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  • Healthy Eating and Arthritis - Arthritis Ireland
    diet but eating a balance of healthy foods and maintaining a healthy weight can have a huge impact on your overall well being and your arthritis As well as ensuring that your body has all the essential nutrients to function eating healthily may help reduce the symptoms of arthritis both directly and by reducing the stress on your joints through weight loss If you are underweight a balanced diet should help you overcome exhaustion and gain healthy weight The aim of this booklet is to explain what makes up a healthy diet and what foods if any might be particularly beneficial or bad for people with arthritis In this booklet you will find A healthy lifestyle Why a healthy diet is important for people with arthritis What makes up a healthy diet The essential nutrients food groups How to maintain a healthy diet Shopping for food cooking staying healthy Interaction between food and arthritis Important nutrients particular foods that could help food myths Supplements The facts about popular supplements Other sources of help Dieticians and nutritionists weight loss groups The last word Download full booklet here Arthritis Ireland on Facebook Arthritis Ireland on Twitter Arthritis Ireland on YouTube Arthritis Ireland

    Original URL path: http://www.arthritisireland.ie/go/information/booklets/healthy_eating_arthritis (2016-02-07)
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  • Let'S Talk Arthritis - Arthritis Ireland
    with your rheumatologist at your medical appointment will allow you to share information and work together to make the best decisions about your health This will result in the best possible care for you It is important to know the right questions to ask your rheumatologist It is also really important that your rheumatologist for example knows about the things that are worrying you such as the level of pain you are experiencing where the pain is and whether the pain is getting worse At your medical appointment discuss your medication and treatment with your rheumatologist for example are you experiencing side effects or is the medication working In this booklet you will find During the Consultation What do patients learn from their consultation Before the Appointment Get the most from your appointment During the Appointment Steps to getting the most from your appointment Pain Management After the Appointment Remember to Take P A R T Take P A R T in your consultation Family Friends and Colleagues Glossary of Medical Terms Drugs Used in Treatment Download full booklet here Arthritis Ireland on Facebook Arthritis Ireland on Twitter Arthritis Ireland on YouTube Arthritis Ireland on Google Plus Arthritis Ireland on

    Original URL path: http://www.arthritisireland.ie/go/information/booklets/let_s_talk_arthritis (2016-02-07)
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  • What Is Fibromyalgia? - Fibromyalgia Information from Arthritis Ireland - Arthritis Ireland
    signs symptoms and medical problems that tend to occur together but are not related to a specific identifiable cause Fibromyalgia Symptoms Fibromyalgia is characterised by widespread muscle pain and fatigue The word fibromyalgia comes from the Latin term for fibrous tissue fibro and the Greek terms for muscle myo and pain algia Tender points are particular body locations that are usually somewhat tender for anyone but where people with fibromyalgia feel pain in response to very slight pressure these tender points are used in the diagnosis of fibromyalgia People who have fibromyalgia may also experience aching stiffness and tiredness which can be changeable throughout the day getting worse with activity Poor sleep quality and waking up without feeling refreshed is very common Simple chores or activities may prove difficult to undertake because of muscular fatigue or lack of energy Many people with fibromyalgia can experience emotional distress including anxiety and depression Fibromyalgia Treatments As fibromyalgia is a syndrome it may be difficult to treat Your GP or rheumatologist will be the primary source of this treatment referring you to other health professionals including a psychologist physiotherapist or occupational therapist as needed You will be required to play an active role in controlling your fibromyalgia working together with your health professionals There is no cure but the symptoms may be managed very successfully Your doctor may treat fibromyalgia with a variety of medications developed and approved for other purposes In this booklet you will find What is fibromyalgia What are the symptoms what might you experience What causes fibromyalgia What has been learned about the impact of trauma sleep disturbance or illness and fibromyalgia Getting a diagnosis Understanding the tender points of fibromyalgia Treatment and Taking Control What treatments are available and how you can take care of yourself Practicalities Getting

