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  • MSDS - Arthritis Ireland
    a friend share on facebook Musculoskeletal disorders MSDs is an umbrella term covering over 200 conditions that affect the muscles joints tendons ligaments peripheral nerves and supporting blood vessels causing pain and functional impairment Musculoskeletal disorders are among the most prevalent conditions in the world MSDs can be non specific or specific Specific MSD are specific and progressive rheumatic diseases such as arthritis which are not caused by work but may be made worse by work and affect smaller numbers Non specific MSDs are frequently caused by work and are the most common Some common causes include poor posture repetitive movements manual handling awkward movements forceful hand applications direct mechanical pressure on body tissue vibrations and cold work environment The immediate impact may be minute but when it occurs repeatedly the constant trauma causes damage Types of MSDs MSD Impact MSD Costs Ireland and MSDs Arthritis Ireland on Facebook Arthritis Ireland on Twitter Arthritis Ireland on YouTube Arthritis Ireland on Google Plus Arthritis Ireland on LinkedIn Quicklinks Information About Arthritis Treatments Care Self Management Arthritis Your Life Booklets Exercise Medical Cards Other Resources Helpline Let s Talk Arthritis Peer Support Self Management Courses About Self Management Living Well With Arthritis

    Original URL path: http://www.arthritisireland.ie/go/fit_for_work/msds (2016-02-07)
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  • Types of MSDs - Arthritis Ireland
    Polymyalgia Rheumatica Lupus Juvenile Arthritis Click here to visit our arthritis information section for more information on the specific MSDs mentioned above Non Specific MSDs Non specific MSDs are episodic conditions which may frequently be caused by or made worse by work They manifest themselves in different ways and may cause periods of intense discomfort and incapacity which may affect the ability of the individual worker to carry out their work They may also abate for long periods Many people with these conditions never seek treatment and most recover on their own but the conditions can cause significant absence from work or lost productivity Non specific MSDs are described in relation to two main categories 1 Back pain Back pain is a very common complaint and is episodic with half of the episodes being solved within a week and 90 going away within a month It can be described as recurrent if several episodes occur in one year for a duration of less than six months as acute if an episode lasts for less than six weeks as sub acute 7 12 weeks and as chronic if it endures for over 12 weeks Back pain is a recurrent problem for many people although this does not mean that symptoms will worsen For the majority of people pain will disappear on its own within four to six weeks For most people the cause of back pain is unknown It may arise from any number of pain sensitive structures in the lumbar spinal column including joints ligaments muscles and soft tissues Persons at high risk of low back pain include those whose jobs involve physical labour especially lifting pushing or pulling heavy objects or twisting during lifting Another risk factor for low back pain is cigarette smoking and poor physical fitness may

    Original URL path: http://www.arthritisireland.ie/go/fit_for_work/msds/types_of_msds (2016-02-07)
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  • MSD Impact - Arthritis Ireland
    undiagnosed in up to 40 of cases 67 of workers with MSDs reported that pain caused a significant reduction in their quality of life 49 of workers with MSDs were limited in the kind of work they were able to perform 25 of workers with MSDs have never seen a doctor about their pain Once workers become detached from the labour market their chances of finding meaningful work again are severely damaged Job retention and return to work programmes are contingent on patients receiving appropriate medical care as quickly as possible The risk of acquiring an MSD will increase as the age of the workforce goes up and that the impact of MSDs on work disability will intensify rather than diminish MSD patients generally do not have to be 100 fit for work to be able to return to their workplace Almost a quarter of European workers report that they have experienced muscular pain in their neck shoulders and upper limbs WRULDS It is estimated that half of the European population will suffer back pain at some time in their lives Back Pain The annual costs of this back pain have been estimated to exceed 12billion It is estimated that the total annual cost of low back pain in Europe was 12 3 billion in 1998 About 85 of people with back pain take less than seven days off yet this accounts for only half of the number of working days lost by back pain Half of the number of working days lost by back pain is accounted for by the 15 who are absent for over one month For back pain it is calculated that 80 of healthcare costs are generated by the 10 of those with chronic pain and disability Rheumatoid Arthritis RA Most people who acquire RA do so when they are of working age It is estimated that 40 of those with RA withdraw from the workforce within 5 years of diagnosis because of their condition SpA People with SpA conditions such as ankylosing spondylitis AS are three times as likely to be out of work as the general population Impact The effect that MSDs can have on an individuals ability to work and the time they may require to be absent from work means that MSDs have significant associated costs to the individual their family the employer and the wider economy Employer Increase in absenteeism Increase in presenteeism which is the loss of productivity in an employee while they are at work with an illness or incapacity Loss of productivity Reduced employee engagement morale Higher staff turnover recruitment and training costs Higher early retirement costs Individual Family Society loss of earnings essential for material well being increases poverty in society loss of an individual s identity social roles and social status Reduced quality of life brought on by job stress economic stress and family stress Healthcare costs such as doctor visits physiotherapy medical equipment alternative therapy medication etc reduced chance of returning to the labour

