/about_arthritis/your_joints (2016-02-07)
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  • Information About the Types of Arthritis - Arthritis Ireland - Arthritis Ireland
    can go on for a long time or come and go When it is active known as a flare up you may feel unwell The body s natural defences the immune system are part of the problem in rheumatoid arthritis It somehow puts itself into reverse and attacks certain parts of the body instead of protecting it This auto immune reaction occurs mainly in the joints but in a flare up other organs can be affected It is not known what causes the immune system to react in this way Click here to download the Living with Rheumatoid Arthriti s booklet for more information on this type of arthritis Fibromyalgia Fibromyalgia is another of the more common types of arthritis that causes widespread and severe pain aching and fatigue but affects the muscles ligaments and tendons rather than the joints It may affect one part of the body or several different areas such as the limbs neck and back Click here to download the Living with Fibromyalgia booklet for more information on this type of arthritis Psoriatic Arthritis Some people who live with the skin condition psoriasis also develop another of the types of arthritis known as psoriatic arthritis It causes inflammation in and around the joints Psoriatic arthritis can affect most joints but typically causes problems in fingers and toes with pitting and discoloration of nails About a third of people with psoriatic arthritis also have spondylitis a stiff painful back or neck caused by inflammation in the spine You can find out more about the condition in our Understanding Arthritis information booklet Ankylosing Spondylitis Ankylosing spondylitis AS is another form of inflammatory arthritis Its symptoms are centred around pain and inflammation in the joints of the lower back Ankylosing means stiffening spondylitis means inflammation of the spine If left untreated the joints of the spine may become fused bridged by bone and lose their movement Click here to download the Ankylosing Spondylitis booklet for more information on this type of arthritis Gout Gout is one of the oldest types of arthritis where crystals build up in the body and cause joints to become very painful Once treated gout is not a problem for most people Gout symptoms are caused by uric acid crystals in the joints We all have some uric acid in our blood but most of us pass out enough in our urine to keep down the amount in our blood When there is too much uric acid in the tissues it can form crystals These crystals can form in and around joints inflammation swelling and severe pain Click here to download the Living with Gout booklet for more information on this type of arthritis Juvenile Arthritis Approximately 1 000 children in Ireland have arthritis Most types of arthritis in children come under the general heading of juvenile arthritis JA or juvenile idiopathic arthritis to give it its official title JA symptoms include inflammation pain and swelling in one or more joints Click here to download

    Original URL path: http://www.arthritisireland.ie/go/information/about_arthritis/types_of_arthritis (2016-02-07)
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  • Lupus - Arthritis Ireland
    your heart brain or kidneys lupus can have more serious complications It is important that you organise regular check ups with your doctor to monitor this inflammation How is lupus diagnosed There is no single test to diagnose lupus Based on the history of your illness a physical examination and blood tests your doctor will be able to diagnose you Test results help to distinguish lupus from other conditions that may have similar symptoms A number of different blood tests may be used Anti nuclear antibody ANA test Anti double stranded DNA anti dsDNA antibody test Anti Ro antibody test Antiphospholipid antibody test Complement level test Erythrocyte sedimentation rate ESR test Kidney and liver function tests Blood cell counts These tests can also be helpful in monitoring your condition after diagnosis Tests to check on your heart lungs liver and spleen are also important Depending on which organs your doctor thinks may be involved you may have x rays an ultrasound scan a computerised tomography CT scan or a magnetic resonance imaging MRI scan A urine test can show if there s protein or blood in your urine This can help doctors to recognise a problem in your kidneys at a very early stage You may need further tests such as kidney filtration tests What treatments are there for lupus There is no single treatment for lupus but a combination of drugs and self help measures which will vary depending on your particular symptoms can help to keep it under control Drugs may include anti inflammatory drugs steroid tablets creams or injections drugs which suppress your immune system drugs to control high blood pressure and high cholesterol Pregnancy and lupus If you have lupus and are planning to have a baby it is important to speak to your doctor first