    Original URL path: http://www.arthritisireland.ie/go/information/booklets/living_with_fibromyalgia (2016-02-07)
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  • What Is Osteoarthritis? - Osteoarthritis Information from Arthritis Ireland - Arthritis Ireland
    is often undiagnosed Although it is uncommon before the age of 40 young people can develop it It is not known exactly why older people tend to develop it but it is probably due to bodily changes which come with old age such as the muscles becoming weaker putting on weight and the body becoming less able to heal itself Gender Osteoarthritis is more common and often more severe in women especially in the knees and hands It often starts after the menopause Obesity The effects of obesity on osteoarthritis are well documented Carrying extra weight puts pressure on weight bearing joints especially the hips knees and spine It also increases the chances of osteoarthritis worsening once it has developed Joint injury A major injury or operation on a joint may lead to osteoarthritis at that site later in life Normal activity and exercise are good for the joints and do not cause osteoarthritis However very hard repetitive activity may injure joints Exercising too soon after an injury has had time to heal properly may also lead to osteoarthritis in that joint later on It is always best to check with your doctor physiotherapist or nurse when it is safe to exercise after you have sustained an injury Heredity One common form of osteoarthritis nodal osteoarthritis runs strongly in families This particularly affects the hands of middle aged women In other common forms of osteoarthritis heredity plays a small part compared with obesity ageing and joint injury There are some very rare forms of osteoarthritis that start at a young age and run in families and these are linked with single genes that affect collagen an essential component of cartilage The standard explanation for osteoarthritis is that it is a result of wear and tear Studies of people who have led very similar lives show some will have virtually perfect joints while others have quite severe osteoarthritis Therefore it seems there must be an inbuilt susceptibility to or protection against osteoarthritis Other types of joint disease Osteoarthritis is sometimes caused by injury and damage from a different kind of joint disease years before For example people with rheumatoid arthritis can develop osteoarthritis in the joints that were most affected by rheumatoid inflammation What are the symptoms of osteoarthritis The early signs of osteoarthritis are so mild that they are often easy to miss The main symptoms are stiff and painful joints with the pain tending to be worse while exercising the joint and at the end of the day Stiffness usually wears off after resting but the joint may not move as freely or as far as normal and may creak or crack when moved Muscle strengthening exercises can prevent the joint giving way Symptoms can vary and you may have bad patches of a few weeks or months followed by better periods You may find that it depends on how much physical activity you do Joints may appear swollen In more advanced cases there may be constant pain and

    Original URL path: http://www.arthritisireland.ie/go/information/booklets/living_with_osteoarthritis (2016-02-07)
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  • Rheumatoid Arthritis Information - Arthritis Ireland - Arthritis Ireland
    the condition from drugs to keeping active and get a taste of the skills and strategies that will help you cope Rheumatoid arthritis is a condition that makes the joints in your body become inflamed It is the second most common form of arthritis Between one and three people in every hundred develop rheumatoid arthritis and it can start at any age Most of these people around three quarters are women Although you are more likely to develop rheumatoid arthritis in your middle years between 30 and 50 children young adults and older people can also get it Rheumatoid Arthritis Inflammation In rheumatoid arthritis your immune system attacks your joints and sometimes other parts of your body for no reason The attack can go on for a long time or come and go Managing Rheumatoid Arthritis There is plenty that can be done to help control rheumatoid arthritis and make it more manageable Many different professionals will work together to help you manage your arthritis but they are all aiming for the same goals to reduce inflammation and slow down or even stop any damage to your joints to relieve your symptoms like pain fatigue and stiffness and to help you get on with your life as well as possible In this booklet you will find Introducing rheumatoid arthritis What happens in rheumatoid arthritis what the causes are and what joints are affected How a diagnosis is reached How rheumatoid arthritis will affect you Managing your arthritis How to get the most from your team and what treatment you might be given Taking care of joints How to use and rest your joints how a rheumatoid arthritis diet exercise and complementary therapies might help Taking control Coping with pain and fatigue dealing with feelings and relationships how self management training