    Original URL path: http://www.arthritisireland.ie/go/fit_for_work/msds/msd_facts (2016-02-07)
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  • MSD Costs - Arthritis Ireland
    to physical therapy inpatient services pharmaceuticals and primary care 80 of healthcare costs are generated by the 10 of those with chronic back pain and disability For rheumatoid arthritis studies indicate that direct costs increase as functional capacity decreases making functional capacity a major cost driver Direct costs compared to indirect costs usually represent a minority of the total costs Indirect Costs Indirect costs of MSDs include lost work output attributable to a reduced capacity for activity such as lost productivity lost earnings lost opportunities for family members lost earnings of family members and lost tax revenue There are two main types of indirect costs most commonly measured in relation to ill health in employees Absence from work Presenteeism or loss of productivity in an employee while they are at work with an illness or incapacity Presenteeism is extremely difficult to measure and there are no Irish data on presenteeism costs As a result most estimates of indirect costs are based on absence from work data It is worth noting that the recording of sickness absence is rarely accurate as different organisations have different ways of recording absence in some cases employees complete records themselves in other cases managers must record the absence for them Furthermore records are subject to biases for example managers tend to underreport their own absence The only recent Irish analysis which exists was conducted by an economic consultancy Indecon 2006 which was commissioned to evaluate the impact of health and safety legislation in Ireland They estimated that the total annual cost of work related accidents and ill health was nearly 3 6 billion Within this they estimated that 1 8 billion was accounted for by lost output caused by temporary and permanent absence from work Another study by the Irish Business and Employers Confederation estimated that absence from work in Ireland s smaller employers they employ approximately 840 000 people was costing the Irish economy 692 million each year Other indirect costs Early retirement Indirect costs are also associated with early retirement among people with MSDs with studies estimating a rate of 30 50 Family productivity Indirect costs of ill health extend beyond lost productivity of the individual often impacting on the labour participation of family members Hiring help A further extension from work related indirect costs are additional costs associated with hiring household help Informal Care Provision of informal care is difficult to identify quantify and value what is considered informal care by some people may be considered normal by others it estimated that for RA the annual cost of informal care in Europe is 2 562 per patient Intangible costs These include psychosocial burden resulting in reduced quality of life such as job stress economic stress family stress and suffering Intangible costs are rarely included in cost calculations as it is almost impossible to properly express the intangible costs in monetary terms However the evaluation of intangible costs gives useful information regarding the price paid by people with MSDs in terms of quality

    Original URL path: http://www.arthritisireland.ie/go/fit_for_work/msds/msd_costs (2016-02-07)
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  • Ireland and MSDs - Arthritis Ireland
    print version send to a friend share on facebook It is difficult to quantify precisely the extent of MSDs in the working age population of Ireland due to inadequate data Despite this there is sufficient evidence in Ireland to argue strongly for MSDs to be a policy priority in the coming years Two of these key reasons are 1 The Irish workforce is ageing and with it the risk of increasing MSD prevalence over the next 20 or 30 years Experience from economies with older age distributions shows that the burden of MSDs can have significant economic and social consequences 2 The growth of obesity in Ireland is a risk factor for bone and joint conditions Data suggests that Ireland has the fourth highest prevalence of overweight and obese men in the EU and there are 300 000 Irish children who are clinically obese with those numbers increasing by 10 000 each year Classification In Ireland the Department of Social Protection includes only the following MSDs on its register of occupational diseases Bursae elbow and knee Cramps in the hand or forearm due to repetitive movements Inflammation of the tendons of the hand or forearm White finger Paralysis of the ulnar nerve Carpal tunnel syndrome Lateral epicondylitis These conditions focus predominantly on upper limb disorders while other EU countries more frequently include low back pain inflammatory conditions and spinal conditions This suggests that Ireland s official definition of MSDs may be unhelpfully narrow Document TRTMT2014v1 Arthritis Ireland on Facebook Arthritis Ireland on Twitter Arthritis Ireland on YouTube Arthritis Ireland on Google Plus Arthritis Ireland on LinkedIn Quicklinks Information About Arthritis Treatments Care Self Management Arthritis Your Life Booklets Exercise Medical Cards Other Resources Helpline Let s Talk Arthritis Peer Support Self Management Courses About Self Management Living Well With Arthritis