    Original URL path: http://www.arthritisireland.ie/go/information/about_arthritis/types_of_arthritis/lupus (2016-02-07)
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  • Polymyalgia Rheumatica Information - Arthritis Ireland - Arthritis Ireland
    symptoms of polymyalgia rheumatica PMR particularly in your shoulders and thighs PMR can come on suddenly appearing within a fortnight and sometimes just after a flu It is unlike the sort of pain or stiffness you experience after exercising Instead it is often widespread and made worse by movement It can also disrupt your sleep at night How is polymyalgia rheumatica PMR diagnosed There is no specific test to diagnose polymyalgia rheumatica Based on your symptoms tests and a physical examination your doctor will make the diagnosis Inflammation alone isn t enough to confirm the diagnosis as it s associated with many other conditions Other conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis will need to be ruled out with some other tests X rays or ultrasound scans of your shoulders and hips may also be necessary What treatments are there for polymyagia rheumatica PMR Steroid tablets Steroid tablets are the most common treatment for polymyalgia rheumatica PMR They are not a cure but they can reduce your symptoms symptoms within a day or 2 once you start treatment Your treatment will probably last for 2 years or more depending on your symptoms Your doctor may suggest you also take the following bisphosphonates such as risedronate or alendronate to protect you against developing osteoporosis painkillers or non steroidal anti inflammatory drugs NSAIDs to reduce your pain and stiffness If you are finding that your symptoms are not improving with steroids you may be sent by your doctor to see a specialist who may prescribe methotrexate tablets alongside the steroid tablets Methotrexate is used to treat several different types of rheumatic disease including polymyalgia rheumatica Because one of its actions is to reduce the activity of the immune system it can leave you prone to infection and it is important to tell your doctor

    Original URL path: http://www.arthritisireland.ie/go/information/about_arthritis/types_of_arthritis/polymyalgia_rheumatica (2016-02-07)
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  • Diagnosis - Arthritis Ireland
    member or friend will help you relax and remember to ask the right questions Download our Let s Talk Arthritis information booklet for more information on communicating with your doctor Your health professional will make an arthritis diagnosis on the basis of your symptoms a physical examination and medical tests In some cases your GP will be able to give you an immediate diagnosis or they may have to refer you to a rheumatologist or orthopedic surgeon Testing for osteoarthritis OA Your GP will Check for any bony swellings and creaking joints any restricted movement joint tenderness or instability Give you a blood test to rule out other types of arthritis Perform X rays to confirm OA and to see how much damage has occurred An osteoarthritis diagnosis means that your GP will be your main contact for managing your condition You may also be referred to a physiotherapist for advice on keeping your joints mobile If your arthritis is severe the GP can refer you to a rheumatologist orthopaedic surgeon or pain specialist Living with Osteoarthritis will tell you more about what to expect when you visit your GP Testing for rheumatoid arthritis RA Your GP will Examine your joints and skin and test your muscle strength Carry out blood tests looking for inflammation Perform X rays to find signs of damage to joints and bones A rheumatoid arthritis diagnosis means that your GP will refer you to other healthcare professionals including a rheumatologist and physiotherapist You will also be prescribed drugs to control the condition and reduce the inflammation Download are booklet on Drugs and Complementary Therapies for more information arthritis tests and arthritis diagnosis The booklet Living with Rheumatoid Arthritis will tell you more about managing your condition You can also contact the Arthritis Ireland helpline on 1890 252 846 with any questions you may have on any aspect of arthritis Things to remember Being diagnosed with arthritis can be a very intimidating experience especially if you don t know where to turn for help Initial feelings of fear and anger are a completely normal first reaction but by taking the right steps a diagnosis of arthritis does not have to alter your quality of life Ring If you are looking for confidential support and information from people who have experienced an arthritis diagnosis firsthand you should contact the Arthritis Ireland helpline on locall 1890 252 846 Learn Learning about your condition should help you to put your mind at ease but take care that what you read comes from a reputable source Arthritis Ireland s information booklets can be a good place to start as can some of our frequently asked questions FAQs Partnership with health professionals Once you have been diagnosed prompt action will help you to avoid further damage to your joints so it s important that you work in partnership with your doctor to put together a treatment plan that best suits you Self Management Sign up to one of our Living Well

    Original URL path: http://www.arthritisireland.ie/go/information/treatments_care/diagnosis (2016-02-07)
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