    Original URL path: http://www.arthritisireland.ie/go/information/booklets/living_with_rheumatoid_arthritis (2016-02-07)
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  • Physical Activity & Arthritis - Arthritis Ireland
    an important part of managing your arthritis Although it is not always easy to get started and stay motivated moving really is the best medicine As well as reducing the pain and inflammation of arthritis being active and exercising regularly improves joint support and lubrication helps with weight control and has many other health benefits including lowering blood pressure and stroke risk Striking the right balance of exercise types that best suit your needs and ability can take a little time and effort but this booklet is the right place to start Whether you want to discover tips on getting active and staying motivated or if it is the different types of exercise aerobic range of movement and muscle strengthening you wish to learn more about this short guide contains all the latest information on why staying active is an important part of the prescription In this booklet you will find Is there a difference between physical activity and exercise What are the benefits of physical activity and exercise How do I prepare for physical activity My healthcare team Planning and Creating my plan How do I get motivated Overcoming the barriers Making a commitment Being prepared Goal setting rewards How much can I do Knowing your limits When can I do physical activity or exercise Exercising during a flare up Exercising with a joint replacement Being physically active through pain What are the different types of exercise Range of movement Strengthening Aerobic How do I work exercise into daily life Are there any tips for exercising with my type of arthritis Osteoarthritis Rheumatoid arthritis Fibromyalgia Ankylosing spondylitis Final points to remember Preparing Getting motivated Moving Managing pain Download full booklet here Arthritis Ireland on Facebook Arthritis Ireland on Twitter Arthritis Ireland on YouTube Arthritis Ireland on Google Plus Arthritis

    Original URL path: http://www.arthritisireland.ie/go/information/booklets/physical_activity_arthritis (2016-02-07)
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  • What Is Psoriatic Arthritis? - Psoriatic Arthritis Information from Arthritis Ireland - Arthritis Ireland
    scaly skin rash Thickening discoloration and pitting of the nails Stiff painful swollen joints PsA typically affects the ankle knees toes and lower back The joints at the tips of the fingers may also swell confusing it with gout a form of inflammatory arthritis that typically affects only one joint Dactylitis This is a sausage like swelling of the fingers or toes This symptom is one that often helps differentiate PsA from RA in which the swelling is usually confined to a single joint Enthesitis People with PsA often develop tenderness or pain where tendons or ligaments attach to bones This commonly occurs at the heel Achilles tendinitis or the bottom of the foot plantar fasciitis but it can also occur in the elbow tennis elbow Each of these conditions could just as easily result from sports injuries or overuse as from PsA Pain and swelling at the back of the heel Eye inflammation less frequent What is the cause of psoriatic arthritis At present the exact cause is not known Research has shown that a particular combination of genes makes some people more likely to get psoriasis and PsA However having genes that predispose you to PsA does not necessarily mean you will develop this disease Some people think that an event has to occur to trigger it Unfortunately we don t know what that trigger is It could be a viral infection trauma or something else in the environment There may be more than one trigger How does the doctor diagnose psoriatic arthritis There is no single test for psoriatic arthritis but the diagnosis is based on your symptoms and a physical examination It is easier to diagnose if you have psoriasis along with red swollen fingers or toes Psoriasis and PsA occur more frequently in some families

    Original URL path: http://www.arthritisireland.ie/go/information/booklets/psoriatic_arthritis (2016-02-07)
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  • Surgery and Arthritis - Arthritis Ireland
    facebook Taking the decision to have any kind of surgery is no small matter If you havearthritis you may be considering surgery because the pain and mobility problems you experience are seriously affecting your independence and quality of life There is a lot to weigh up and find out about before making the decision This booklet aims to give an overview of what is involved in having surgery for your arthritis It contains information on preparing for surgery and the different types of procedures as well as what to expect from life after surgery In this booklet you will find Surgery and arthritis Why people with arthritis have surgery and what the alternatives are Weighing up the decision The benefits and risks of surgery How the system works Referral waiting times and the choices available to you The types of surgery Joint replacements and other types of surgery Preparing for surgery and what to expect on the day Practical steps you can take to prepare Life after surgery Recovery and returning home Download full booklet here Arthritis Ireland on Facebook Arthritis Ireland on Twitter Arthritis Ireland on YouTube Arthritis Ireland on Google Plus Arthritis Ireland on LinkedIn Quicklinks Information About

    Original URL path: http://www.arthritisireland.ie/go/information/booklets/surgery_arthritis (2016-02-07)
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