    Original URL path: http://www.arthritisireland.ie/go/fit_for_work/msds/ireland_msds (2016-02-07)
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  • About Fit for Work - Arthritis Ireland
    economy Yet conventional measures to improve productivity fail to take account of one of the most serious barriers to growing prosperity poor workforce health Ill health even in a favourable economic climate can reduce the aggregate level of labour productivity in an economy and damage the competitiveness and effectiveness of private and public sector organisations That is why Arthritis Ireland is leading the development of the Fit for Work programme in Ireland We are advocating that improvements in early intervention treatment and return to work practices could help people with even severe Musculoskeletal Disorders MSDs such as arthritis either stay in work or return to work sooner In 2007 a study by the Work Foundation found that there were often real health benefits associated with staying in or returning to work but that many employers clinicians and even employees felt that temporary or permanent withdrawal from employment was the only option The UK report achieved wide stakeholder interest when it was launched and stimulated Government thinking on early diagnosis and intervention of MSDs Focus and Aims Coalition Recommendations Timeline Fit for Work Europe Arthritis Ireland on Facebook Arthritis Ireland on Twitter Arthritis Ireland on YouTube Arthritis Ireland on Google Plus

    Original URL path: http://www.arthritisireland.ie/go/fit_for_work/about_fit_for_work (2016-02-07)
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  • Focus and Aims - Arthritis Ireland
    to collaborate to deliver policies that enable those living with musculoskeletal disorders MSDs to maintain active healthy lives and participate in the workforce which also serves to maintain the economy s productivity and competitiveness The Fit for Work project has a particular focus on the impact of MSDs and work participation and absenteeism We examined the impact of MSDs on an individual s ability to work and the adequacy of treatment and how this impacts on Ireland s economy and society as a whole We are now working to ensure that these findings and recommendations are used to inform both policy and practice by government healthcare professionals and employers in Ireland The Fit for Work project has looked in some detail at the impact that MSDs have on the working lives of thousands of Irish workers the adequacy of the treatment and support they receive their experiences at work the effect of their condition on their family and colleagues and the human and financial costs involved More specifically this project has sought to address each of the following questions What is the impact of MSDs on employment and economic performance in Ireland How is this likely to change in the context of future demographic workforce and lifestyle changes What is the relationship between work and MSDs What impact do biological psychological and social factors including workplace factors have on MSDs How well do employers governmental bodies GPs and occupational health professionals understand and deal with MSDs as they relate to the workplace How well equipped is the health sector to provide early intervention rehabilitation and other support for people with these conditions What early interventions can policy makers and employers deliver to ensure that those with MSDs retain their jobs maximise their quality of working life and their contribution to

    Original URL path: http://www.arthritisireland.ie/go/fit_for_work/about_fit_for_work/focus_aims (2016-02-07)
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  • Coalition - Arthritis Ireland
    Coalition print version send to a friend share on facebook NEXT Guidelines Arthritis Ireland on Facebook Arthritis Ireland on Twitter Arthritis Ireland on YouTube Arthritis Ireland on Google Plus Arthritis Ireland on LinkedIn Quicklinks Information About Arthritis Treatments Care Self Management Arthritis Your Life Booklets Exercise Medical Cards Other Resources Helpline Let s Talk Arthritis Peer Support Self Management Courses About Self Management Living Well With Arthritis Living Well With

    Original URL path: http://www.arthritisireland.ie/go/fit_for_work/about_fit_for_work/coalition (2016-02-07)
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